Best 390 of British quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Bea Davenport

The very sight of a daffodil still makes me shiver, because spring in the north of England is always so bitter.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Guillermo Cabrera Infante

I am the only British writer who writes in Spanish

By Anonym 18 Sep

Paul Revere

The British are coming.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jez Butterworth

I, Rooster John Byron, hereby place a curse Upon the Kennet and Avon Council, May they wander the land for ever, Never sleep twice in the same bed, Never drink water from the same well, And never cross the same river twice in a year. He who steps in my blood, may it stick to them Like hot oil. May it scorch them for life, And may the heat dry up their souls, And may they be filled with the melancholy Wine won't shift. And all their newborn babies Be born mangled, with the same marks, The same wounds of their fathers. Any uniform which brushes a single leaf of this wood Is cursed, and he who wears it this St George's Day, May he not see the next.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Amit Bhatia

I have a British passport, but the rest of my family have Indian passports, and I am Indian.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Edward Lucas White

His face was the sort of British face from which emotion has been so carefully banished that a foreigner is apt to think the wearer of the face incapable of any sort of feeling; the kind of face which, if it has any expression at all, expresses principally the resolution to go through the world decorously, without intruding upon or annoying anyone.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Brion Gysin

some trillions of years ago a sloppy, dirty giant flicked grease from his fingers. One of those gobs of grease is our universe on its way to the floor. Splat!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Nick Clegg

What I hope is in five years' time, I can go to the British people in the election and say: Lots of you doubted that coalition politics worked, but it has worked.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Stanley Wolpert

An excellent introduction to the rise and fall of the British Raj, accurate, succinct, and engaging.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Christopher Hitchens

The people who tend to raise antiwar slogans will do so generally when it's American or British interests involved.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Christopher Fowler

Statistics show that the nature of English crime is reverting to its oldest habits. In a country where so many desire status and wealth, petty annoyances can spark disproportionately violent behaviour. We become frustrated because we feel powerless, invisible, unheard. We crave celebrity, but that’s not easy to come by, so we settle for notoriety. Envy and bitterness drive a new breed of lawbreakers, replacing the old motives of poverty and the need for escape. But how do you solve crimes which no longer have traditional motives?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexandra Fuller

One of the things about being raised British in Africa is that you get this double whammy of toughness. The continent in place itself made you quite tough. And then you've got this British mother whose entire being rejects 'coddling' in case it makes you too soft. So there's absolutely nothing standing between you and a fairly rough experience.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Scarlett Avery

This has been such a scorching series.” — Jamie Leigh

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ivor Novello

British girls are as temperamental as Americans.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Scarlett Avery

Scarlett Avery is THE BEST!” —JC

By Anonym 15 Sep

Meg Cabot

There will be no more British guys. Unless they are members of the royal family, of course.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Morrissey

I always have to go out to work even if it's just a desk somewhere or an office or the British Library.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Tony Mcmahon

Identity politics is killings free speech on campus, silencing Muslim women struggle, boosting both Islamism and the far Right and pushing reconciled Muslim voices to the fringes. It makes implicit assumptions about Islam - from an Islamist, Left or Right- perspective - and insists all Muslims must adhere to that definition or be regarded not truly Muslim. It ignores the fact that most ordinary Muslims are not in favour of a violent and that in surveys and polls they support British values more than the general UK population. Yet the myth persists that the ideology of Islamism is the true expression of what it means to be Muslim.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Gregory Figg

The tall, thin serious man strode in, his dark cloak billowing so dramatically it threatened to extinguish the lamp flame with its draught. He advanced like a malevolent shadow consuming the dim orange light, filling the room with a presence almost more than human.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Nayana Currimbhoy

I really knew nothing about the dancing habits of the Scottish. But I wanted to help. "I could teach them Indian folk dances," I offered, scrounging my mind for school dances in gaudy garments. "Well, I'm not sure that they would be complex enough for competitions," she said. Pursing her lips, she blushed a dark, deep red. I knew I had said something wrong, but it took me a few days to understand the reason for Miss Manson's disapproval and discomfort. She blushed a beetroot red because I had unwittingly questioned the core belief of the school: British was Better.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen Baxter

By now there were whole new Industrial Revolutions going on in the Low Earths; the British seemed to have the building of steam engines and railways in their genes.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Harold Nicholson

The advantages of a hereditary Monarchy are self-evident. Without some such method of prescriptive, immediate and automatic succession, an interregnum intervenes, rival claimants arise, continuity is interrupted and the magic lost. Even when Parliament had secured control of taxation and therefore of government; even when the menace of dynastic conflicts had receded in to the coloured past; even when kingship had ceased to be transcendental and had become one of many alternative institutional forms; the principle of hereditary Monarchy continued to furnish the State with certain specific and inimitable advantages. Apart from the imponderable, but deeply important, sentiments and affections which congregate around an ancient and legitimate Royal Family, a hereditary Monarch acquires sovereignty by processes which are wholly different from those by which a dictator seizes, or a President is granted, the headship of the State. The King personifies both the past history and the present identity of the Nation as a whole. Consecrated as he is to the service of his peoples, he possesses a religious sanction and is regarded as someone set apart from ordinary mortals. In an epoch of change, he remains the symbol of continuity; in a phase of disintegration, the element of cohesion; in times of mutability, the emblem of permanence. Governments come and go, politicians rise and fall: the Crown is always there. A legitimate Monarch moreover has no need to justify his existence, since he is there by natural right. He is not impelled as usurpers and dictators are impelled, either to mesmerise his people by a succession of dramatic triumphs, or to secure their acquiescence by internal terrorism or by the invention of external dangers. The appeal of hereditary Monarchy is to stability rather than to change, to continuity rather than to experiment, to custom rather than to novelty, to safety rather than to adventure. The Monarch, above all, is neutral. Whatever may be his personal prejudices or affections, he is bound to remain detached from all political parties and to preserve in his own person the equilibrium of the realm. An elected President – whether, as under some constitutions, he be no more than a representative functionary, or whether, as under other constitutions, he be the chief executive – can never inspire the same sense of absolute neutrality. However impartial he may strive to become, he must always remain the prisoner of his own partisan past; he is accompanied by friends and supporters whom he may seek to reward, or faced by former antagonists who will regard him with distrust. He cannot, to an equal extent, serve as the fly-wheel of the State.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Claire Forlani

I'd be quite excited to play somebody British.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mahatma Gandhi

The collectors of revenue and the policeman are the only symbols by which millions in India's villages know British rule.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Martin Mcguinness

The British government says that for Sinn Fein to be involved in talks the guns must be left at the door.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Karel Reisz

The British cinema had been very dull and conformist.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leon M. Lederman

The British philosopher Bertrand Russell said that philosophy went downhill after Democritus and did not recover until the Renaissance.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Catherine Drinker Bowen

There is a marvelous turn and trick to British arrogance; its apparent unconsciousness makes it twice as effectual.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Melvyn Bragg

There's nothing the British like better than a bloke who comes from nowhere, makes it, and then gets clobbered.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Paris Hilton

All British people have plain names, and that works pretty well over there.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Camille Paglia

Obama's folksy come-on is as bad as Madonna's faux British - and both are in need of fresh inspiration.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Martin Schulz

Primary responsibility for Brexit lies with British conservatives, who took an entire continent hostage.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Rick Yancey

Ah. And then you kill him." "No," Arkwright replied patiently. "We are British. We avoid murder if we can help it.{...}

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victoria Beckham

I'm very proud to be British, and my brand is British.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Elvis Costello

I've never felt British. I'm just not interested in national identity. I don't know why.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Tony Benn

Britain is the only colony in the British Empire and it is up to us now to liberate ourselves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Steve Earle

I have a theory that the people who cook in jails are British chefs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jahangir

My unbeaten record and the 10 British Open wins have not been equalled.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Tinie Tempah

I'm quite a fan of British designers.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Julian Fellowes

Henry Denton: You Brits really don't have a sense of humor do you? Elsie: We do if something's funny, sir.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Wakoski

I definitely wish to distinguish American poetry from British or other English language poetry.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Will Ferguson

With or without the Royals, we are not Americans. Nor are we British. Or French. Or Void. We are something else. And the sooner we define this, the better.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Monica Dickens

People were kind and friendly and amusing, but they thought that companionship and conversation were synonymous, and some of them had voices that jarred in your head. There was a lot to be said for dogs. They understood without telling you so, and they were always pleasing to look at, awake or asleep, like Bingo. He slept now, with little whistling snores, in his basket at the side of the fire, his stubby legs and one whiskery eyebrow twitching to the fitful tempo of his dreams.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wayne Knight

I know there are some people in British Columbia who are still holding a vigil for '3rd Rock'.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Vince Cable

When I was a child we were sufficiently well off for me to be a picky eater and I still cannot eat vegetables cooked in the traditional British manner.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Hassan Zia Ahmed

if a colonizer replaces language, clothes and names of a nation then what remains is a mere shadow of the colonizer.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Thomas Beecham

The British like any kind of music so long as it is loud.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Caitlin Moran

But, of course, you might be asking yourself, 'Am I a feminist? I might not be. I don't know! I still don't know what it is! I'm too knackered and confused to work it out. That curtain pole really still isn't up! I don't have time to work out if I am a women's libber! There seems to be a lot to it. WHAT DOES IT MEAN?' I understand. So here is the quick way of working out if you're a feminist. Put your hand in your pants. a) Do you have a vagina? and b) Do you want to be in charge of it? If you said 'yes' to both, then congratulations! You're a feminist.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Tina Fey

I'm a big fan of 'The Office,' both the British and the American versions.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ben Nicholson

The Irish and British, they love satire, its a large part of the culture.