Best 21 of Wilfrid Laurier quotes - MyQuotes

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Wilfrid Laurier
By Anonym 14 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

The Englishman respects your opinions, but he never thinks of your feelings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

I am quite prepared, if we can do it without any disrespect to the Crown of England, to bring our titles to the marketplace and make a bonfire of them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Canada is free and freedom is its nationality.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

The Divinity could be invoked as well in the English language as in the French.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

The twentieth century belongs to Canada.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Why, so soon as French Canadians, who are in the minority in this House and in the country, were to organize as a political party, they would compel the majority to organize as a political party, and the result must be disastrous to themselves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

I claim for Canada this, that in future Canada shall be at liberty to act or not act, to interfere or not interfere, to do just as she pleases, and that she shall reserve to herself the right to judge whether or not there is cause for her to act.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

For us, sons of France, political sentiment is a passion; while, for the Englishmen, politics are a question of business.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

A colony, yet a nation - words never before in the history of the world associated together.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

What is hateful is not rebellion but the despotism which induces the rebellion; what is hateful are not rebels but the men, who, having the enjoyment of power, do not discharge the duties of power; they are the men who, having the power to redress wrongs, refuse to listen to the petitioners that are sent to them; they are the men who, when they are asked for a loaf, give a stone.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Canada first, Canada last, Canada always.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

I am not here to parade my religious sentiments, but I declare I have too much respect for the faith in which I was born to ever use it as the basis of a political organization

By Anonym 14 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

It is a sound principle of finance, and a still sounder principle of government, that those who have the duty of expending the revenue of a country should also be saddled with the responsibility of levying and providing it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Quebec does not have Opinions, but only sentiments.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

I am a subject of the British Crown, but whenever I have to choose between the interests of England and Canada it is manifest to me that the interests of my country are identical with those of the United States of America.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

It would be simply suicidal to French Canadians to form a party by themselves.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

We French-Canadians belong to one country, Canada: Canada is for us the whole world: but the English-Canadians have two countries, one here and one across the sea.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

I have been represented as a Protestant minister; there was not one of the canvassers of the honourable gentlemen opposite that did not represent to the people that I was not a Minister of the Crown, but that I was a Protestant minister

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

We are here a nation, composed of the most heterogeneous elements-Protestants and Catholics, English, French, German, Irish, Scotch, every one, let it be remembered, with his traditions, with his prejudices. In each of these conflicting antagonistic elements, however, there is a common spot of patriotism, and the only true policy is that which reaches that common patriotism and makes it vibrate in all toward common ends and common aspirations.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Whether splendidly isolated or dangerously isolated, I will not now debate; but for my part, I think splendidly isolated, because the isolation of England comes from her superiority.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wilfrid Laurier

Confederation is a compact, made originally by four provinces but adhered to by all the nine provinces who have entered it, and I submit to the judgment of this house and to the best consideration of its members, that this compact should not be lightly altered.