Best 61 of Laura Hillenbrand quotes - MyQuotes

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Laura Hillenbrand
By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

His conviction that everything happened for a reason, and would come to good, gave him laughing equanimity even in hard times.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

But with nonfiction, the task is very straightforward: Do the research, tell the story

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

He had no money and no home; he lived entirely on the road of the racing circuit, sleeping in empty stalls, carrying with him only a saddle, his rosary, and his books...The books were the closest thing he had to furniture, and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

... character reigns preeminent in determining potential.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I am disabled, so I can't travel, and I have not been to any development meetings, but Gary and the others affiliated with the film keep me updated on everything.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

People think I must have been turning cartwheels on the night I sealed the movie deal - which was only two days after sealing the book deal - but I was really quite terrified.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

The whole country is divided into two camps," wrote Dave Boone in the San Francisco Chronicle. "People who never saw a horse race in their lives are taking sides. If the issue were deferred another week, there would be a civil war between the War Admiral Americans and the Seabiscuit Americans.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

It's easy to talk to a horse if you understand his language. Horses stay the same from the day they are born until the day they die. They are only changed by the way people treat them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

While it's really hard to do, at the same time, I'm escaping my body, which I really want to do. I'm living someone else's life. I get very intensely into the story, into the interviews and the research. I'm experiencing things along with my subjects. I have a freedom I don't have in my physical life

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I just thought I was empty and now I'm being filled...and I just wanted to keep being filled.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

At that moment, something shifted sweetly inside him. It was forgiveness, beautiful and effortless and complete. For Louie Zamperini, the war was over.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

To pilot a racehorse is to ride a half-ton catapult. It is without question one of the most formidable feats in sport.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I've used a cellphone exactly twice. Things move on. The world changes. And I don't know it

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I am in an altogether new world now. I can think of nothing more wonderful. It is a real touch of all that heaven means.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I am actually in poor health due to chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome, and my ability to work is greatly diminished right now, so I have to get better before I can start another big project

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

My illness is excruciating and difficult to cope with. It takes over your entire life and causes more suffering than I can describe.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Louie found the raft offered an unlikely intellectual refuge. He had never recognized how noisy the civilized world was. Here, drifting in almost total silence, with no scents other than the singed odor of the raft, no flavors on his tongue, nothing moving but the slow porcession of shark fins, every vista empty save water and sky, his time unvaried and unbroken, his mind was freed of an encumbrance that civilization had imposed on it. In his head, he could roam anywhere, and he found that his mind was quick and clear, his imagination unfettered and supple. He could stay with a thought for hours, turning it about.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

For me, being a writer was never a choice. I was born one. All through my childhood I wrote short stories and stuffed them in drawers. I wrote on everything. I didn't do my homework so I could write

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I think authors can get into trouble viewing the subject matter as their turf

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

What God asks of men, said [Billy] Graham, is faith. His invisibility is the truest test of that faith. To know who sees him, God makes himself unseen.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I got sick when I was 19, and I'd been a really healthy 19-year-old, so I don't have a lot to compare it to. Does it feel like the pain after you give birth? I don't know

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

The biggest problem has been exhaustion. I've spent about 6 of the last 14 years completely bedridden.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Finally, I wish to remember the millions of Allied servicemen and prisoners of war who lived the story of the Second World War. Many of these men never came home; many others returned bearing emotional and physical scars that would stay with them for the rest of their lives. I come away from this book with the deepest appreciation for what these men endured, and what they scarified, for the good of humanity. It is to them that this book {Unbroken} is dedicated.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

A fantastically huge, roiling cloud, glowing bluish gray, swaggered over the city. It was more than three miles tall. Below it Hiroshima was boiling.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I think if I had been writing fiction, where the work is entirely dependent on the writer's creativity and the potential directions the narrative might take are infinite, I might have frozen

By Anonym 16 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

In Sugamo, Louie asked his escort what had happened to the Bird. He was told that it was believed that the former sergeant, hunted, exiled and in despair, had stabbed himself to death. The words washed over Louie. In prison camp, Watanabe had forced him to live in incomprehensible degradation and violence. Bereft of his dignity, Louie had come home to a life lost in darkness, and had dashed himself against the memory of the Bird. But on an October night in Los Angeles, Louie had found, in Payton Jordan’s words, “daybreak.” That night, the sense of shame and powerlessness that had driven his hate the Bird had vanished. The Bird was no longer his monster. He was only a man. In Sugamo Prison, as he was told of Watanabe’s fate, all Louie saw was a lost person, a life beyond redemption. He felt something that he had never felt fro his captor before. With a shiver of amazement, he realized that it was compassion. At that moment, something shifted swiftly inside him. It was forgiveness, beautiful and effortless and complete. For Louie Zamperini, the was was over.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

... the little horse had drawn more newspaper coverage in 1938 than Roosevelt, who was second, Hitler (third), Mussolini (fourth), or any other newsmaker. His match with War Admiral was almost certainly the single biggest news story of the year and one of the biggest sports moments of the century.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Fatigue is what we experience, but it is what a match is to an atomic bomb.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

We just sat there and watched the plane pass the island, and it never came back," he said. "I could see it on the radar. It makes you feel terrible. Life was cheap in war.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Dignity is as essential to human life as water, food, and oxygen.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

The paradox of vengefulness is that it makes men dependent upon those who have harmed them, believing that their release from pain will come only when they make their tormentors suffer. In seeking the Bird's death to free himself, Louie had chained himself, once again, to his tyrant. During the war, the Bird had been unwilling to let go of Louie; after the war, Louie was unable to let go of the Bird.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Such beauty, he thought, was too perfect to have come about by mere chance. That day in the center of the Pacific was, to him, a gift crafted deliberately, compassionately, for him and Phil. Joyful and grateful in the midst of slow dying, the two men bathed in that day until sunset brought is, and their time in the doldrums, to an end.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Every day after lunch when I was writing my first book, I'd nibble a square of fine chocolate and meditate on all that had gone into its creation: the sun and rain that spilled on the cocoa plant, the soil that nourished it, the hands that picked the beans, and so on. My taste of chocolate became a lesson on the interconnectedness of things, and the infinite blessings for which I am grateful.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

...maybe it was better to break a man's leg than to break his heart.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Without dignity, identity is erased. In its absence, men are defined not by themselves, but by their captors and the circumstances in which they are forced to live.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I have to detach myself completely from aspirations. I hardly ever listen to music anymore because it arouses all of this yearning in me

By Anonym 15 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Though all three men faced the same hardship, their differing perceptions of it appeared to be shaping their fates. Louie and Phil's hope displaced their fear and inspired them to work toward their survival, and each success renewed their physical and emotional vigor. Mac's resignation seemed to paralyze him and the less he participated in their efforts to survive, the more he slipped. Though he did the least, as the days passed, it was he who faded the most. Louie and Phil's optimism, and Mac's hopelessness, were becoming self-fulfilling.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Honestly, I expected to get a cold reception because of my subject matter. But when editors took a look at the story I had to tell, and saw that this was not a parochial story at all, they really warmed to it

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

And at that point, I think my experience in covering the subject helped me. I think editors felt comfortable with the idea of me telling this story because I had demonstrated that I know this business pretty well

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I have vertigo. Vertigo makes it feel like the floor is pitching up and down. Things seem to be spinning. It's like standing on the deck of a ship in really high seas.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

He grasped for hope in Emerson's vision of natural polarities, in which all things are balanced by their opposites—darkness by light, cold by heat, loss by gain.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

My agent and I put out my proposal one Thursday afternoon in August, 1998. Publishers started bidding immediately, and that process progressed for a few days.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

A lifetime of glory is worth a moment of pain. Louie thought: Let go.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

The weather was clear, the track fast War Admiral broke first and finished last.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

In terms of writing about horses, I fell backwards into that. I was intent on getting a Ph.D., becoming a professor, and writing on history but I got sick 14 years ago when I was 19. Getting sick derailed that plan completely

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

I identified in a very deep way with the individuals I was writing about because the theme that runs through this story is of extraordinary hardship and the will to overcome it.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Wonderful?" wrote J.O. Young in his diary. "To stand cheering, crying, waving your hat and acting like a damn fool in general. No one who has spent all but 16 days of the this war as a Nip prisoner can really know what it means to see 'Old Sammy' buzzing around over camp.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Since signing with Universal, I have been working closely with Gary Ross, the director, producer and screenwriter. We have spent many hours on the phone, and I've been sending him information and items that have been useful to the writing process.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

Louie was furious at the sharks. He had thought that they had an understanding:The men would stay out of the sharks' turf - the water - and the sharks would stay off of theirs - the raft. That the sharks had taken shots at him when he had gone overboard, and when the raft had been mostly submerged after the strafing, had seemed fair enough. But their attempt to poach men from their reinflated raft struck Louie as dirty pool. He stewed all night, scowled hatefully at the sharks all day, and eventually made a decision. if the sharks were going to try to eat him, he was going to try to eat them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Laura Hillenbrand

His books were the closest thing he had to furniture and he lived in them the way other men live in easy chairs.