Best 144 of Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley quotes - MyQuotes

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Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I leave a sad and bitter world; and if you remember me, and think of me as of one unjustly condemned, I am resigned to the fate awaiting me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

did you not call this a glorious expedition? and wherefore was it glorious? not because the way was smooth and placid as a southern sea, but because it was full of dangers and terror, because at every new incident your fortitude was to be called forth and your courage exhibited, because danger and death surrounded it, and these you were brave to overcome. for this was it a glorious , for this was it an honorable undertaking

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Once a king ... it was impossible, without risk of life, to sink to a private station.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

When I step into the batter's box, the fans, the noise, the cheers, they all disappear. For that moment, the world is just a battle between me and the pitcher. And more than anything, I want to win.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I beheld the wretch-the miserable monster whom I had created.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

It is hardly surprising that women concentrate on the way they look instead of what is in their minds since not much has been put in their minds to begin with.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Our feelings probably are not less strong at fifty than they were ten or fifteen years before; but they have changed their objects, and dwell on far different prospects. At five-and-thirty a man thinks of what his own existence is; when the maturity of age has grown into its autumn, he is wrapt up in that of others. The loss of wife or child then becomes more deplorable, as being impossible to repair; for no fresh connection can give us back the companion of our earlier years, nor a "new-sprung race" compensate for that, whose career we hoped to see run.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Ennui, the demon, waited at the threshold of his noiseless refuge, and drove away the stirring hopes and enlivening expectations, which form the better part of life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Polluted by crimes, and torn by the bitterest remorse, where can I find rest but in death?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Truly disappointment is the guardian deity of human life; she sits at the threshold of unborn time, and marshals the events as they come forth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

You will rejoice to hear that no disaster has accompanied the commencement of an enterprise which you have regarded with such evil forebodings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Allow me now to return to the cottagers, whose story excited in me such various feelings of indignation, delight, and wonder, but which all terminated in additional love and reverence for my protectors (for so I loved, in an innocent, half painful self-deceit, to call them).

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

How dreadful it is, to emerge from the oblivion of slumber, and to receive as a good morrow the mute wailing of one's own hapless heart - to return from the land of deceptive dreams to the heavy knowledge of unchanged disaster!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

A solitary being is by instinct a wanderer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

When I run over the frightful catalogue of my sins, I cannot believe that I am the same creature whose thoughts were once filled with sublime and transcendent visions of the beauty and the majesty of goodness. But it is even so; the fallen angel becomes a malignant devil.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

A lofty sense of independence is, in man, the best privilege of his nature.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Look forward to future years, if not with eager anticipation, yet with a calm reliance upon the power of good, wholly remote from despair.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I saw -- with shut eyes, but acute mental vision -- I saw the pale student of unhallowed arts kneeling beside the thing he had put together. I saw the hideous phantasm of a man stretched out, and then, on the working of some powerful engine, show signs of life, and stir with an uneasy, half-vital motion.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Standing armies can never consist of resolute robust men; they may be well-disciplined machines, but they will seldom contain men under the influence of strong passions, or with very vigorous faculties.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great and sudden change. The sun might shine, or the clouds might lour: but nothing could appear to me as it had done the day before.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I, a miserable wretch, haunted by a curse that shut up every avenue to enjoyment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Our faults are apt to assume giant and exaggerated forms to our eyes in youth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

In my joy I thrust my hand into the live embers, but quickly drew it out with a cry of pain. How strange, I thought that the same cause should produce such opposite effects.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Poetry, and the principle of Self, of which money is the visible incarnation, are the God and the Mammon of the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

A human being in perfection ought always to preserve a calm and peaceful mind and never to allow passion or a transitory desire to disturb his tranquility. I do not think that the pursuit of knowledge is an exception to this rule. If the study to which you apply yourself has a tendency to weaken your affections and to destroy your taste for those simple pleasures in which no alloy can possibly mix, then that study is certainly unlawful, that is to say, not befitting the human mind. If this rule were always observed; if no man allowed any pursuit whatsoever to interfere with the tranquillity of his domestic affections, Greece had not been enslaved, Caesar would have spared his country, America would have been discovered more gradually, and the empires of Mexico and Peru had not been destroyed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

One as deformed and horrible as myself, could not deny herself to me. My companion must be of the same species, and have the same defects... with whom I can live in the interchange of those sympathies necessary for my being.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Solitude becomes a sort of tangible enemy, the more dangerous, because it dwells within the citadel itself.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

It is a strange feeling for a girl when first she finds the power put into her hand of influencing the destiny of another to happiness or misery. She is like a magician holding for the first time a fairy wand, not having yet had experience of its potency.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

All judges had rather that ten innocent should suffer than that one guilty should escape.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

. . . the companions of our childhood always possess a certain power over our minds which hardly any later friend can obtain.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

There is something so different in Venice from any other place in the world, that you leave at once all accustomed habits and everyday sights to enter an enchanted garden.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Elegance is inferior to virtue.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

It was very different when the masters of science sought immortality and power; such views, although futile, were grand: but now the scene was changed. The ambition of the inquirer seemed to limit itself to the annihilation of those visions on which my interest in science was chiefly founded. I was required to exchange chimeras of boundless grandeur for realities of little worth.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein - more, far more, will I achieve; treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

And the violet lay dead while the odour flew On the wings of the wind o'er the waters blue.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I am sorry that I am alive to feel this misery and horror.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

And now, once again, I bid my hideous progeny go forth and prosper. I have an affection for it, for it was the offspring of happy days, when death and grief were but words, which found no true echo in my heart.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

From my infancy I was imbued with high hopes and a lofty ambition.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The choice is with us; let us will it, and our habitation becomes a paradise. For the will of man is omnipotent, blunting the arrows of death, soothing the bed of disease, and wiping away the tears of agony.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I saw and heard of none like me. Was I then a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled, and whom all men disowned?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Supremely frightful would be the effect of any human endeavor to mock the stupendous mechanism of the Creator of the world.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I generally rested during the day and travelled only when I was secured by night from the view of man. One morning, however, finding that my path lay through a deep wood, I ventured to continue my journey after the sun had risen; the day, which was one of the first of spring, cheered even me by the loveliness of its sunshine and the balminess of the air. I felt emotions of gentleness and pleasure, that had long appeared dead, revive within me. Half surprised by the novelty of these sensations, I allowed myself to be borne away by them, and forgetting my solitude and deformity, dared to be happy. Soft tears again bedewed my cheeks, and I even raised my humid eyes with thankfulness towards the blessed sun, which bestowed such joy upon me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Curiosity, earnest research to learn the hidden laws of nature, gladness akin to rapture, as they unfolded to me, are among the earliest sensations I can remember.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Oh! Stars and clouds and winds, ye are all about to mock me; if ye really pity me, crush sensation and memory; let me become as nought; but if not, depart, depart, and leave me in darkness.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

The air of fashion, which many young people are so eager to attain, always strikes me like the studied attitudes of some modern prints, copied with tasteless servility after the antigue; the soul is left out, and none of the parts are tied together by what may properly be termed character.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Women are told from their infancy, and taught by the example of their mothers, that a little knowledge of human weakness, justly termed cunning, softness of temper, outward obedience and a scrupulous attention to a puerile kind of propriety, will obtain for them the protection of man.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Invention, it must be humbly admitted, does not consist in creating out of a void, but out of chaos; the materials must in the first place be afforded; it can give form to dark, shapeless substances, but cannot bring into being the substance itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

I am not a person of opinions because I feel the counter arguments too strongly.