Best 1 852 of Crime quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 20 Sep

Patricia Cornwell

When I first studied the photographs I could not tell what she looked like or even the color of her hair. All I saw was red.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Elmore Leonard

I always felt, you don’t have a good time doin crime, you may as well find a job.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sierra D. Waters

It is not a single crime when a child is photographed while sexually assaulted (raped.) It is a life time crime that should have life time punishments attached to it. If the surviving child is, more often than not, going to suffer for life for the crime(s) committed against them, shouldn't the pedophiles suffer just as long? If it often takes decades for survivors to come to terms with exactly how much damage was caused to them, why are there time limits for prosecution?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Christopher Fowler

The clouds of night opened like ink blossoming in water.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Inman

It was a nice name. It would look good on a tombstone.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Foxy Brown

The only crime I'm guilty of is being a young black woman.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sheeja Jose

Love at first sight is a polite phrase used when one wants to fuck a stranger.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Andrew Young

It stands to reason that unloved and unwanted children are going to get into crime.

By Anonym 16 Sep

S. A. Tawks

I wasn't pissed off; I was just robbed of most of the cocky confidence my cunningness had created.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jack Kevorkian

Dying is not a crime.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Stefan Zweig

Farklı hisseden, farklı hassasiyetlere sahip ve farkındalığı güçlenmiş başka bir insan haline geldiğimi biliyorum. Daha iyi bir insan olduğumu iddia edecek cesaretim yok elbette, ama daha mutlu bir insan olduğumu biliyorum, çünkü o buz gibi donuk hayatım için yeni bir anlam buldum, yaşamın kendisinden başka bir sözcükle açıklayamayacağım bir anlam. Ait olduğum kesimin normlarını ve kalıplarını boş bulduğum için artık ne kendimden ne de başkalarından utanıyorum. Onur, suç, günah gibi kavramlar bir anda soğuk, metalsi bir tını kazandı, bunları dehşete kapılmadan telaffuz edemiyorum artık.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Andrew Barrett

No one mentioned the sad piece of tinsel, naked in places, hanging across the chimneybreast, nor that Twelfth Night was a week ago. No one mentioned the two Christmas cards on the mantelpiece. No one mentioned them because inside they were blank.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Brenna Ehrlich

Shirts and jeans litter the asphalt, the empty fabric limbs askew as if they're attempting to escape. Blood smears Sarah's lips as she struggles against the chest of a dirty looking man with a beard. Terror. Terror is the only word my mind can seize on and it forgets what it means. I forget how to think - to move.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michael Salter

Frosh (2002) has suggested that therapeutic spaces provide children and adults with the rare opportunity to articulate experiences that are otherwise excluded from the dominant symbolic order. However, since the 1990s, post-modern and post-structural theory has often been deployed in ways that attempt to ‘manage’ from; afar the perturbing disclosures of abuse and trauma that arise in therapeutic spaces (Frosh 2002). Nowhere is this clearer than in relation to organised abuse, where the testimony of girls and women has been deconstructed as symptoms of cultural hysteria (Showalter 1997) and the colonisation of women’s minds by therapeutic discourse (Hacking 1995). However, behind words and discourse, ‘a real world and real lives do exist, howsoever we interpret, construct and recycle accounts of these by a variety of symbolic means’ (Stanley 1993: 214). Summit (1994: 5) once described organised abuse as a ‘subject of smoke and mirrors’, observing the ways in which it has persistently defied conceptualisation or explanation. Explanations for serious or sadistic child sex offending have typically rested on psychiatric concepts of ‘paedophilia’ or particular psychological categories that have limited utility for the study of the cultures of sexual abuse that emerge in the families or institutions in which organised abuse takes pace. For those clinicians and researchers who take organised abuse seriously, their reliance upon individualistic rather than sociological explanations for child sexual abuse has left them unable to explain the emergence of coordinated, and often sadistic, multi—perpetrator sexual abuse in a range of contexts around the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Elizabeth Keckley

For an act may be wrong judged purely by itself, but when the motive that prompted the act is understood, it is construed differently. I lay it down as an axiom, that only that is criminal in the sight of God where crime is meditated.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Steen Langstrup

Meet me tonight, six o’clock sharp, at the gates of the municipal hospital. It is very important that you are precise. Not five minutes early, not five minutes late. In case I’m not there, you leave straight away. Got it?” Ingrid aka ‘Alis K’ The Informer

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charlotte Perkins Gilman

It is the inextricable masculinity in our idea of government which so revolts at the idea of women as voters. 'To govern:' that means to boss, to control, to have authority; and that only, to most minds. They cannot bear to think of the woman as having control over even their own affairs; to control is masculine, they assume. Seeing only self-interest as a natural impulse, and the ruling powers of the state as a sort of umpire, an authority to preserve the rules of the game while men fight it out forever; they see in a democracy merely a wider range of self interest, a wider, freer field to fight in.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Bertrand Russell

Many of the actions by which men have become rich are far more harmful to the community than the obscure crimes of poor men, yet they go unpunished because they do not interfere with the existing order.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michael Connelly

He [Harry Bosch] defined good company not by the conversation but by the lack of it. When there was no need to talk to feel comfortable, that was the right company

By Anonym 18 Sep

S. A. Tawks

Reassuring thoughts have a funny way of getting stuck on repeat. Then you wake up one day and you can't remember where you put the last thirty years of your life.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Allan Pinkerton

A friend to honesty and a foe to crime

By Anonym 18 Sep

Justin K. Mcfarlane Beau

The grandeur of the thieving falsity is larceny, the fall of cities.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Albert Camus

How many crimes have been committed for no other reason than that the perpetrator could not bear being in the wrong!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mokokoma Mokhonoana

I am against justice … whenever it is carried out by a mob.

By Anonym 17 Sep

J. M. Coetzee

Obwohl diese afrikanischen Militärbanden oft nicht größer oder mächtiger sind als die organisierten kriminellen Banden in Asien oder Osteuropa, wird über ihre Aktivitäten in den Medien - sogar in den westlichen Medien - unter der Rubrik Politik (Geschehen aus aller Welt) respektvoll berichtet, statt unter der Rubrik Verbrechen.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Abdul Kalam

How accurately can the law fix the crime? There has to be a mechanism for very fast action. The law is like this: catch them and punish them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Johnson

He that voluntarily continues in ignorance, is guilty of all the crimes which ignorance produces.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jane Casey

Because of course, for every revelation of weakness, there had to be an equal and opposite show of strength.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dorothy Gilman

Drama!" said Mr. Hitchens. Robin Shrugged. "That's what terrorism is, basically--pure theater. Nothing in particular is ever accomplished by it, other than to focus attention on a small group of people who seize absolute power by threatening everything that holds civilization together." "Absolute power," mused Mrs. Pollifax. "Like monstrous children thumbing their noses at adults who live by codes and laws and scruples." Robin said in a hard voice, "In my line of work I've tangled with narcotic dealers and suppliers--that's Interpol's job--and I can say of them that at least they give value for their money. If what they sell destroys human lives their victims cooperate by choice in their own destruction, and if drug dealers bend and break every law in the book they at least know the laws. "But terrorists--" He shook his head. "They're the parasites of the century. They want to make a statement, they simply toss a bomb or round up innocent people to hold hostage, or kill without compunction, remorse or compassion. If they need money, they simply rob a bank. I have to admit not only my contempt for them," he added, "but my fear, too, because their only passion is to mock and to destroy, and that really is frightening.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Zita Steele

No more lip from you. Otherwise there might be a misunderstanding.” Kika eyed the door. She considered making an escape. “Oh…I forgot to mention something. It’s terribly stormy outside tonight,” said Mitch, with an ominously sweet smile. “It’s raining bullets.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sara Sheridan

Google maps are one thing but there's no substitute for pounding the beat and I spent quite a bit of time figuring out how to break into the back of the houses on Belgrave Place. Once I even for followed by a suspicious householder - I'd been hanging around staring at the exterior of his flat for too long.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Michael Prelee

Did he seem crazy?" Captain Geechy seemed perplexed. "No. He was quite calm and businesslike, actually. Why do you ask?" "I ask because his plan to get rich involves hijacking a starship full of dead people," she said. "That seems like the act of someone who isn't in their right mind. It concerns me that someone not in their right mind is holding me hostage.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Narendra Modi

Importance of technology is increasing every day, we must not deprive our children of technology, if we do then it's a social crime.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ted Bundy

Society wants to believe it can identify evil people, or bad or harmful people, but it's not practical. There are no stereotypes.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Steve Maraboli

Sometimes love can be both the punishment and the crime.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Geoffrey S. Fletcher

The brutality that can take place in a crime film heightens the tenderness that can also be there.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sanjida Kay

It’s quiet in the suburbs. It’s too cold for people to be in their gardens; and it’s not a thoroughfare so few cars drive by. I look past decaying roses and through the first flush of Michelmas daisies, blazing a glorious purple, into the darkened windows of the houses we walk by. Who lives here? Are they watching us? Did one of our neighbours do something seven years ago that he now regrets? How little we know of the people who surround us.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Michael Salter

As mandatory reporting laws and community awareness drove an increase its child protection investigations throughout the 1980s, some children began to disclose premeditated, sadistic and organised abuse by their parents, relatives and other caregivers such as priests and teachers (Hechler 1988). Adults in psychotherapy described similar experiences. The dichotomies that had previously associated organised abuse with the dangerous, external ‘Other’ had been breached, and the incendiary debate that followed is an illustration of the depth of the collective desire to see them restored. Campbell (1988) noted the paradox that, whilst journalists and politicians often demand that the authorities respond more decisively in response to a ‘crisis’ of sexual abuse, the action that is taken is then subsequently construed as a ‘crisis’. There has been a particularly pronounced tendency of the public reception to allegations of organised abuse. The removal of children from their parents due to disclosures of organised abuse, the provision of mental health care to survivors of organised abuse, police investigations of allegations of organised abuse and the prosecution of alleged perpetrators of organised abuse have all generated their own controversies. These were disagreements that were cloaked in the vocabulary of science and objectivity but nonetheless were played out in sensationalised fashion on primetime television, glossy news magazines and populist books, drawing textual analysis. The role of therapy and social work in the construction of testimony of abuse and trauma. in particular, has come under sustained postmodern attack. Frosh (2002) has suggested that therapeutic spaces provide children and adults with the rare opportunity to articulate experiences that are otherwise excluded from the dominant symbolic order. However, since the 1990s, post-modern and post-structural theory has often been deployed in ways that attempt to ‘manage’ from; afar the perturbing disclosures of abuse and trauma that arise in therapeutic spaces (Frosh 2002). Nowhere is this clearer than in relation to organised abuse, where the testimony of girls and women has been deconstructed as symptoms of cultural hysteria (Showalter 1997) and the colonisation of women’s minds by therapeutic discourse (Hacking 1995). However, behind words and discourse, ‘a real world and real lives do exist, howsoever we interpret, construct and recycle accounts of these by a variety of symbolic means’ (Stanley 1993: 214). Summit (1994: 5) once described organised abuse as a ‘subject of smoke and mirrors’, observing the ways in which it has persistently defied conceptualisation or explanation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Josh Lieb

Crime is for poor people. You don't need to rob the bank if you own it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mike Sullivan

Everywhere on our planet one hand greases another. Often it's done with a bloated face, wearing a serpent's smile. M.Sullivan

By Anonym 17 Sep

Martin Hopkins

Nothing is ‘wrong’ with me, Dan. What’s wrong with you? she said in the same eerily quiet voice, dark eyes fixated on Dan, as she breathed heavily.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Anam Iqbal

This was different, spontaneous, unrestricted. This was what dancing was supposed to feel like - like freedom.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Emile M. Cioran

If, at the limit, you can rule without crime, you cannot do so without injustices.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Benjamin Harrison

The disfranchisement of a single legal elector by fraud or intimidation is a crime too grave to be regarded lightly.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Samuel Johnson

Governors being accustomed to hear of more crimes than they can punish, and more wrongs than they can redress, set themselves at ease by indiscriminate negligence, and presently forget the request when they lose sight of the petitioner.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Margaret Cho

Let's not hate ourselves. We are all we have. ... I have been a longtime perpetrator of hate crimes against myself, and I am turning myself in. I have had enough.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert Hughes

He had been always escaping, always rebelling, always fighting against authority, and always being flogged. There had been a whole lifetime of torment such as this; forty-two years of it; and there he stood, speaking softly, arguing his case well, and pleading while the tears ran down his face for some kindness, for some mercy in his old age. 'I have tried to escape; always to escape,' he said, 'as a bird does out of a cage. Is that unnatural; is that a great crime?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Oliver Harris

I liked the idea of a person shedding their life, and someone else putting it on. -Oliver Harris on writing The Hollow Man for Crime Time online magazine

By Anonym 14 Sep

Antoine Jacques Claude Joseph

It is worse than a crime, it is a blunder.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Michael Connelly

Trust no one. You may be working with the last honest cop in Mexicali, but why bet your life on it?