Best 116 of Kenneth E. Boulding quotes - MyQuotes

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Kenneth E. Boulding
By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The human condition can almost be summed up in the observation that, whereas all experiences are of the past, all decisions are about the future. It is the great task of human knowledge to bridge this gap and to find those patterns in the past which can be projected into the future as realistic images.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

One reason why the progressive state is 'cheerful' is that social conflict is diminished by it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The proposition that the meek (that is the adaptable and serviceable), inherit the earth is not merely a wishful sentiment of religion, but an iron law of evolution.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Knowledge exists in minds, not in books. Before what has been found can be used by practitioners, someone must organize it, integrate it, extract the message.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Because of his capacity for abstract communications and language and his ability to enter in imagination into the lives of others, man is able to build organizations of a size and complexity far beyond those of the lower animals.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The evolutionary vision is agnostic in regard to systems in the universe of greater complexity than those of which human beings have clear knowledge. It recognizes aesthetic, moral, and religious ideas and experiences as a species, in this case of mental structures or of images, which clearly interacts with other species in the world's great' ecosystem.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The discounting presumably is to be done for each period of time at that rate of interest which represents the alternative cost of employing capital in the occupation in question; that is, at the rate which the entrepreneur could obtain in other investments

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

One of the most important skills of the economist, therefore, is that of simplification of the model. Two important methods of simplification have been developed by economists. One is the method of partial equilibrium analysis (or microeconomics), generally associated with the name of Alfred Marshall and the other is the method of aggregation (or macro-economics), associated with the name of John Maynard Keynes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The human experience can almost be summed up in the observation that, whereas all decisions are of the past, all decisions are about the future. The image of the future, therefore, is the key to all choice-oriented behavior. The character and quality of the images of the future which prevail in a society is therefore the most important clue to its overall dynamics.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The troubles of the 20th century are not unlike those of adolescence -- rapid growth beyond the ability of organizations to manage, uncontrollable emotion, and a desperate search for identity. Out of adolescence, however, comes maturity in which physical growth with all its attendant difficulties comes to an end, but in which growth continues in knowledge, in spirit, in community, and in love; it is to this that we look forward as a human race. This goal, once seen with our eyes, will draw our faltering feet toward it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

If we saw tomorrow's newspaper today, tomorrow would never happen.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

As long as man was small in numbers and limited in technology, he could realistically regard the earth as an infinite reservoir, an infinite source of inputs and an infinite cesspool for outputs. Today we can no longer make this assumption. Earth has become a space ship, not only in our imagination but also in the hard realities of the social, biological, and physical system in which man is enmeshed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Mathematicians themselves set up standards of generality and elegance in their exposition which are a bar to understand.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

It is much more accurate to identify the factors of production as know-how (that is genetic information structure), energy, and materials, for, as we have seen, all processes of production involve the direction of energy by some know-how structure toward the selection, transportation, and transformation of materials into the product

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Without the heroic, man has no meaning; without the economic, he has no sense. Economic man is most likely to be economic woman - a good wife, pulling the coat tails of her heroic husband, checking his extravagances of speech and action with words of caution and good sense. But without the heroic coat tails to pull, life for both of them would be dull and savorless indeed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Economic problems have no sharp edges. They shade off imperceptibly into politics, sociology, and ethics. Indeed, it is hardly an exaggeration to say that the ultimate answer to every economic problem lies in some other field.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

There is something, however humble, which can properly be called skill among those who recognise themselves as economists.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

[The loss-of-strength gradient is] the degree to which military and political power diminishes as we move a unit distance away from its home base.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Economic progress means the discovery and application of better ways of doing things to satisfy our wants. The piping of water to a household that previously dragged it from a well, the growing of two blades of grass where one grew before, the development of a power loom that enables one man to weave ten times as much as he could before, the use of steam power and electric power instead of horse or human power - all these things clearly represent economic progress.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Nothing fails like success because we don't learn from it. We learn only from failure.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Humble, honest, ignorance is one of the finest flowers of the human spirit

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The thing that distinguishes social systems from physical or even biological systems is their incomparable (and embarrassing) richness in special cases. Generalizations in the social sciences are mere pathways which lead through a riotous forest of individual trees, each a species unto itself. The social scientist who loses this sense of the essential individuality and uniqueness of each case is all too likely to make a solemn scientific ass of himself, especially if he thinks that his faceless generalizations are the equivalents of the rich vareity of the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Almost every organization... exhibits two faces a smiling face which it turns toward its members and a frowning face which it turns to the world outside.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Any attempt to reduce the complex properties of biological organisms or of nervous systems or of human brains to simple physical and chemical systems is foolish.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Every culture, or subculture, is defined by a set of common values, that is, generally agreed upon preferences. Without a core of common values a culture cannot exist, and we classify society into cultures and subcultures precisely because it is possible to identify groups who have common values.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

DNA has been aptly described as the first three-dimensional Xerox machine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

[Peace praxis is] a peace process that deals with conflict integratively.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Conflict may be defined as a situation of competition in which the parties are aware of the incompatibility of potential future positions, and in which each party wishes to occupy a position that is incompatible with the wishes of the other.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Are we to regard the world of nature simply as a storehouse to be robbed for the immediate benefit of man? ... Does man have any responsibility for the preservation of a decent balance in nature, for the preservation of rare species, or even for the indefinite continuance of his race?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Integrative power [is] the ultimate power

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

A second possible approach to general systems theory is through the arrangement of theoretical systems and constructs in a hierarchy of complexity, roughly corresponding to the complexity of the "individuals" of the various empirical fields... leading towards a "system of systems." [...] I suggest below a possible arrangement of "levels" of theoretical discourse...(vi) [...] the "animal" level, characterized by increased mobility, teleological behavior and self-awareness...

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Canada has no cultural unity, no linguistic unity, no religious unity, no economic unity, no geographic unity. All it has is unity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The greater the penalties laid on sellers in the black market... the higher the black market price.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

One advantage of exhibiting a hierarchy of systems in this way is that it gives us some idea of the present gaps in both theoretical and empirical knowledge. Adequate theoretical models extend up to about the fourth level, and not much beyond. Empirical knowledge is deficient at practically all levels.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

It is almost as hard to define mathematics as it is to define economics, and one is tempted to fall back on the famous old definition attributed to Jacob Viner, "Economics is what economists do," and say that mathematics is what mathematicians do. A large part of mathematics deals with the formal relations of quantities or numbers.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

... the fouling of the nest which has been typical of man's activity in the past on a local scale now seems to be extending to the whole world society.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

[The integrative system] deals with such matters as respect, legitimacy, community, friendship, affection, love, and of course their opposites, across a broad scale of human relationships and interactions.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Even personal tastes are learned, in the matrix of a culture or a subculture in which we grow up, by very much the same kind of process by which we learn our common values. Purely personal tastes, indeed, can only survive in a culture which tolerates them, that is, which has a common value that private tastes of certain kinds should be allowed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

At the opposite pole from the gift is tribute - that is, a grant made out of fear and under threat. A threat is a statement of the form "you do something that I want or I will do something that you do not want.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

The World is a very complex system. It is easy to have too simple a view of it, and it is easy to do harm and to make things worse under the impulse to do good and make things better.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

[The consumer is] the supreme mover of economic order... for whom all goods are made and towards whom all economic activity is directed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

We should always bear in mind that numbers represent a simplification of reality.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

We never like to admit to ourselves that we have made a mistake. Organizational structures tend to accentuate this source of failure of information.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

A somewhat casual observer from outer space might well deduce that the course of evolution in this planet had produced a species of large four-wheeled bugs with detachable brains; peculiar animals which rested when they sent their brains away from them but performed in rather predictable manner when their brains were recalled.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

As far as many statistical series that are related to activities of mankind are concerned, the date that divides human history into two equal parts is well within living memory. The world of today is as different from the world I was born in as that world was from Julius Caesar s. I was born in the middle of human history, to date, roughly. Almost as much has happened since I was born as happened before.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

I shall argue that it is the capital stock from which we derive satisfaction, not from the additions to it (production) or the subtractions from it (consumption): that consumption, far from being a desideratum, is a deplorable property of the capital stock which necessitates the equally deplorable activity of production: and that the objective of economic policy should not be to maximize consumption or production, but rather to minimize it, i.e. to enable us to maintain our capital stock with as little consumption or production as possible.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Physicists only talk to physicists, economists to economists-worse still, nuclear physicists only talk to nuclear physicists and econometricians to econometricians. One wonders sometimes if science will not grind to a stop in an assemblage of walled-in hermits, each mumbling to himself words in a private language that only he can understand.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

With laissez-faire and price atomic, ecology's uneconomic, But with another kind of logic economy's unecologic.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Economists and technologists bring the "bits", but it requires the social scientists and humanists to bring the "wits.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenneth E. Boulding

Economists are like computers. They need to have facts punched into them.