Best 931 of Plato quotes - MyQuotes

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Plato
By Anonym 19 Sep

Plato

We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light. / Nije problem dijete koje se boji mraka; prava tragedija su odrasli koji se boje svjetla.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Misanthropy ariseth from a man trusting another without having sufficient knowledge of his character, and, thinking him to be truthful, sincere, and honourable, finds a little afterwards that he is wicked, faithless, and then he meets with another of the same character. When a man experiences this often, and more particularly from those whom he considered his most dear and best friends, at last, having frequently made a slip, he hates the whole world, and thinks that there is nothing sound at all in any of them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

He who has followed the path of love's initiation in the proper order will on arriving at the end suddenly perceive a marvelous beauty, the source of all our efforts

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

There is nothing so delightful as the hearing, or the speaking of truth. For this reason, there is no conversation so agreeable as that of the man of integrity, who hears without any intention to betray, and speaks without any intention to deceive.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

... our purpose in founding our state was not to promote the happiness of a single class, but, so far as possible, of the whole community. Our idea was that we were most likely to justice in such a community, and so be able to decide the question we are trying to answer. We are therefore at the moment trying to construct what we think is a happy community by securing the happiness not of a select minority, but of a whole.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

The essence of knowledge is self-knowledge.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

What I say is that 'just' or 'right' means nothing but what is in the interest of the stronger party.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

I know nothing more worthy of a man's ambition than that his son be the best of men.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

Any one who has common sense will remember that the bewilderments of the eyes are of two kinds, and arise from two causes, either from coming out of the light or from going into the light, which is true of the mind's eye, quite as much as of the bodily eye; and he who remembers this when he sees any one whose vision is perplexed and weak, will not be too ready to laugh; he will first ask whether that soul of man has come out of the brighter light, and is unable to see because unaccustomed to the dark, or having turned from darkness to the day is dazzled by excess of light.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

The fear of death is indeed the pretence of wisdom, and not real wisdom, being the appearance of knowing the unknown.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Love is a grave mental illness.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

The beginning is the most important part...for that is the time character is being formed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Mariner, do not ask whose tomb this may be, but go with good fortune: I wish you a kinder sea.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

.. we shall not be properly educated ourselves, nor will the guardians whom we are training, until we can recognise the qualities of discipline, courage, generosity, greatness of mind, and others akin to them, as well as their opposites in all their manifestations.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Love is an intermediate state between possession and deprivation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

If someone separated the art of counting and measuring and weighing from all the other arts, what was left of each (of the others) would be, so to speak, insignificant.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

For good nurture and education implant good constitutions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Poets do not compose their poems with knowledge, but by some inborn talent and by inspiration, like seers and prophets who also say many fine things without any understanding of what they say.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

Because a freeman ought not to be a slave in the acquisition of knowledge of any kind. Bodily exercise, when compulsory, does no harm to the body; but knowledge which is acquired under compulsion obtains no hold on the mind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

People are like dirt. They can either nourish you and help you grow as a person or they can stunt your growth and make you wilt and die.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

May not the wolf, as the proverb says, claim a hearing?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Plato

....harmony that would fittingly imitate the utterances and accents of a brave man who is engaged in warfare or in any enforced business, and who, when he has failed […] confronts fortune with steadfast endurance and repels her strokes

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

Abstinence is the surety of temperance.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

A good education consists in knowing how to sing and dance well.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

He who is gracious to his lover under the impression that he is rich, and is disappointed of his gains because he turns out to be poor, is disgraced all the same: for he has done his best to show that he would give himself up to any one's "uses base" for the sake of money; but this is not honourable.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

To conquer oneself is the best and noblest victory; to be vanquished by one's own nature is the worst and most ignoble defeat.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

No one knows whether death is really the greatest blessing a man can have, but they fear it is the greatest curse, as if they knew well.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

He who can properly define and divide is to be considered a god.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

For as there are misanthropists, or haters of men, there are also misologists, or haters of ideas, and both spring from the same cause, which is ignorance of the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

Interference by the three classes with each other s jobs, and interchange of jobs between them, therefore, does the greatest harm to our state, and we are entirely justified in calling it the worst of evils.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Plato

Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Of all the animals, the boy is the most unmanageable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Mathematics is like draughts in being suitable for the young, not too difficult, amusing, and without peril to the state.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

A delightful form of government, anarchic and motley, assigning a kind of equality indiscriminately to equals and unequals alike!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Plato

The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

Every heart sings a song, incomplete, until another heart whispers back.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Physical excellence does not of itself produce a good mind and character: on the other hand, excellence of mind and character will make the best of the physique it is given.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

A fit of laughter, which has been indulged to excess, almost always produces a violent reaction.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

The physician, to the extent he is a physician, considers only the good of the patient in what he prescribes, and his own not at all

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

Hence it is from the representation of things spoken by means of posture and gesture that the whole of the art of dance has been elaborated.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

According to Diotima, Love is not a god at all, but is rather a spirit that mediates between people and the objects of their desire. Love is neither wise nor beautiful, but is rather the desire for wisdom and beauty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Remember how in that communion only, beholding beauty with the eye of the mind, he will be enabled to bring forth, not images of beauty, but realities (for he has hold not of an image but of a reality), and bringing forth and nourishing true virtue to become the friend of God and be immortal, if mortal man may.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

The true runner comes to the finish and receives the prize and is crowned.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

For though a man should be a complete unbeliever in the being of gods; if he also has a native uprightness of temper, such persons will detest evil in men; their repugnance to wrong disinclines them to commit wrongful acts; they shun the unrighteous and are drawn to the upright.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

Love is the joy of the good, the wonder of the wise, the amazement of the gods; desired by those who have no part in him, and precious to those who have the better part in him.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Plato

From a short-sided view, the whole moving contents of the heavens seemed to them a parcel of stones, earth and other soul-less bodies, though they furnish the sources of the world order.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Plato

Nothing could be more important than that the work of a soldier is well done. No tools will make a man a skilled workmen, or master of defense, or be of any use to him who has not learned how to handle them and has never bestowed any attention on them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Plato

It's like this, I think: the excellence of a good body doesn't make the soul good, but the other way around: the excellence of a good soul makes the body as good as it can be.