Best 144 of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley quotes - MyQuotes

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

There is something so different in Venice from any other place in the world, that you leave at once all accustomed habits and everyday sights to enter an enchanted garden.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

My candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I could not understand why men who knew all about good and evil could hate and kill each other.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

From my birth I have aspired like the eagle - but unlike the eagle, my wings have failed. . . . Congratulate me then that I have found a fitting scope for my powers.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

marriage is usually considered the grave, and not the cradle of love.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Solitude becomes a sort of tangible enemy, the more dangerous, because it dwells within the citadel itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Even where the affections are not strongly moved by any superior excellence, the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain. They know our infantine dispositions, which, however they may be afterwards modified, are never eradicated; and they can judge of our actions with more certain conclusions as to the integrity of our motives.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

My food is not that of man; I do not destroy the lamb and the kid to glut my appetite; acorns and berries afford me sufficient nourishment.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

If our impulses were confined to hunger, thirst, and desire, we might be nearly free; but now we are moved by every wind that blows and a chance word or scene that that word may convey to us.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The agony of my feelings allowed me no respite; no incident occurred from which my rage and misery could not extract its food.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

. . . the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

How dreadful it is, to emerge from the oblivion of slumber, and to receive as a good morrow the mute wailing of one's own hapless heart - to return from the land of deceptive dreams to the heavy knowledge of unchanged disaster!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I felt emotions of gentleness and pleasure, that had long appeared dead, revive within me. Half surprised by the novelty of these sensations, I allowed myself to be borne away by them, and forgetting my solitude and deformity, dared to be happy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

A solitary being is by instinct a wanderer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Every where I see bliss, from which I alone am irrevocably excluded.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of a void, but out of chaos; the materials must in the first place be afforded; it can give form to dark, shapeless substances, but cannot bring into being the substance itself.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Oh! Be men, or be more than men. Be steady to your purposes and firm as a rock. This ice is not made of such stuff as your hearts may be; it is mutable and cannot withstand you if you say that it shall not. Do not return to your families with the stigma of disgrace marked on your brows. Return as heroes who have fought and conquered, and who know not what it is to turn their backs on the foe.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Polluted by crimes, and torn by the bitterest remorse, where can I find rest but in death?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

But he found that a traveller's life is one that includes much pain amidst its enjoyments. His feelings are for ever on the stretch; and when he begins to sink into repose, he finds himself obliged to quit that on which he rests in pleasure for something new, which again engages his attention, and which also he forsakes for other novelties.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I feel exquisite pleasure in dwelling on the recollections of childhood, before misfortune had tainted my mind, and changed its bright visions of extensive usefulness into gloomy and narrow reflections upon self.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

In other studies you go as far as other have gone before you, and there is nothing more to know; but in a scientific pursuit there is continual food for discovery and wonder.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Invention consists in the capacity of seizing on the capabilities of a subject, and in the power of moulding and fashioning ideas suggested to it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The air of fashion, which many young people are so eager to attain, always strikes me like the studied attitudes of some modern prints, copied with tasteless servility after the antigue; the soul is left out, and none of the parts are tied together by what may properly be termed character.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I am not a person of opinions because I feel the counter arguments too strongly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Ah! It is well for the unfortunate to be resigned, but for the guilty there is no peace. The agonies of remorse poison the luxury there is otherwise sometimes found in indulging the excess of grief.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Curiosity, earnest research to learn the hidden laws of nature, gladness akin to rapture, as they unfolded to me, are among the earliest sensations I can remember.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

And now, once again, I bid my hideous progeny go forth and prosper. I have an affection for it, for it was the offspring of happy days, when death and grief were but words, which found no true echo in my heart.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The day of my departure at length arrived. Clerval spent the last evening with us. He had endeavoured to persuade his father to permit him to accompany me and to become my fellow student, but in vain. His father was a narrow-minded trader, and saw idleness and ruin in the aspirations and ambition of his son. Henry deeply felt the misfortune of being debarred from a liberal education. He said little, but when he spoke I read in his kindling eye and in his animated glance a restrained but firm resolve not to be chained to the miserable details of commerce.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

It is true, we shall be monsters, cut off from all the world; but on that account we shall be more attached to one another.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Beware; for I am fearless, and therefore powerful.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Hateful day when I received life!' I exclaimed in agony. 'Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemlance. Satan had his companions, fellow-devils, to admire and encourage him; but I am solitary and abhorred.' - Frankenstein

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I expected this reception. All men hate the wretched; how, then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things! Yet you, my creator, detest and spurn me, thy creature, to whom thou art bound by ties only dissoluble by the annihilation of one of us. You purpose to kill me. How dare you sport thus with life? Do your duty towards me, and I will do mine towards you and the rest of mankind. If you will comply with my conditions, I will leave them and you at peace; but if you refuse, I will glut the maw of death, until it be satiated with the blood of your remaining friends.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Women are told from their infancy, and taught by the example of their mothers, that a little knowledge of human weakness, justly termed cunning, softness of temper, outward obedience and a scrupulous attention to a puerile kind of propriety, will obtain for them the protection of man.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Man," I cried, "how ignorant art thou in thy pride of wisdom!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I saw -- with shut eyes, but acute mental vision -- I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Till society is very differently constituted, parents, I fear, will still insist on being obeyed because they will be obeyed, and constantly endeavor to settle that power on a divine right which will not bear the investigation of reason.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

A human being in perfection ought always to preserve a calm and peaceful mind and never to allow passion or a transitory desire to disturb his tranquility. I do not think that the pursuit of knowledge is an exception to this rule. If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind. If this rule were always observed; if no man allowed any pursuit whatsoever to interfere with the tranquillity of his domestic affections, Greece had not been enslaved, Caesar would have spared his country, America would have been discovered more gradually, and the empires of Mexico and Peru had not been destroyed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Darkness had no effect upon my fancy, and a churchyard was to me merely the receptacle of bodies deprived of life, which, from being the seat of beauty and strength, had become food for the worm.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The careful rearer of the ductile human plant can instil his own religion, and surround the soul by such a moral atmosphere, as shall become to its latest day the air it breathes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

When falsehood can look so like the truth, who can assure themselves of certain happiness?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Even the eternal skies weep, I thought; is there any shame then, that mortal man should spend himself in tears?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I, a miserable wretch, haunted by a curse that shut up every avenue to enjoyment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Our feelings probably are not less strong at fifty than they were ten or fifteen years before; but they have changed their objects, and dwell on far different prospects. At five-and-thirty a man thinks of what his own existence is; when the maturity of age has grown into its autumn, he is wrapt up in that of others. The loss of wife or child then becomes more deplorable, as being impossible to repair; for no fresh connection can give us back the companion of our earlier years, nor a "new-sprung race" compensate for that, whose career we hoped to see run.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change. The sun might shine, or the clouds might lour: but nothing could appear to me as it had done the day before.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

There is something at work in my soul which I do not understand. I am practically industrious - painstaking, a workman to execute with perseverance and labour - but besides this there is a love for the marvellous, a belief in the marvellous, intertwined in all my projects, which hurries me out of the common pathways of men, even to the wild sea and unvisited regions I am about to explore.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

In my joy I thrust my hand into the live embers, but quickly drew it out with a cry of pain. How strange, I thought that the same cause should produce such opposite effects.