Best 369 of Plutarch quotes - MyQuotes

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Plutarch
By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Cicero called Aristotle a river of flowing gold, and said of Plato's Dialogues, that if Jupiter were to speak, it would be in language like theirs.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Plutarch

The fact is that men who know nothing of decency in their own lives are only too ready to launch foul slanders against their betters and to offer them up as victims to the evil deity of popular envy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Seeing the lightest and gayest purple was then most in fashion, he would always wear that which was the nearest black; and he would often go out of doors, after his morning meal, without either shoes or tunic; not that he sought vain-glory from such novelties, but he would accustom himself to be ashamed only of what deserves shame, and to despise all other sorts of disgrace.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

We ought to give our friend pain if it will benefit him, but not to the extent of breaking off our friendship; but just as we make use of some biting medicine that will save and preserve the life of the patient. And so the friend, like a musician, in bringing about an improvement to what is good and expedient, sometimes slackens the chords, sometimes tightens them, and is often pleasant, but always useful.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The flatterer's object is to please in everything he does; whereas the true friend always does what is right, and so often gives pleasure, often pain, not wishing the latter, but not shunning it either, if he deems it best.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

As Meander says, "For our mind is God;" and as Heraclitus, "Man's genius is a deity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The measure of a man is the way he bears up under misfortune.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Not by lamentations and mournful chants ought we to celebrate the funeral of a good man, but by hymns, for in ceasing to be numbered with mortals he enters upon the heritage of a diviner life.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Plutarch

Small, therefore, can we think the progress we have made, as long as our admiration for those who have done noble things is barren, and does not of itself incite us to imitate them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The old proverb was now made good, "the mountain had brought forth a mouse.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Instead of using medicine, better fast today.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

To be ignorant of the lives of the most celebrated men of antiquity is to continue in a state of childhood all our days.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Plutarch

Sertorius rose up and spoke to his army, “You see, fellow soldiers, that perseverance is more prevailing than violence, and that many things which cannot be overcome when they are together, yield themselves up when taken little by little. Assiduity and persistence are irresistible, and in time overthrow and destroy the greatest powers whatever. Time being the favorable friend and assistant of those who use their judgment to await his occasions, and the destructive enemy of those who are unseasonably urging and pressing forward.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

We are more sensible of what is done against custom than against nature.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The obligations of law and equity reach only to mankind; but kindness and beneficence should be extended to the creatures of every species, and these will flow from the breast of a true man, as streams that issue from the living fountain.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Nothing exists in the intellect that has not first gone through the senses.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Empire may be gained by gold, not gold by empire. It used, indeed, to be a proverb that "It is not Philip, but Philip's gold that takes the cities of Greece.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Antagoras the poet was boiling a conger, and Antigonus, coming behind him as he was stirring his skillet, said, "Do you think, Antagoras, that Homer boiled congers when he wrote the deeds of Agamemnon?" Antagoras replied, "Do you think, O king, that Agamemnon, when he did such exploits, was a peeping in his army to see who boiled congers?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The human heart becomes softened by hearing of instances of gentleness and consideration.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The pilot cannot mitigate the billows or calm the winds.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

To conduct great matters and never commit a fault is above the force of human nature.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

There are two sentences inscribed upon the Ancient oracle... "Know thyself" and "Nothing too much"; and upon these all other precepts depend.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

But the Lacedaemonians, who make it their first principle of action to serve their country's interest, know not any thing to be just or unjust by any measure but that.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

It is a hard matter, my fellow citizens, to argue with the belly, since it has no ears.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Plutarch

It is no great wonder if in long process of time, while fortune takes her course hither and thither, numerous coincidences should spontaneously occur. If the number and variety of subjects to be wrought upon be infinite, it is all the more easy for fortune, with such an abundance of material, to effect this similarity of results. Or if, on the other hand, events are limited to the combinations of some finite number, then of necessity the same must often recur, and in the same sequence.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

After the battle in Pharsalia, when Pompey was fled, one Nonius said they had seven eagles left still, and advised to try what they would do. "Your advice," said Cicero, "were good if we were to fight jackdaws.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Philosophy is the art of living.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

It is part of a good man to do great and noble deeds, though he risk everything.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Gout is not relieved by a fine shoe nor a hangnail by a costly ring nor migraine by a tiara.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Music, to create harmony, must investigate discord.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Antisthenes says that in a certain faraway land the cold is so intense that words freeze as soon as they are uttered, and after some time then thaw and become audible, so that words spoken in winter go unheard until the next summer.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Men who marry wives very much superior to themselves are not so truly husbands to their wives as they are unawares made slaves to their position.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Good birth is a fine thing, but the merit is our ancestors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

We ought to regard books as we do sweetmeats, not wholly to aim at the pleasantest, but chiefly to respect the wholesomest; not forbidding either, but approving the latter most.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

A prating barber asked Archelaus how he would be trimmed. He answered, "In silence.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The generous mind adds dignity to every act, and nothing misbecomes it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

Wickedness is a wonderfully diligent architect of misery, of shame, accompanied with terror, and commotion, and remorse, and endless perturbation.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The talkative listen to no one, for they are ever speaking. And the first evil that attends those who know not to be silent is that they hear nothing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

I, for my part, wonder of what sort of feeling, mind or reason that man was possessed who was first to pollute his mouth with gore, and to allow his lips to touch the flesh of a murdered being: who spread his table with the mangled forms of dead bodies, and claimed as daily food and dainty dishes what but now were beings endowed with movement, perception and with voice. …but for the sake of some little mouthful of flesh, we deprive a soul of the sun and light, and of that portion of life and time it had been born in to the world to enjoy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

The abuse of buying and selling votes crept in and money began to play an important part in determining elections. Later on, this process of corruption spread to the law courts. And then to the army, and finally the Republic was subjected to the rule of emperors

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Epaminondas is reported wittily to have said of a good man that died about the time of the battle of Leuctra, "How came he to have so much leisure as to die, when there was so much stirring?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Courage and wisdom are, indeed, rarities amongst men, but of all that is good, a just man it would seem is the most scarce.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Politics is not like an ocean voyage or a military campaign... something which leaves off as soon as reached. It is not a public chore to be gotten over with. It is a way of life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

No beast is more savage than man when possessed with power answerable to his rage.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

The soul of man... is a portion or a copy of the soul of the Universe and is joined together on principles and in proportions corresponding to those which govern the Universe.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plutarch

Pompey bade Sylla recollect that more worshipped the rising than the setting sun.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

When Demosthenes was asked what was the first part of Oratory, he answered, "Action," and which was the second, he replied, "action," and which was the third, he still answered "Action.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plutarch

Being summoned by the Athenians out of Sicily to plead for his life, Alcibiades absconded, saying that that criminal was a fool who studied a defence when he might fly for it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plutarch

These Macedonians are a rude and clownish people; they call a spade a spade.