Best 109 of Dodie Smith quotes - MyQuotes

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Dodie Smith
By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I didn't make any mistake. I know that when he nearly asked me to marry him it was only on impulse It is part if a follow-my-leader game of second-best we have all been playing - Rose with Simon, Simon with me, me with Stephen and Stephen, I suppose, with that detestable Leda Fox-Cotton. It isn't a very good game; the people you play it with are apt to get hurt.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

My hand is very tired but I want to go on writing. I keep resting and thinking. All day I have been two people - the me imprisoned in yesterday and the me out here on the mound; and now there is a third me trying to get in - the me in what is going to happen next.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dodie Smith

The Devil's out of fashion.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Rose doesn’t like the flat country, but I always did – flat country seems to give the sky such a chance.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

I wonder if there isn't a catch about having plenty of money? Does it eventually take the pleasure out of things?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

It is the still, yellow kind of afternoon when one is apt to get stuck in a dream if one sits very quiet

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

Everything in the least connected with him has value for me; if someone even mentions his name it is like a little present to me-and I long to mention it myself

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

I have really sinned. I am going to pause now, and sit here on the mound repenting in deepest shame.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Perhaps it would really be rather dull to be married and settled for life. Liar! It would be heaven.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

People's clothes ought to be buried with them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Time takes the ugliness and horror out of death and turns it into beauty.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I could marry the Devil himself if he had some money.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I suddenly knew it wasn't only the wonderful luxury of being in love that had been buoying me up: deep down, in some vague, mixed up way I had been letting myself hope he didn't really care for her, that it was me he loved and that kissing me would have made him realise it. 'You're a fool and worse -' I told myself. 'You're a would-be thief.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

What a tiny list of friends I have! All my fault. I less and less want to see people.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

But some characters in books are really real--Jane Austen's are; and I know those five Bennets at the opening of Pride and Prejudice, simply waiting to raven the young men at Netherfield Park, are not giving one thought to the real facts of marriage.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

And no bathroom on earth will make up for marrying a bearded man you hate.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

A mist is rolling over the fields. Why is a summer mist romantic and autumn mist just sad?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

The family - that dear octopus from whose tentacles we never quite escape, nor, in our inmost hearts, ever quite wish to.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I could see he was nervous; at least, I thought I could, but then it struck me how little I know of him, or of Topaz or Rose or anyone in the world, really, except myself.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dodie Smith

... there is something revolting about the way girls' minds so often jump to marriage long before they jump to love. And most of those minds are shut to what marriage really means.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I don’t intend to let myself become the kind of author who can only work in seclusion – after all, Jane Austen wrote in the sitting-room and merely covered up her work when a visitor called (though I bet she thought a thing or two) – but I am not quite Jane Austen yet and there are limits to what I can stand.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

Cruel blows of fate call for extreme kindness in the family circle.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Wakings are the worst times--almost before my eyes are open a great weight seems to roll on my heart.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Topaz was wonderfully patient - but sometimes I wonder if it is not only patience, but also a faint resemblance to cows.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

Certain unique books seem to be without forerunners or successors as far as their authors are concerned. Even though they may profoundly influence the work of other writers, for their creator they're complete, not leading anywhere.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

It's a beautiful sight to see good dancers doing simple steps. It's a painful sight to see beginners doing complicated patterns.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dodie Smith

There is something revolting about the way girls' minds so often jump to marriage long before they jump to love.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

I should rather like to tear these last pages out of the book. Shall I? No-a journal ought not to cheat.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Stew's so comforting on a rainy day.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

I believe it is customary to get one's washing over first in baths and bask afterwards; personally, I bask first. I have discovered that the first few minutes are the best and not to be wasted-- my brain always seethes with ideas and life suddenly looks much better than did.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

...With stories even a page can take me hours, but the truth seems to flow out as fast as I can get it down.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

...But I am not quite Jane Austen yet and there are limits to what I can stand.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

How indescribable the scent of autumn flowers was– barely a scent at all, really; just a faint, strange smell, pleasant but sad. Could a smell be sad or was it just the association with the dying summer?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Perhaps watching someone you love suffer can teach you even more than suffering yourself can.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Though he had very little Latin beyond "Cave canem," he had, as a young dog, devoured Shakespeare (in a tasty leather binding).

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dodie Smith

Then I told myself that as I never gave the Church a thought when I was feeling happy, I could hardly expect it to do anything for me when I wasn't. You can't get insurance money without paying in premiums.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

There was a wonderful atmosphere of gentle age, a smell of flowers and beeswax, sweet yet faintly sour and musty; a smell that makes you feel very tender towards the past.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Dodie Smith

Now, paper and pencils," said Miss Marcy, clapping her hands. Writing paper is scarce in this house, and I had no intention of tearing sheets out of this exercise book, which is a superb sixpenny one the Vicar gave me. In the end, Miss Marcy took the middle pages out of her library record, which gave us a pleasant feeling that we were stealing from the government, and then we sat round the table and elected her chairman.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

And what I thought most about was luxury. I had never realised before that it is more than just having things; it makes the very air feel different. And I felt different, breathing the air: relaxed, lazy, still sad but with the edge taken off the sadness. Perhaps the effect wears off in time, or perhaps you don't notice it if you are born to it, but it does seem to me that the climate of richness must always be a little dulling to the senses. Perhaps it takes the edge off joy as well as off sorrow.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

I wanted so terribly to be good to him.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Just to be in love seemed the most blissful luxury I had ever known. The thought came to me that perhaps it is the loving that counts, not the being loved in return -- that perhaps true loving can never know anything but happiness. For a moment I felt that I had discovered a great truth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dodie Smith

Did you think of anything when Miss Marcy said Scoatney Hall was being re-opened? I thought of the beginning of Pride and Prejudice – where Mrs. Bennet says 'Netherfield Park is let a last.' And then Mr. Bennet goes over to call on the rich new owner.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

And who says you always have to understand things? You can like them without understanding them -- like 'em better sometimes.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

It isn't a bit of use my pretending I'm not crying, because I am... Pause to mop up. Better now. Perhaps it would really be rather dull to be married and settled for life. Liar! It would be heaven.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

How I wish I lived in a Jane Austen novel!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dodie Smith

I have found that sitting in a place where you have never sat before can be inspiring.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Sometimes [the expression] old age has a kind of harrowing beauty. But elderly - ugh!

By Anonym 20 Sep

Dodie Smith

When I read a book, I put in all the imagination I can, so that it is almost like writing the book as well as reading it - or rather, it is like living it. It makes reading so much more exciting, but I don't suppose many people try to do it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Smith

I suddenly knew that religion, God - something beyond everyday life - was there to be found, provided one is really willing. And I saw that though what I felt in the church was only imagination, it was a step on the way; because imagination itself can be a kind of willingness - a pretense that things are real, due to one's longing for them. It struck me that this was somehow tied up with what the Vicar said about religion being an extension of art - and then I had a glimpse of how religion can really cure you of sorrow; somehow make use of it, turn it to beauty, just as art can make sad things beautiful. I found myself saying: 'Sacrifice is the secret - you have to sacrifice things for art and it's the same with religion; and then the sacrifice turns out to be a gain.' Then I got confused and I couldn't hold on to what I meant - until Miss Blossom remarked: 'Nonsense, duckie - it's prefectly simple. You lose yourself in something beyond yourself and it's a lovely rest.' I saw that, all right. Then I thought: 'But that's how Miss Marcy cured her sorrow, too - only she lost herself in other people instead of in religion.' Which way of life was best - hers or the Vicar's? I decided that he loves God and merely likes the villagers, whereas she loves the villagers and merely likes God - and then I suddenly wondered if I could combine both ways, love God and my neighbor equally. Was I really willing to?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dodie Smith

Only half a page left now. Shall I fill it with 'I love you, I love you'-- like father's page of cats on the mat? No. Even a broken heart doesn't warrant a waste of good paper.