Best 208 of Walter Savage Landor quotes - MyQuotes

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Walter Savage Landor
By Anonym 16 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

I loved him not; and yet, now he is gone, I feel I am alone. I check’d him while he spoke; yet, could he speak, Alas! I would not check. For reasons not to love him once I sought, And wearied all my thought To vex myself and him: I now would give My love could he but live Who lately lived for me, and, when he found ’Twas vain, in holy ground He hid his face amid the shades of death. I waste for him my breath Who wasted his for me! but mine returns, And this lorn bosom burns With stifling heat, heaving it up in sleep, And waking me to weep Tears that had melted his soft heart: for years Wept he as bitter tears. Merciful God! such was his latest prayer, These may she never share. Quieter is his breath, his breast more cold, Than daisies in the mould, Where children spell, athwart the churchyard gate, His name and life’s brief date. Pray for him, gentle souls, whoe’er you be, And oh! pray too for me!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Why cannot we be delighted with an author, and even feel a predilection for him, without a dislike of others? An admiration of Catullus or Virgil, of Tibullus or Ovid, is never to be heightened by a discharge of bile on Horace.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

He who brings ridicule to bear against truth finds in his hand a blade without a hilt.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Was genius ever ungrateful? Mere talents are dry leaves, tossed up and down by gusts of passion, and scattered and swept away; but, Genius lies on the bosom of Memory, and Gratitude at her feet.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

There is no eloquence which does not agitate the soul.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

All schools of philosophy, and almost all authors, are rather to be frequented for exercise than for weight.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Piety--warm, soft, and passive as the ether round the throne of Grace--is made callous and inactive by kneeling too much.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

The spirit of Greece, passing through and ascending above the world, hath so animated universal nature, that the very rocks and woods, the very torrents and wilds burst forth with it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Hope is the mother of faith.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Ambition is but avarice on stilts, and masked. God sometimes sends a famine, sometimes a pestilence, and sometimes a hero, for the chastisement of mankind; none of them surely for our admiration.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Nature I loved, and next to Nature, Art.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Fame, they tell you, is air; but without air there is no life for any; without fame there is none for the best.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Be assured that, although men of eminent genius have been guilty of all other vices, none worthy of more than a secondary name has ever been a gamester. Either an excess of avarice or a deficiency of what, in physics, is called excitability, is the cause of it; neither of which can exist in the same bosom with genius, with patriotism, or with virtue.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

There is delight in singing, though none hear beside the singer.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

States, like men, have their growth, their manhood, their decrepitude, their decay.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Truth is a point, the subtlest and finest; harder than adamant; never to be broken, worn away, or blunted. Its only bad quality is, that it is sure to hurt those who touch it; and likely to draw blood, perhaps the life blood, of those who press earnestly upon it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Falsehood is for a season.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Those who are quite satisfied sit still and do nothing; those who are not quite satisfied are the sole benefactors of the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

When the mind loses its feeling for elegance, it grows corrupt and groveling, and seeks in the crowd what ought to be found at home.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

I would recommend a free commerce both of matter and mind. I would let men enter their own churches with the same freedom as their own houses; and I would do it without a homily or graciousness or favor, for tyranny itself is to me a word less odious than toleration.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Clear writers, like fountains, do not seem so deep as they are; the turbid look the most profound.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

It often comes into my head That we may dream when we are dead, But I am far from sure we do. O that it were so! then my rest Would be indeed among the blest; I should for ever dream of you.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

God made the rose out of what was left of woman at the creation. The great difference is, we feel the rose's thorns when we gather it; and the other's when we have had it for some time.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

We fancy that our afflictions are sent us directly from above; sometimes we think it in piety and contrition, but oftener in moroseness and discontent.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

You should indeed have longer tarried By the roadside before you married.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

A mercantile democracy may govern long and widely; a mercantile aristocracy cannot stand.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

We are no longer happy so soon as we wish to be happier.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Friendship is a vase, which, when it is flawed by heat, or violence, or accident, may as well be broken at once; it can never be trusted after.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Democracy is always the work of kings. Ashes, which in themselves are sterile, fertilize the land they are cast upon.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

It appears to be among the laws of nature, that the mighty of intellect should be pursued and carped by the little, as the solitary flight of one great bird is followed by the twittering petulance of many smaller.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

A little praise is good for a shy temper; it teaches it to rely on the kindness of others.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Cats ask plainly for what they want.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

We cannot be contented because we are happy, and we cannot be happy because we are contented.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

It is easy to look down on others; to look down on ourselves is the difficulty.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Little men build up great ones, but the snow colossus soon melts; the good stand under the eye of God, and therefore stand.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Harmonious words render ordinary ideas acceptable; less ordinary, pleasant; novel and ingenious ones, delightful. As pictures and statues, and living beauty, too, show better by music-light, so is poetry irradiated, vivified, glorified', and raised into immortal life by harmony.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

There is a gravity which is not austere nor captious, which belongs not to melancholy nor dwells in contraction of heart: but arises from tenderness and hangs upon reflection.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Fame often rests at first upon something accidental, and often, too, is swept away, or for a time removed; but neither genius nor glory, is conferred at once, nor do they glimmer and fall, like drops in a grotto, at a shout.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

And Modesty, who, when she goes, Is gone for ever.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Justice is often pale and melancholy; but Gratitude, her daughter, is constantly in the flow of spirits and the bloom of loveliness.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

If in argument we can make a man angry with us, we have drawn him from his vantage ground and overcome him.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Cruelty is no more the cure of crimes than it is the cure of sufferings; compassion, in the first instance, is good for both; I have known it to bring compunction when nothing else would.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

As the pearl ripens in the obscurity of its shell, so ripens in the tomb all the fame that is truly precious.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

The habit of pleasing by flattery makes a language soft; the fear of offending by truth makes it circuitous and conventional.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

In the hours of distress and misery, the eyes of every mortal turn to friendship; in the hours of gladness and conviviality, what is our want? It is friendship. When the heart overflows with gratitude, or with any other sweet or sacred sentiment, what is the word to which it would give utterance? A friend.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Kings play at war unfairly with republics; they can only lose some earth, and some creatures they value as little, while republics lose in every soldier a part of themselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Teach him to live unto God and unto thee; and he will discover that women, like the plants in woods, derive their softness and tenderness from the shade.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Many love music but for music's sake, Many because her touches can awake Thoughts that repose within the breast half-dead, And rise to follow where she loves to lead. What various feelings come from days gone by! What tears from far-off sources dim the eye! Few, when light fingers with sweet voices play, And melodies swell, pause, and melt away, Mind how at every touch, at every tone, A spark of life hath glistened and hath gone.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

Avoid, which many grave men have not done, words taken from sacred subjects and from elevated poetry: these we have seen vilely prostituted. Avoid too the society of the barbarians who misemploy them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walter Savage Landor

If there were no falsehood in the world, there would be no doubt, if there were no doubt, there would be no inquiry; if no inquiry, no wisdom, no knowledge, no genius; and Fancy herself would lie muffled up in her robe, inactive, pale, and bloated.