Best 45 of Henry Parry Liddon quotes - MyQuotes

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Henry Parry Liddon
By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The resurrection asserts a truth which is by no means always written legibly for all men on the face of nature. It tells us that the spiritual is higher than the material; that in this universe spirit counts for more than matter.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

I get some very fierce anonymous letters about the Athanasian Creed, which would amuse you, if they were not so sad as to what they imply on the part of the writers. The last tells me that I am a Pharisee, and should have helped to crucify our Lord. It is very odd that people should think, much more write, such things; but the passion of unbelief is a very serious thing while it lasts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Useful knowledge, practical kindness, and beneficent laws -- these are not the Gospel; but, like philosophy, they are, or may be, its handmaids. They may make its task smooth and grateful; they may associate themselves with its victories, or they may prepare its way.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

If man looks within himself he must perceive two things: a law of right, and that which it condemns.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

A Christ upon paper, though it were the sacred pages of the Gospel, would have been as powerless to save Christendom as a Christ in fresco; not less feeble than the Countenance which, in the last stages of its decay, may be traced on the wall of the Refectory at Milan. A living Christ is the key to the phenomenon of Christian history.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The real difficulty with thousands in the present day is not that Christianity has been found wanting, but that it has never been seriously tried.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The great laws of the moral world do not vary, however different, under different dispensations, may be the authoritative enunciation of truth, or the means of propagating and defending it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Practically speaking, there are for each one of us two supreme realities -- God and the soul. The heavens and the earth will pass away. But the soul will still remain, face to face with God.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Worship is the earthly act by which we most distinctly recognize our personal immortality; men who think that they will be extinct a few years hence do not pray. In worship we spread out our insignificant life, which yet is the work of the Creator's hands, and the purchase of the Redeemer's blood, before the Eternal and All-Merciful, that we may learn the manners of a higher sphere, and fit ourselves for companionship with saints and angels, and for the everlasting sight of the face of God.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The purely material world seems to have more in common than we with the unchanging and everlasting years of the Great Creator. Yet we know that it is not so. In reality the rocks are less enduring than man. Each man's personal self will still survive for weal or woe, when another catastrophe shall have utterly changed the surface of this planet, and the elements shall have melted with fervent heat, and the earth also and all things that are therein shall have been burnt up.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

What we do upon a great occasion will probably depend upon what we already are; what we are will be the result of previous years of self-discipline, under the grace of Christ or the absence of it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Cats are like oysters, in that no one is neutral about them; everyone is, explicitly or implicitly, friendly or hostile to them. And they are like children in their power of discovering, by a rapid and sure instinct, who likes them and who does not. It is difficult to win their affection; and it is easy to forfeit what is hard to win. But when given, their love, although less demonstrative, is more delicate and beautiful than that of a dog.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

We may rightly shrink from saying that any given individual is certainly so unfaithful to light and grace as to incur the eternal loss of God, we do know that many are so. God knows who they are.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Let us think today of the prospect of sharing in a sublime and blessed existence such as is portrayed in the text of the Apocalypse before us, and let us ask ourselves whether it should or should not make any difference in our present state of being.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The history of the Church of Christ from the days of the Apostles has been a history of spiritual movements.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

No Legislature can really destroy a religious conviction, except by exterminating its holders. It is historically too late to do that, and we shall live to see the drowned Egyptians on the seashore even yet.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

A deliberate rejection of duty prescribed by already recognized truth cannot but destroy, or at least impair most seriously the clearness of our mental vision.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Liberalism itself, is, on all matters connected with Church and Education, only a kind of corporate and "respectable" ungodliness.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

But wherever we labour, the rule and the profession of the Apostle must be ours; and whatever be our personal mistakes and failures, God grant that our consciences may never accuse us of being ashamed of the Gospel of Christ.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

When the fields of human knowledge are so various and so vast as is the case in our day, the utmost that can be done by single minds not of encyclopedic range, is to master one subject or branch of subject as thoroughly as possible, and to rest content with knowing that others are working in regions where neither time nor strength will permit us to enter.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The life of man is made up of action and endurance; the life is fruitful in the ratio in which it is laid out in noble action or in patient perseverance.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Again and again the Church of Christ has been all but engulfed, as men might have deemed, in the billows; again and again the storm has been calmed by the Master, Who had seemed for awhile to sleep.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Nothing is really lost by a life of sacrifice; everything is lost by failure to obey God's call.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

It is only Jesus Christ who has thrown light on life and immortality through the gospel; and because He has done so, and has enabled us by His atoning death and intercession to make the most of this discovery, His gospel is, for all who will, a power of God unto salvation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Often enough it is little that can be done in an old country, where life is ruled by fixed and imperious traditions; while much may be done where all is yet fluid, and where, if religion is sometimes unprotected and unrecognised, she is not embarrassed by influences which deaden or cramp her best energies at home.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Prayer is the act by which man, detaching himself from the embarrassments of sense and nature, ascends to the true level of his destiny.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

What we do on some great occasion will probably depend on what we already are; and what we are will be the result of previous years of self-discipline.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Worship is the common sense of faith in a life to come; and the hours we devote to it will assuredly be among those upon which we shall reflect with most thankful joy when all things here shall have fallen into a very distant background, and when through the Atoning Mercy our true home has been reached at last.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

We cannot think that God frightens us with threatenings which He really does not mean to carry out, without doing Himself obvious dishonour.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

How do I know that there is a God? In the same way that I know, on looking at the sand, when a man or beast has crossed the desert - by His footprints in the world around me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Augustine of Hippo used to say that, but for God's grace, he should have been capable of committing any crime; and it is when we feel this sincerely, that we are most likely to be really improving, and best able to give assistance to others without moral loss to ourselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The Church of the Apostles was a Church of the poor; of silver and gold it had none.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

As all true virtue, wherever found, is a ray of the life of the All-Holy; so all solid knowledge, all really accurate thought, descends from the Eternal Reason, and ought, when we apprehend it, to guide us upwards to Him.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Truth has her sterner responsibilities sooner or later in store for those who have known anything about her.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Look to the end; and resolve to make the service of Christ the first object in what remains of life, without indifference to the opinion of your fellow men, but also without fear of it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

If a religious principle is worth anything, it applies to a million of human beings as truly as to one; and the difficulty of insisting on its wider application does not furnish any proof that it ought not to be so applied.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Patriotism is a virtue, no doubt: and it is a duty to cherish patriotism in ourselves and others. But patriotism means wishing well to our country, and the question is what is this "well". Lord Beaconsfield would say "material prosperity, grandeur, increase of power and territory"; Mr. Gladstone would say "that our country may act virtuously". If patriotism is an extension of the feeling which we have about our relatives, Mr. Gladstone is surely right; we wish our relatives to be good men in the first instance, and then successful men, if success is compatible with goodness. I cannot understand how many excellent people fail to feel thus about their country too; it would seem to me that exactly in the proportion in which we realise the fact that a nation is only a very overgrown family which has kept open house for some centuries will be our anxiety that this country should act as a good man would act; and that patriotism consists in wishing this.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

As a man passes into middle life, or beyond it, autumn, it has been said, whispers more to his soul than any other season of the natural year. It is not difficult to see why this should be.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

So long as men die, life will reassert its tragic interest from time to time with fresh energy, and to this interest Christianity alone can respond. If the scientific people could rid us of death, they might indeed hope to win over the heart and conscience of the world, permanently, to some form of non-theistic speculation. As it is, the tide ebbs, as I believe, only that it may flow again.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

Certainly, envy is no monopoly of the poor; it makes itself felt in all sections of society; it haunts the court, the library, the barrack-room, even the sanctuary; it is provoked in some unhappy souls by the near neighbourhood of any superior rank or excellence whatever.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

If we might reverently imagine ourselves scheming beforehand what kind of book the Book of God ought to be, how different would it be from the actual Bible! There would be as many Bibles as there are souls, and they would differ as widely. But in one thing, amid all their differences, they would probably agree: they would lack the variety, both in form and substance, of the Holy Book which the Church of God places in the hands of her children.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

No light privilege is it to have a hand in building up the moral life of these new communities; no common honour surely to help to lay side by side with the foundations of their free political institutions the broad and deep foundations of the Church of God.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

The truth is I suppose that a tour lays in a great stock of thought and spirits for the future; the fatigue and drawbacks of actual travelling are forgotten and a bright residuum remains.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

A few years hence and he will be beneath the sod; but those cliffs will stand, as now, facing the ocean, incessantly lashed by its waves, yet unshaken, immovable; and other eyes will gaze on them for their brief day of life, and then they, too, will close.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Parry Liddon

It is some disaster for any mind to hold any one thing for truth that is untrue, however insignificant it be, or however honestly it be held. It is a greater disaster when the false prejudice bars the way to some truth behind it, which, but for it, would find an entrance to the soul; and the greatness of the disaster will in this case be measured by the importance of the excluded truth.