Best 28 of John Herschel quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
John Herschel
By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

The besetting evil of our age is the temptation to squander and dilute thought on a thousand different lines of inquiry.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

God knows how ardently I wish I had ten lives.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

Accustomed to trace the operation of general causes, and the exemplification of general laws, in circumstances where the uninformed and unenquiring eye perceives neither novelty nor beauty, [the scientist and natural philosopher] walks in the midst of wonders.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

...Nature builds up her refined and invisible architecture, with a delicacy eluding our conception, yet with a symmetry and beauty which we are never weary of admiring.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Man is constituted as a speculative being; he contemplates the world, and the objects around him, not with a passive indifferent eye, but as a system disposed with order and design.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Self-respect is the cornerstone of all virtue.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

Almost all the greatest discoveries in astronomy have resulted from what we have elsewhere termed Residual Phenomena, of a qualitative or numerical kind, of such portions of the numerical or quantitative results of observation as remain outstanding and unaccounted for, after subducting and allowing for all that would result from the strict application of known principles.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Occurrences which according to received theories ought not to happen, are the facts which serve as clues to new discoveries

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

The novel, in its best form, I regard as one of the most powerful engines of civilization ever invented.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

Were I to pray for a taste which should stand me in good stead under every variety of circumstances and be a source of happiness and a cheerfulness to me during life and a shield against its ills, however things might go amiss and the world frown upon me, it would be a taste for reading.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

According to this view of the matter, there is nothing casual in the formation of Metamorphic Rocks. All strata, once buried deep enough, (and due TIME allowed!!!) must assume that state,-none can escape. All records of former worlds must ultimately perish.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

There is a gentle, but perfectly irresistible coercion in a habit of reading well directed, over the whole tenor of a man's character and conduct, which is not the less effectual because it works insensibly, and because it is really the last thing he dreams of.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

To the natural philosopher, there is no natural object unimportant or trifling. From the least of Nature's works he may learn the greatest lessons.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

Every student who enters upon a scientific pursuit, especially if at a somewhat advanced period of life, will find not only that he has much to learn, but much also to unlearn.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

The barrier has begun to yield.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Music and dancing (the more the pity) have become so closely associated with ideas of riot and debauchery among the less cultivated classes, that a taste for them, for their own sakes, can hardly be said to exist, and before they can be recommended as innocent or safe amusements, a very great change of ideas must take place.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

No doubt the testimony of natural reason, on whatever exercised, must, of necessity, stop short of those truths which it is the object of revelation to make known; still it places the existence and personal attributes of the Deity on such grounds as to render doubts absurd and atheism ridiculous.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

Humans always have fear of an unknown situation -- this is normal. The important thing is what we do about it. If fear is permitted to become a paralyzing thing that interferes with proper action, then it is harmful. The best antidote to fear is to know all we can about a situation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Self-respect,--the corner-stone of all virtue.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

Speculations apparently the most unprofitable have almost invariably been those from which the greatest practical applications have emanated.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Herschel

The end of the eighteenth and the commencement of the nineteenth century are remarkable for the small amount of scientific movement going on in this country, especially in its more exact departments. Mathematics were at the last gasp, and astronomy nearly so; I mean in those members of its frame which depend upon precise measurement and systematic calculation. The chilling torpor of routine had begun to spread itself over all those branches of Science which wanted the excitement of experimental research.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

[When nature appears complicated:] The moment we contemplate it as it is, and attain a position from which we can take a commanding view, though but of a small part of its plan, we never fail to recognize that sublime simplicity on which the mind rests satisfied that it has attained the truth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

The stars are the land-marks of the universe.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

A mind which has once imbibed a taste for scientific inquiry, and has learnt the habit of applying its principles readily to the cases which occur, has within itself an inexhaustible source of pure and exciting contemplations.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

It can hardly be pressed forcibly enough on the attention of the student of nature, that there is scarcely any natural phenomenon which can be fully and completely explained, in all its circumstances, without a union of several, perhaps of all, the sciences.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

First, In showing in how to avoid attempting impossibilities. Second, In securing us from important mistakes in attempting what is, in itself possible, by means either inadequate or actually opposed to the end in view. Thirdly, In enabling us to accomplish our ends in the easiest, shortest, most economical, and most effectual manner. Fourth, In inducing us to attempt, and enabling us to accomplish, object which, but for such knowledge, we should never have thought of understanding. On the ways that a knowledge of the order of nature can be of use.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

All human discoveries seem to be made only for the purpose of confirming more strongly the truths come from on high, and contained in the sacred writings.