Best 25 of Ian Frazier quotes - MyQuotes

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Ian Frazier
By Anonym 20 Sep

Ian Frazier

Would Crazy Horse have spent this much to remodel a kitchen?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

Sometimes travel is merely an opportunity taken when you can.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

A book tour is not a good opportunity to let your mind wander. You have to pay attention, remember salespeople's and interviewers' names, succinctly summarize your book in a 'selling' way, and so on.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

Leading economists have shown that by shrinking Texas, we can actually create more income for Texas in the long run.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

I think what is important for things to be funny is if you the listener, or the reader, get a chance to supply the humor of it yourself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

There's an idea of the Plains as the middle of nowhere, something to be contemptuous of. But it's really a heroic place.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

Siberia is so big, it’s almost more an idea than a place

By Anonym 17 Sep

Ian Frazier

One very important key to maintaining our daily sanity is a simple scheduling tactic I call Putting Things the Hell Off.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

I am an author, and like many in my profession, I am also a traveling salesman, going all over in an attempt to persuade people to spend twenty-five dollars on a hardcover book by me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

Cursing dads are terrifying, you know? Cursing dads are - I don't know why, but no. It just doesn't seem to me that that would be funny. I mean it might be - you could try it and see. I suppose anybody just losing it and sputtering curses is pretty funny. But I think it would be more of a challenge, much more of a challenge, to make a cursing dad funny.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

Despite the obvious benefits, many Americans do not like Texas. Some even say they despise Texas, and make no secret of their feelings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

I don't want to participate in traditional Indian religious ceremonies - dance in a sun dance or pray in a sweat lodge or go on a vision quest with the help of a medicine man. The power of these ceremonies has an appeal, but I'm content with what little religion I already have.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

America can enjoy a vital, fully functioning government, with all the benefits provided by Texas, while reducing Texas at the same time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

Roy Blount is so funny, and he sounds like he's just talking, and the next thing you know he has tossed off an essay as elegant and intricately structured as a birdsong. His ear for American speech is better than anybody's.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

I don't want to collect Indian art, though pots and beadwork and blankets made by Indians remain the most beautiful art objects in the American West, in my opinion.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ian Frazier

People in Russia adapt to misery by a deep, deep humor.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

I only saw one English-speaking person all the way across Siberia.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

When I needed to think or was really upset, generally I climbed a tree.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

America is a leap of the imagination. From its beginning, people had only a persistent idea of what a good country should be. The idea involved freedom, equality, justice, and the pursuit of happiness; nowadays most of us probably could not describe it a lot more clearly than that. The truth is, it always has been a bit of a guess. No one has ever known for sure whether a country based on such an idea is really possible, but again and again, we have leaped toward the idea and hoped. What SuAnne Big Crow demonstrated in the Lead high school gym is that making the leap is the whole point. The idea does not truly live unless it is expressed by an act; the country does not live unless we make the leap from our tribe or focus group or gated community or demographic, and land on the shaky platform of that idea of a good country which all kinds of different people share. This leap is made in public, and it's made for free. It's not a product or a service that anyone will pay you for. You do it for reasons unexplainable by economics--for ambition, out of conviction, for the heck of it, in playfulness, for love. It's done in public spaces, face-to-face, where anyone is free to go. It's not done on television, on the Internet, or over the telephone; our electronic systems can only tell us if the leap made elsewhere has succeeded or failed. The places you'll see it are high school gyms, city sidewalks, the subway, bus stations, public parks, parking lots, and wherever people gather during natural disasters. In those places and others like them, the leaps that continue to invent and knit the country continue to be made. When the leap fails, it looks like the L.A. riots, or Sherman's March through Georgia. When it succeeds, it looks like the New York City Bicentennial Celebration in July 1976 or the Civil Rights March on Washington in 1963. On that scale, whether it succeeds or fails, it's always something to see. The leap requires physical presence and physical risk. But the payoff--in terms of dreams realized, of understanding, of people getting along--can be so glorious as to make the risk seem minuscule.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

Everything in Russia is made of cement - phone booths, fence posts and light bulbs.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

When the days start to get shorter, I want to be in some nice brick building on the East Coast with the lights glowing in the windows. When the daylight starts changing, I want to be out West.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

Human connection is the way things work. It's like a patronage system. You know somebody, and he knows somebody, and he knows somebody, and he knows the district governor, and it's okay.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

Words are charms. It's like a song you didn't even know you knew.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Frazier

And soon all the people who had accompanied me through life would be gone, too, and then even the people who had known us, and no one would remain on earth who had ever seen us, and those descended from us perhaps would know stories about us, perhaps once in a while they would pass by buildings where where we had lived and they would mention that we had lived there. And then the stories would fade, and our graves would go untended, and no one would guess what it had been like to wake before dawn in our breath-warmed bedrooms as the radiators clanked and our wives and husbands and children slept. And we would move from the nearer regions of the dead who are remembered into the farther regions of he forgotten, an on past those, into a space as while and big as the sky replicated forever.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ian Frazier

I don't have a disregard for my reader in humor pieces.