Best 368 of Hiking quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 15 Sep

Seneca The Elder

There's some end at last for the man who follows a path; mere rambling is interminable.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aspen Matis

I slipped quickly through darkness. A thousand unseen frogs were ribbetting and croaking, a symphony of primal night. I felt like an animal; I ran through the Marble Mountains to my home in the dark woods. The rocks were abrasive pumice, rough and hard like sandpaper, perilous, and yet I felt euphoric, much safer navigating them without light than I had in Etna, in the daylight. I was safe in this world. This was a place for creatures—I felt I had become more of a creature than a girl. I could handle myself in the wild.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Crystal Renn

No matter what size you are, you must be healthy. I focus on health as a model, whether it's doing yoga, hiking, kickboxing - those things bring me joy.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Prajakta Mhadnak

Feeling LOW? Go on mountains.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Nikola Horvat

Vrijeme na thru hikeu gotovo da i ne postoji. U današnjem svijetu satova čovjek je izgubio pojam o tome što znači živjeti neograničen vremenom. Vrijeme je suprotnost vječnosti. Vječnost je božanska. Osjetiti vječnost znači osjetiti svemir i njegov spokoj. Tek kroz spokoj čovjek biva izmijenjen.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Aspen Matis

Maybe I'd die. Maybe I'd burn to ash in wind, or blacken like the pines. Charred skeletons, I'd add one to the count. I didn't feel scared. I didn't think to panic. The trail wasn't burning. I was raw, ripe for loving. I wasn't stopping.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jean-jacques Rousseau

For, as I think I have said, I can only meditate when I am walking. When I stop I cease to think; my mind only works with my legs.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Andy Richter

There are naked people in boots on a mountain top firing guns.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Ruskin

Walk while ye have the light, lest darkness come upon you.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ben Montgomery

She introduced people to the A.T., and at the same time she made the thru-hike achievable. It didn’t take fancy equipment, guidebooks, training, or youthfulness. It took putting one foot in front of the other—five million times.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Arthur Baer

A good neighbor is a fellow who smiles at you over the back fence, but doesn't climb over it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aspen Matis

I flushed—this time not in shame—but in rage.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Joe Teti

Hiking up a hill is an ass kicker, going downhill is a little easier.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ben Montgomery

The trail was designed to have no end, a wild place on which to be comfortably lost for as long as one desired. In those early days nobody fathomed walking the thing from beginning to end in one go. Section hikes, yes. Day hikes, too. But losing yourself for five months, measuring your body against the earth, fingering the edge of mental and physical endurance, wasn’t the point. The trail was to be considered in sections, like a cow is divided into cuts of beef. Even if you sample every slice, to eat the entire beast in a single sitting was not the point. Before 1948, it wasn’t even considered possible.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Joseph Monninger

Fishing the small streams of New Hampshire is a pastime that combines hiking, map reading, and bushwhacking - plenty of it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Gaston Rebuffat

Consider what you want to do in relation to what you are capable of doing. Climbing is, above all, a matter of integrity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Paul Stanley

The great thing about rock-n-roll is you realize the top of the mountain is big enough for more than one band.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephanie Tourles

Walking is the number one exercise for your feet as well as your body. Barefoot walking is the ideal.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Josie Ho

Getting outdoors is always fun. In the summertime, I like to go waterskiing and swimming; during the winter, I'll sometimes go jogging or hiking.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Mark Twain

Experience comes from bad judgment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Rosalia De Castro

I see my path, but I don't know where it leads. Not knowing where I'm going is what inspires me to travel it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Patanjali

The longest journey begins with a single step.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Arthur Ward

The experienced mountain climber is not intimidated by a mountain - he is inspired by it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Bill Bryson

The American woods have been unnerving people for 300 years. The inestimably priggish and tiresome Henry David Thoreau thought nature was splendid, splendid indeed, so long as he could stroll to town for cakes and barley wine, but when he experienced real wilderness, on a vist to Katahdin in 1846, he was unnerved to the cored. This wasn't the tame world of overgrown orchards and sun-dappled paths that passed for wilderness in suburban Concord, Massachusetts, but a forbiggind, oppressive, primeval country that was "grim and wild . . .savage and dreary," fit only for "men nearer of kin to the rocks and wild animals than we." The experience left him, in the words of one biographer, "near hysterical.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jean M. Grant

It’s a bridal veil waterfall. Folks come to cliff jump from the shorter waterfall beside it. I prefer a climb alongside to the top of the taller one. There are no trails to the top. I’ll be with you the whole way.” Her hand warmed in his. “I’ll catch you.” “But kiwis don’t fly,” Charlotte said. He laughed lightly with her reference to New Zealand’s iconic flightless bird…and the name they adopted for themselves. There was her sweetness. “You’re well read. Nope, but I have mad skills.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Aspen Matis

You don’t need extra food, extra water, extra clothing for extra warmth – anything extra. You don’t need soap or deodorant. Everything you carry you should need daily.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Cheryl Strayed

I will never go home, I thought with a finality that made me catch my breath, and then I walked on, my mind emptying into nothing but the effort to push my body to the bald monotony of the hike. There wasn't a day on the trail when that monotony didn't ultimately win out, when the only thing to think about was whatever was the physically hardest. It was a sort of scorching cure.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Janine Turner

I love to ride horses, hike in the woods with Juliette and appraise Longhorns.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Tim Cahill

I like rainbows. We came back down to the meadow near the steaming terrace and sat in the river, just where one of the bigger hot streams poured into the cold water of the Ferris Fork. It is illegal – not to say suicidal – to bathe in any of the thermal features of the park. But when those features empty into the river, at what is called a hot pot, swimming and soaking are perfectly acceptable. So we were soaking off our long walk, talking about our favorite waterfalls, and discussing rainbows when it occurred to us that the moon was full. There wasn’t a hint of foul weather. And if you had a clear sky and a waterfall facing in just the right direction… Over the course of a couple of days we hked back down the canyon to the Boundary Creek Trail and followed it to Dunanda Falls, which is only about eight miles from the ranger station at the entrance to the park. Dunanda is a 150-foot-high plunge facing generally south, so that in the afternoons reliable rainbows dance over the rocks at its base. It is the archetype of all western waterfalls. Dunenda is an Indian name; in Shoshone it means “straight down,” which is a pretty good description of the plunge. ... …We had to walk three miles back toward the ranger station and our assigned campsite. We planned to set up our tents, eat, hang our food, and walk back to Dunanda Falls in the dark, using headlamps. We could be there by ten or eleven. At that time the full moon would clear the east ridge of the downriver canyon and would be shining directly on the fall. Walking at night is never a happy proposition, and this particular evening stroll involved five stream crossings, mostly on old logs, and took a lot longer than we’d anticipated. Still, we beat the moon to the fall. Most of us took up residence in one or another of the hot pots. Presently the moon, like a floodlight, rose over the canyon rim. The falling water took on a silver tinge, and the rock wall, which had looked gold under the sun, was now a slick black so the contrast of water and rock was incomparably stark. The pools below the lip of the fall were glowing, as from within, with a pale blue light. And then it started at the base of the fall: just a diagonal line in the spray that ran from the lower east to the upper west side of the wall. “It’s going to happen,” I told Kara, who was sitting beside me in one of the hot pots. Where falling water hit the rock at the base of the fall and exploded upward in vapor, the light was very bright. It concentrated itself in a shining ball. The diagonal line was above and slowly began to bend until, in the fullness of time (ten minutes, maybe), it formed a perfectly symmetrical bow, shining silver blue under the moon. The color was vaguely electrical. Kara said she could see colors in the moonbow, and when I looked very hard, I thought I could make out a faint line of reddish orange above, and some deep violet at the bottom. Both colors were very pale, flickering, like bad florescent light. In any case, it was exhilarating, the experience of a lifetime: an entirely perfect moonbow, silver and iridescent, all shining and spectral there at the base of Dunanda Falls. The hot pot itself was a luxury, and I considered myself a pretty swell fellow, doing all this for the sanity of city dwellers, who need such things more than anyone else. I even thought of naming the moonbow: Cahill’s Luminescence. Something like that. Otherwise, someone else might take credit for it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Carolyn Murphy

I'm not surfing much anymore, but I love hiking and gardening, and I'm always wearing a hat and sunblock.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Petrarch

From thought to thought, from mountain peak to mountain. Love leads me on; for I can never still My trouble on the world's well beaten ways.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Aspen Matis

After all this time questioning whether I could trust myself, my instinct had proven right — I’d found a path in pathless woods.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bill Bryson

Every twenty minutes on the Appalachian Trail, Katz and I walked farther than the average American walks in a week. For 93 percent of all trips outside the home, for whatever distance or whatever purpose, Americans now get in a car. On average, the total walking of an American these days - that's walking of all types: from car to office, from office to car, around the supermarket and shopping malls - adds up to 1.4 miles a week...That's ridiculous.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Muir

Hiking. I don't like either the word or the thing. People ought to saunter in the mountains...the se mountains are our Holy Land, and we ought to saunter through them reverently, not 'hike' through them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Of course it is of no use to direct our steps to the woods, if they do not carry us thither. I am alarmed when it happens that I have walked a mile into the woods bodily, without getting there in spirit.... What business have I in the woods, if I am thinking of something out of the woods?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Calista Flockhart

I like to hike with my dog, Webster. It helps clear my mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Annie Dillard

We are here on the planet only once, and might as well get a feel for the place.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Christine Feehan

I live on the beautiful Northern California coast. I have always loved hiking, whale watching and being outdoors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Aspen Matis

Childhood is a wilderness.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Casar Jacobson

Be the kind of person that sees an obstacle as a Mountain, and throws on their hiking gear

By Anonym 15 Sep

A. R. Ammons

With the first step, the number of shapes the walk might take is infinite, but then the walk begins to define itself as it goes along, though freedom remains total with each step: any tempting side road can be turned into an impulse, or any wild patch of woods can be explored. The pattern of the walk is to come true, is to be recognized, discovered.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anna Torv

I'm a huge camper, and love hiking and mountain biking.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aspen Matis

It was heartbreaking to realize how we can fail the people we most love without even trying.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aspen Matis

I made a conscious effort to name my needs and desires. To carefully listen to and accurately identify what I felt. Hunger, exhaustion, cold, lower-back ache, thirst. The ephemeral pangs: wistfulness and loneliness. Rest fixed most things. Sleep was my sweet reward. I treated bedtime as both incentive and sacrament.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Je Tsongkhapa

Emptiness is the track on which the centered person moves.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Thomas Kinkade

Everyone can identify with a fragrant garden, with beauty of sunset, with the quiet of nature, with a warm and cozy cottage.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Joan Halifax

Mountain’s realization comes through the details of the breath, mountain appears in each step. Mountain then lives inside our bones, inside our heart-drum. It stands like a huge mother in the atmosphere of our minds. Mountain draws ancestors together in the form of clouds. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the raining of the past. Heaven, Earth and human meet in the winds of the future. Mountain mother is a birth gate that joins the above and below, she is a prayer house, she is a mountain. Mountain is a mountain.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Karl Philipp Moritz

I now resolved to go to bed early, with a firm purpose of also rising early the next day to revisit this charming walk; for I thought to myself, I have now seen this temple of the modern world imperfectly; I have seen it only by moonlight.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Edward Abbey

Life is already too short to waste on speed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Nolan Gould

I had so much fun touring the Grand Canyon area with the Sierra Club. I love to get outdoors and enjoy nature. We went kayaking, mountain biking, hiking, and even rode mules. To do all these things in one of the most stunning natural areas in the world just made it more amazing. I don't believe that anyone can see the Grand Canyon area for themselves and not know that we have to do everything we can to protect it for future generations.