Best 486 of Edmund Burke quotes - MyQuotes

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Edmund Burke
By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Not men but measures a sort of charm by which many people get loose from every honorable engagement.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

To drive men from independence to live on alms, is itself great cruelty.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

All the forces of darkness need to succeed ... is for the people to do nothing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

To give freedom is still more easy. It is not necessary to guide; it only requires to let go the rein. But to form a free government; that is, to temper together these opposite elements of liberty and restraint in one work, requires much thought, deep reflection, a sagacious, powerful, and combining mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

There never was a bad man that had ability for good service.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Religious persecution may shield itself under the guise of a mistaken and over-zealous piety.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

By this unprincipled facility of changing the state as often, and as much, and in as many ways as there are floating fancies or fashions, the whole chain and continuity of the commonwealth would be broken. No one generation could link with the other. Men would become little better than the flies of a summer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The true way to mourn the dead is to take care of the living who belong to them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Contempt is not a thing to be despised. It may be borne with a calm and equal mind, but no man, by lifting his head high, can pretend that he does not perceive the scorns that are poured down on him from above.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The tyranny of a multitude is a multiplied tyranny.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Falsehood and delusion are allowed in no case whatever; but, as in the exercise of all the virtues, there is an economy of truth. It is a sort of temperance, by which a man speaks truth with measure, that he may speak it the longer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

If you can be well without health, you may be happy without virtue.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

But the age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists, and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

All writers on the science of policy are agreed, and they agree with experience, that all governments must frequently infringe the rules of justice to support themselves; that truth must give way to dissimulation, honesty to convenience, and humanity itself to the reigning of interest. The whole of this mystery of iniquity is called the reason of state.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The introduction of Christianity, which, under whatever form, always confers such inestimable benefits on mankind, soon made a sensible change in these rude and fierce manners.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

The grand instructor, time.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

In the groves of their academy, at the end of every vista, you see nothing but the gallows.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

I cannot help concurring with the opinion that an absolute democracy, no more than absolute monarchy, is to be reckoned among the legitimate forms of government.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Edmund Burke

Wise men will apply their remedies to vices, not to names; to the causes of evil which are permanent, not to the occasional organs by which they act, and the transitory modes in which they appear. Otherwise you will be wise historically, a fool in practice.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Men are as much blinded by the extremes of misery as by the extremes of prosperity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Among a people generally corrupt liberty cannot long exist.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Many of the greatest tyrants on the records of history have begun their reigns in the fairest manner. But the truth is, this unnatural power corrupts both the heart and the understanding.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Flattery is no more than what raises in a man's mind an idea of a preference which he has not.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Spain: A whale stranded upon the coast of Europe.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The wise determine from the gravity of the case; the irritable, from sensibility to oppression; the high minded, from disdain and indignation at abusive power in unworthy hands.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Humanity cannot be degraded by humiliation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Delusion and weakness produce not one mischief the less, because they are universal.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

No man can mortgage his injustice as a pawn for his fidelity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Is it in destroying and pulling down that skill is displayed? The shallowest understanding, the rudest hand, is more than equal to that task.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The individual is foolish; the multitude, for the moment is foolish, when they act without deliberation; but the species is wise, and, when time is given to it, as a species it always acts right.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Edmund Burke

The proposition is peace. Not peace through the medium of war; not peace to be hunted through the labyrinth of intricate and endless negotiations; not peace to arise out of universal discord, fomented from principle, in all parts of the empire; not peace to depend on the juridical determination of perplexing questions, or the precise marking the shadowy boundaries of a complex government. It is simple peace, sought in its natural course and in its ordinary haunts. It is peace sought in the spirit of peace, and laid in principles purely pacific.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

It is undoubtedly the business of ministers very much to consult the inclinations of the people, but they ought to take great care that they do not receive that inclination from the few persons who may happen to approach them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

Water and oil, simply considered, are capable of giving some pleasure to the taste. Water, when simple, is insipid, inodorous, colorless, and smooth; it is found, when not cold, to be a great resolver of spasms, and lubricator of the fibres; this power it probably owes to its smoothness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Edmund Burke

Their resistance was made to concession; their revolt was from protection; their blow was aimed at a hand holding out graces, favours, and immunities.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Edmund Burke

It is generally, in the season of prosperity that men discover their real temper, principles and design.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Never despair, but if you do, work on in despair.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

General rebellions and revolts of a whole people never were encouraged now or at any time. They are always provoked.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Religion is among the most powerful causes of enthusiasm.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

In all forms of government the people is the true legislator.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Laws, like houses, lean on one another.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

It looks to me to be narrow and pedantic to apply the ordinary ideas of criminal justice to this great public contest. I do not know the method of drawing up an indictment against a whole people.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The wisdom of our ancestors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The truly sublime is always easy, and always natural.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Greater mischief happens often from folly, meanness, and vanity than from the greater sins of avarice and ambition.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

I do not know the method of drawing up an indictment against a whole people.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

They defend their errors as if they were defending their inheritance.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

There is a sort of enthusiasm in all projectors, absolutely necessary for their affairs, which makes them proof against the most fatiguing delays, the most mortifying disappointments, the most shocking insults; and, what is severer than all, the presumptuous judgement of the ignorant upon their designs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

The arrogance of age must submit to be taught by youth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

You will smile here at the consistency of those democratists who, when they are not on their guard, treat the humbler part of the community with the greatest contempt, whilst, at the same time they pretend to make them the depositories of all power.