Best 486 of Edmund Burke quotes - MyQuotes

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Edmund Burke
By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The person who grieves suffers his passion to grow upon him; he indulges it, he loves it; but this never happens in the case of actual pain, which no man ever willingly endured for any considerable time.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The more accurately we search into the human mind, the stronger traces we everywhere find of his wisdom who made it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Refined policy ever has been the parent of confusion, and ever will be so as long as the world endures. Plain good intention, which is as easily discovered at the first view as fraud is surely detected at last, is of no mean force in the government of mankind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

You will not think it unnatural that those who have an object depending, which strongly engages their hopes and fears, should be somewhat inclining to superstition.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

It is for the most part in our skill in manners, and in the observations of time and place and of decency in general, that what is called taste by way of distinction consists; and which is in reality no other than a more refined judgment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

In their nomination to office they will not appoint to the exercise of authority as to a pitiful job, but as to a holy function.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

All writers on the science of policy are agreed, and they agree with experience, that all governments must frequently infringe the rules of justice to support themselves; that truth must give way to dissimulation, honesty to convenience, and humanity itself to the reigning of interest. The whole of this mystery of iniquity is called the reason of state.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Between craft and credulity, the voice of reason is stifled.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

To innovate is not to reform.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

If any ask me what a free government is, I answer, that, for any practical purpose, it is what the people think so,and that they, and not I, are the natural, lawful, and competent judges of this matter.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

In a democracy the majority of citizens is capable of exercising the most cruel oppressions upon the minority...and that oppression of the majority will extend to far great number, and will be carried on with much greater fury, than can almost ever be apprehended from the dominion of a single sceptre. Under a cruel prince they have the plaudits of the people to animate their generous constancy under their sufferings; but those who are subjected to wrong under multitudes are deprived of all external consolation: they seem deserted by mankind, overpowered by a conspiracy of their whole species.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Man acts from adequate motives relative to his interest, and not on metaphysical speculations.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Somebody has said, that a king may make a nobleman but he cannot make a gentleman.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

There was an ancient Roman lawyer, of great fame in the history of Roman jurisprudence, whom they called Cui Bono, from his having first introduced into judicial proceedings the argument, "What end or object could the party have had in the act with which he is accused.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

I have been told by an eminent bookseller, that in no branch of his business , after tracts of popular devotion, were so many books as those on the law exported to the Plantations .

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Man is by his constitution a religious animal.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Equity money is dynamic and debt money is static.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

A great empire and little minds go ill together.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

War never leaves where it found a nation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

I venture to say no war can be long carried on against the will of the people.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Freedom without virtue is not freedom but license to pursue whatever passions prevail in the intemperate mind; man's right to freedom being in exact proportion to his willingness to put chains upon his own appetites; the less restraint from within, the more must be imposed from without.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Laws are commanded to hold their tongues among arms; and tribunals fall to the ground with the peace they are no longer able to uphold.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Power gradually extirpates from the mind every humane and gentle virtue.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

A man is allowed sufficient freedom of thought, provided he knows how to choose his subject properly.... But the scene is changed as you come homeward, and atheism or treason may be the names given in Britain to what would be reason and truth if asserted in China.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Never, no never, did Nature say one thing, and wisdom another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

Turbulent, discontented men of quality, in proportion as they are puffed up with personal pride and arrogance, generally despise their own order.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Men want to be reminded, who do not want to be taught; because those original ideas of rectitude to which the mind is compelled to assent when they are proposed, are not always as present to us as they ought to be.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

It is from this absolute indifference and tranquillity of the mind, that mathematical speculations derive some of the most considerable advantages; because there is nothing to interest the imagination; because the judgment sits free and unbiased to examine the point. All proportions, every arrangement of quantity, is alike to the understanding, because the same truths result to it from all; from greater from lesser, from equality and inequality.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

He who calls in the aid of an equal understanding doubles his own; and he who profits by a superior understanding raises his powers to a level with the height of the superior standing he unites with.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

By looking into physical causes our minds are opened and enlarged; and in this pursuit, whether we take or whether we lose the game, the chase is certainly of service.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Depend upon it that the lovers of freedom will be free.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

Those who have been intoxicated with power... can never willingly abandon it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Restraint and discipline and examples of virtue and justice. These are the things that form the education of the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Art is a partnership not only between those who are living but between those who are dead and those who are yet to be born.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Of all things, wisdom is the most terrified with epidemical fanaticism, because, of all enemies, it is that against which she is the least able to furnish any kind of resource.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

I cannot stand forward, and give praise or blame to any thing which relates to human actions, and human concerns, on a simple view of the subject as it stands stripped of every relation, in all the nakedness and solitude of metaphysical abstraction. Circumstances (which with some gentlemen pass for nothing) give in reality to every political principle its distinguishing colour, and discriminating effect. The circumstances are what render every civil and political scheme beneficial or noxious to mankind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

The power of perpetuating our property in our families is one of the most valuable and interesting circumstances belonging to it, and that which tends most to the perpetuation of society itself. It makes our weakness subservient to our virtue; it grafts benevolence even upon avarice. The possession of family wealth and of the distinction which attends hereditary possessions (as most concerned in it,) are the natural securities for this transmission.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

To speak of atrocious crime in mild language is treason to virtue.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Reflect how you are to govern a people who think they ought to be free, and think they are not. Your scheme yields no revenue; it yields nothing but discontent, disorder, disobedience; and such is the state of America, that after wading through up to your eyes in blood, you could only end up where you begun; that is, to tax where no revenue is to be found... all is confusion beyond it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Our patience will achieve more than our force.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

All men have equal rights, but not to equal things.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

The credulity of dupes is as inexhaustible as the invention of knaves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Bad laws are the worst sort of tyranny.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Justice is itself the great standing policy of civil society; and any eminent departure from it, under any circumstances, lies under the suspicion of being no policy at all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

By gnawing through a dike, even a rat may drown a nation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

For as wealth is power, so all power will infallibly draw wealth to itself by some means or other; and when men are left no way of ascertaining their profits but by their means of obtaining them, those means will be increased to infinity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Edmund Burke

War is the matter which fills all history; and consequently the only, or almost the only, view in which we can see the external of political society is in a hostile shape: and the only actions to which we have always seen, and still see, all of them intent, are such as tend to the destruction of one another.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edmund Burke

Manners are of more importance than laws. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Edmund Burke

Curiosity is the most superficial of all the affections; it changes its object perpetually; it has an appetite which is very sharp, but very easily satisfied, and it has always an appearance of giddiness, restlessness and anxiety.