Best 369 of Plutarch quotes - MyQuotes

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Plutarch
By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Not by lamentations and mournful chants ought we to celebrate the funeral of a good man, but by hymns; for, ion ceasing to be numbered with mortals, he enters upon the heritage of a diviner life. Since he is gone where he feels no pain, let us not indulge in too much grief. The soul is incapable of death. And he, like a bird not long enough in his cage to become attached to it, is free to fly away to a purer air. . . . Since we cherish a trust like this, let our outward actions be in accord with it, and let us keep our hearts pure and our minds calm.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Of the land which the Romans gained by conquest from their neighbours, part they sold publicly, and turned the remainder into common; this common land they assigned to such of the citizens as were poor and indigent, for which they were to pay only a small acknowledgment into the public treasury. But when the wealthy men began to offer larger rents, and drive the poorer people out, it was enacted by law that no person whatever should enjoy more than five hundred acres of ground.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Plutarch

To make an action honorable, it ought to be agreeable to the age, and other circumstances of the person; since it is circumstance and proper measure that give an action its character, and make it either good or bad.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Plutarch

When someone blamed Hecataeus the sophist because that, being invited to the public table, he had not spoken one word all supper-time, Archidamidas answered in his vindication 'He who knows how to speak, knows also when'.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Music, to create harmony, must investigate discord.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

When Demaratus was asked whether he held his tongue because he was a fool or for want of words, he replied, "A fool cannot hold his tongue.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

While Leonidas was preparing to make his stand, a Persian envoy arrived. The envoy explained to Leonidas the futility of trying to resist the advance of the Great King's army and demanded that the Greeks lay down their arms and submit to the might of Persia. Leonidas laconically told Xerxes, "Come and get them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

I, for my part, wonder of what sort of feeling, mind or reason that man was possessed who was first to pollute his mouth with gore, and to allow his lips to touch the flesh of a murdered being: who spread his table with the mangled forms of dead bodies, and claimed as daily food and dainty dishes what but now were beings endowed with movement, perception and with voice. …but for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh, we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that portion of life and time it had been born in to the world to enjoy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Nothing is cheap which is superfluous, for what one does not need, is dear at a penny.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Nothing exists in the intellect that has not first gone through the senses.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

But virtue, by the bare statement of its actions, can so affect men's minds as to create at once both admiration of the things done and desire to imitate the doers of them. The goods of fortune we would possess and would enjoy; those of virtue we long to practise and exercise. We are content to receive the former from others, the latter we wish others to experience from us. Moral good is a practical stimulus; it is no sooner seen, than it inspires an impulse to practice, and influences the mind and character not by a mere imitation which we look at, but by the statement of the fact creates a moral purpose which we form.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The Epicureans, according to whom animals had no creation, doe suppose that by mutation of one into another, they were first made; for they are the substantial part of the world; like as Anaxagoras and Euripides affirme in these tearmes: nothing dieth, but in changing as they doe one for another they show sundry formes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Courage consists not in hazarding without fear; but being resolutely minded in a just cause.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Medicine to produce health must examine disease; and music, to create harmony must investigate discord.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Do not speak of your happiness to one less fortunate than yourself.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Knavery is the best defense against a knave.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Not by lamentations and mournful chants ought we to celebrate the funeral of a good man, but by hymns, for in ceasing to be numbered with mortals he enters upon the heritage of a diviner life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The man who first brought ruin upon the Roman people was he who pampered them by largesses and amusements.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

Being consulted again whether it were requisite to enclose the city with a wall, [Lycurgus] sent them word, 'The city is well fortified which hath a wall of men instead of brick'.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

There were two brothers called Both and Either; perceiving Either was a good, understanding, busy fellow, and Both a silly fellow and good for little, Philip said, "Either is both, and Both is neither.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

For the rich men without scruple drew the estate into their own hands, excluding the rightful heirs from their succession; and all the wealth being centred upon the few, the generality were poor and miserable. Honourable pursuits, for which there was no longer leisure, were neglected; the state was filled with sordid business, and with hatred and envy of the rich.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

An imbalance between rich and poor is the oldest and most fatal ailment of all republics.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Note that the eating of flesh is not only physically against nature, but it also makes us spiritually coarse and gross by reason of satiety and surfeit.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

What most of all enables a man to serve the public is not wealth, but content and independence; which, requiring no superfluity at home, distracts not the mind from the common good.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

A human body in no way resembles those that were born for ravenousness; it hath no hawk’s bill, no sharp talon, no roughness of teeth, no such strength of stomach or heat of digestion, as can be sufficient to convert or alter such heavy and fleshy fare. But if you will contend that you were born to an inclination to such food as you have now a mind to eat, do you then yourself kill what you would eat. But do it yourself, without the help of a chopping-knife, mallet or axe, as wolves, bears, and lions do, who kill and eat at once. Rend an ox with thy teeth, worry a hog with thy mouth, tear a lamb or a hare in pieces, and fall on and eat it alive as they do. But if thou had rather stay until what thou eat is to become dead, and if thou art loath to force a soul out of its body, why then dost thou against nature eat an animate thing? There is nobody that is willing to eat even a lifeless and a dead thing even as it is; so they boil it, and roast it, and alter it by fire and medicines, as it were, changing and quenching the slaughtered gore with thousands of sweet sauces, that the palate being thereby deceived may admit of such uncouth fare.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

It is a thing of no great difficulty to raise objections against another man's oration, it is a very easy matter; but to produce a better in it's place is a work extremely troublesome.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

... being perpetually charmed by his familiar siren, that is, by his geometry, he neglected to eat and drink and took no care of his person; that he was often carried by force to the baths, and when there he would trace geometrical figures in the ashes of the fire, and with his finger draws lines upon his body when it was anointed with oil, being in a state of great ecstasy and divinely possessed by his science.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

He is a fool who lets slip a bird in the hand for a bird in the bush.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Phocion compared the speeches of Leosthenes to cypress-trees. "They are tall," said he, "and comely, but bear no fruit.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Let a prince be guarded with soldiers, attended by councillors, and shut up in forts; yet if his thoughts disturb him, he is miserable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Silence is an answer to a wise man.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Real excellence, indeed, is most recognized when most openly looked into.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

When Demosthenes was asked what was the first part of Oratory, he answered, "Action," and which was the second, he replied, "action," and which was the third, he still answered "Action.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The abuse of buying and selling votes crept in and money began to play an important part in determining elections. Later on, this process of corruption spread to the law courts. And then to the army, and finally the Republic was subjected to the rule of emperors

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Courage and wisdom are, indeed, rarities amongst men, but of all that is good, a just man it would seem is the most scarce.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Knowledge of divine things for the most part, as Heraclitus says, is lost to us by incredulity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

We rich men count our felicity and happiness to lie in these superfluities, and not in those necessary things.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Politics is not like an ocean voyage or a military campaign... something which leaves off as soon as reached. It is not a public chore to be gotten over with. It is a way of life.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

He is a fool who leaves things close at hand to follow what is out of reach.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

As geographers, Sosius, crowd into the edges of their maps parts of the world which they do not know about, adding notes in the margin to the effect that beyond this lies nothing but sandy deserts full of wild beasts, and unapproachable bogs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

That proverbial saying, "Ill news goes quick and far.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Playing the Cretan with the Cretans (i.e. lying to liars).

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Justice makes the life of such as are in prosperity, power and authority the life of a god, and injustice turns it to that of a beast.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

To Harmodius, descended from the ancient Harmodius, when he reviled Iphicrates [a shoemaker's son] for his mean birth, "My nobility," said he, "begins in me, but yours ends in you.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

All men whilst they are awake are in one common world: but each of them, when he is asleep, is in a world of his own.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The crowns of kings do not prevent those who wear them from being tormented sometimes by violent headaches.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Anger turns the mind out of doors and bolts the entrance.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

It is not histories I am writing, but lives; and in the most glorious deeds there is not always an indication of virtue or vice, indeed a small thing like a phrase or a jest often makes a greater revelation of a character than battles where thousands die.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The drop hollows out the stone not by strength, but by constant falling.