Best 119 of Peter Lynch quotes - MyQuotes

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Peter Lynch
By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Improved turnout will give parliament and government the appearance of being more legitimate.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Long shots almost always miss the mark.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

You only need a few good stocks in your lifetime. I mean how many times do you need a stock to go up ten-fold to make a lot of money? Not a lot.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you can't find any companies that you think are attractive, put your money in the bank until you discover some.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Investing in stocks is an art, not a science, and people who've been trained to rigidly quantify everything have a big disadvantage.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

In the summer of 1990, I was buying stocks and I was probably three or four months early there. But we had a great rally in 1991.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

Well, I think the secret is if you have a lot of stocks, some will do mediocre, some will do okay, and if one of two of 'em go up big time, you produce a fabulous result. And I think that's the promise to some people.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

It's human nature to keep doing something as long as it's pleasurable and you can succeed at it, which is why the world population continues to double every 40 years.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

The list of qualities (an investor should have) include patience, self-reliance, common sense, a tolerance for pain, open-mindedness, detachment, persistence, humility, flexibility, a willingness to do independent research, an equal willingness to admit mistakes, and the ability to ignore general panic.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Go for a business that any idiot can run - because sooner or later, any idiot probably is going to run it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

The real key to making money in stocks is not to get scared out of them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

In our society, it's been the men who've handled most of the finances, and the women who've stood by and watched men botch things up.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If a picture is worth a thousand words, in business, so is a number.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Never invest in a company without understanding its finances. The biggest losses in stocks come from companies with poor balance sheets.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

My method for picking stocks has never changed. When businesses go from crappy to semicrappy, there's money to be made.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

In business, competition is never as healthy as total domination.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

It isn't the head but the stomach that determines the fate of the stockpicker.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Logic is the subject that has helped me most in picking stocks, if only because it taught me to identify the peculiar illogic of Wall Street. Actually Wall Street thinks just as the Greeks did. The early Greeks used to sit around for days and debate how many teeth a horse has. They thought they could figure it out just by sitting there, instead of checking the horse. A lot of investors sit around and debate whether a stock is going up, as if the financial muse will give them the answer, instead of checking the company.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Far more money has been lost by investors preparing for corrections, or trying to anticipate corrections, than has been lost in corrections themselves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

In the long run, a portfolio of well chosen stocks and/or equity mutual funds will always outperform a portfolio of bonds or a money-market account. In the long run, a portfolio of poorly chosen stocks won't outperform the money left under the mattress.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

A stock market decline is as routine as a January blizzard in Colorado. If you're prepared, it can't hurt you. A decline is a great opportunity to pick up the bargains left behind by investors who are fleeing the storm in panic.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you're lucky enough to have been rewarded in life to the degree that I have, there comes a point at which you have to decide whether to become a slave to your net worth by devoting the rest of your life to increasing it or to let what you've accumulated begin to serve you.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

When even the analysts are bored, it's time to start buying.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Bargains are the holy grail of the true stockpicker. The fact that 10 to 30 percent of our net worth is lost in a market sell-off is of little consequence. We see the latest correction not as a disaster but as an opportunity to acquire more shares at low prices. This is how great fortunes are made over time.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

The natural-born investor is a myth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

I talk to hundreds of companies a year and spend hour after hour in heady pow-wows with CEOs, financial analysts and my colleagues in the mutual-fund business, but I stumble onto the big winners in extracurricular situations, the same way you do.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

I think you have to learn that there's a company behind every stock, and that there's only one real reason why stocks go up. Companies go from doing poorly to doing well or small companies grow to large companies.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

As I look back on it now, it's obvious that studying history and philosophy was much better preparation for the stock market than, say, studying statistics.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you can follow only one bit of data, follow the earnings - assuming the company in question has earnings. I subscribe to the crusty notion that sooner or later earnings make or break an investment in equities. What the stock price does today, tomorrow, or next week is only a distraction.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Stocks are a safe bet, but only if you stay invested long enough to ride out the corrections.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

I spend about fifteen minutes a year on economic analysis.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

A price drop in a good stock is only a tragedy if you sell at that price and never buy more. To me, a price drop is an opportunity to load up on bargains from among your worst performers and your laggards that show promise. If you can't convince yourself "When I'm down 25 percent, I'm a buyer" and banish forever the fatal thought "When I'm down 25 percent, I'm a seller," then you'll never make a decent profit in stocks.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you have the stomach for stocks, but neither the time nor the inclination to do the homework, invest in equity mutual funds.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

When people discover they are no good at baseball or hockey, they put away their bats and their skates and they take up amateur golf or stamp collecting or gardening. But when people discover they are no good at picking stocks, they are likely to continue to do it anyway.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

I'm always fully invested. It's a great feeling to be caught with your pants up.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Behind every stock is a company. Find out what it's doing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

There's lots of stocks out there and all you need is a few of 'em. That's been my philosophy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

Investing is fun and exciting, but dangerous if you don't do any work.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

The extravagance of any corporate office is directly proportional to management's reluctance to reward the shareholders.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

I deal in facts, not forecasting the future. That's crystal ball stuff. That doesn't work.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you're prepared to invest in a company, then you ought to be able to explain why in simple language that a fifth grader could understand, and quickly enough so the fifth grader won't get bored.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you can follow only one bit of data, follow the earnings - assuming the company in question has earnings.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Owning stocks is like having children - don't get involved with more than you can handle.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

If you can find a company that can get away with raising prices year after year without losing customers (an addictive product such as cigarettes fills the bill), you've got a terrific investment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

Often, there is no correlation between the success of a company's operations and the success of its stock over a few months or even a few years. In the long term, there is a 100 percent correlation between the success of the company and the success of its stock. This disparity is the key to making money; it pays to be patient, and to own successful companies.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

The person that turns over the most rocks wins the game. And that's always been my philosophy.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

What makes stocks valuable in the long run isn't the market. It's the profitability of the shares in the companies you own. As corporate profits increase, corporations become more valuable and sooner or later, their shares will sell for a higher price.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Lynch

I like to buy a company any fool can manage because eventually one will.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Peter Lynch

I've always been a great lover of baseball.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Peter Lynch

Visiting stores and testing products is one of the critical elements of the analyst's job.