Best 529 of Lord Byron quotes - MyQuotes

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Lord Byron
By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Tis pleasing to be school'd in a strange tongue By female lips and eyes--that is, I mean, When both the teacher and the taught are young, As was the case, at least, where I have been; They smile so when one's right; and when one's wrong They smile still more.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

There's not a sea the passenger e'er pukes in, Turns up more dangerous breakers than the Euxine.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

But quiet to quick bosoms is a hell.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

Folly loves the martyrdom of fame.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

O ye! who teach the ingenious youth of nations, Holland, France, England, Germany or Spain, I pray ye flog them upon all occasions, It mends their morals, never mind the pain.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Though sages may pour out their wisdom's treasure, there is no sterner moralist than pleasure.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I cannot help thinking that the menace of Hell makes as many devils as the severe penal codes of inhuman humanity make villains.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Prolonged endurance tames the bold.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

The poetry of speech.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

The sight of blood to crowds begets the thirst of more, As the first wine-cup leads to the long revel.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I speak not of men's creeds—they rest between Man and his Maker.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

But I had not quite fixed whether to make him [Don Juan] end in Hell-or in an unhappy marriage,-not knowing which would be the severest.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

There is no passion, more spectral or fantastical than hate, not even its opposite, love, so peoples air, with phantoms, as this madness of the heart.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall; And when Rome falls--the World.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

It is singular how soon we lose the impression of what ceases to be constantly before us. A year impairs, a luster obliterates. There is little distinct left without an effort of memory, then indeed the lights are rekindled for a moment - but who can be sure that the Imagination is not the torch-bearer?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

On with the dance! let joy be unconfin'd No sleep till morn, when Youth and Pleasure meet To chase the Glowing Hours with Flying feet

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I shall soon be six-and-twenty. Is there anything in the future that can possibly console us for not being always twenty-five?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Your thief looks Exactly like the rest, or rather better; 'Tis only at the bar, and in the dungeon, That wise men know your felon by his features.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Such hath it been--shall be--beneath the sun The many still must labour for the one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

To chase the glowing hours with flying feet.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Send me no more reviews of any kind. I will read no more of evil or good in that line. Walter Scott has not read a review of himself for thirteen years .

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

And angling too, that solitary vice, What Izaak Walton sings or says: The quaint, old, cruel coxcomb, in his gullet Should have a hook, and a small trout to pull it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Yon Sun that sets upon the sea We follow in his flight; Farewell awhile to him and thee, My native land-Good Night!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

And wrinkles, the damned democrats, won't flatter.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

There is a tear for all who die, A mourner o'er the humblest grave.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Lord Byron

They grieved for those who perished with the cutter, and also for the biscuit casks and butter.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

And I would hear yet once before I perish The voice which was my music... Speak to me!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Yet truth will sometimes lend her noblest fires, And decorate the verse herself inspires: This fact, in virtue's name, let Crabbe attest,- Though Nature's sternest painter, yet the best.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

My beautiful, my own My only Venice-this is breath! Thy breeze Thine Adrian sea-breeze, how it fans my face! Thy very winds feel native to my veins, And cool them into calmness!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

So do the dark in soul expire, Or live like scorpion girt by fire; So writhes the mind remorse hath riven, Unfit for earth, undoom'd for heaven, Darkness above, despair beneath, Around it flame, within it death.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

It is useless to tell one not to reason but to believe; you might as well tell a man not to wake but sleep.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Lord Byron

LUCIFER: I pity thee who lovest what must perish. CAIN: And I thee who lov'st nothing

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

What is the worst of woes that wait on age? What stamps the wrinkle deeper on the brow? To view each loved one blotted from life's page, And be alone on earth, as I am now.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Pythagoras, Locke, Socrates - but pages might be filled up, as vainly as before, with the sad usage of all sorts of sages, who in his life-time, each was deemed a bore! The loftiest minds outrun their tardy ages.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

For a man to become a poet (witness Petrarch and Dante), he must be in love, or miserable.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

And yet methinks the older that one grows Inclines us more to laugh than scold, though laughter Leaves us so doubly serious shortly after.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Self praise is no praise at all.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

The law of heaven and earth is life for life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

Tis an old lesson; time approves it true, And those who know it best, deplore it most; When all is won that all desire to woo, The paltry prize is hardly worth the cost.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I have not loved the World, nor the World me; I have not flattered its rank breath, nor bowed To its idolatries a patient knee, Nor coined my cheek to smiles,-nor cried aloud In worship of an echo.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

Fare thee well, and if for ever Still for ever fare thee well.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

The mind can make substance, and people planets of its own with beings brighter than have been, and give a breath to forms which can outlive all flesh.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Near this spot are deposited the remains of one who possessed beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of man, without his vices. This praise, which would be unmeaning flattery if inscribed over human ashes, is but a just tribute to the memory of Botswain, a dog.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I have no consistency, except in politics; and that probably arises from my indifference to the subject altogether.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

As falls the dew on quenchless sands, blood only serves to wash ambition's hands.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

We are all selfish and I no more trust myself than others with a good motive.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lord Byron

I should like to know who has been carried off, except poor dear me - I have been more ravished myself than anybody since the Trojan war.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

What is Death, so it be but glorious? 'Tis a sunset; And mortals may be happy to resemble The Gods but in decay.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lord Byron

Sleep hath its own world, and the wide realm of wild reality.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Byron

What is the end of Fame? 'tis but to fill A certain portion of uncertain paper: Some liken it to climbing up a hill, Whose summit, like all hills, is lost in vapour: For this men write, speak, preach, and heroes kill, And bards burn what they call their "midnight taper," To have, when the original is dust, A name, a wretched picture, and worse bust.