Best 116 of John Lancaster Spalding quotes - MyQuotes

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John Lancaster Spalding
By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Leave each one his touch of folly; it helps to lighten life's burden which, if he could see himself as he is, might be too heavy to carry.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

When guests enter the room their entertainers rise to receive them; and in all meetings men should ascend into their higher selves, imparting to one another only the best they know and love.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

A liberal education is that which aims to develop faculty without ulterior views of profession or other means of gaining a livelihood. It considers man an end in himself and not an instrument whereby something is to be wrought. Its ideal is human perfection.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The ploughman knows how many acres he shall upturn from dawn to sunset: but the thinker knows not what a day may bring forth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

When we have attained success, we see how inferior it is to the hope, yearning and enthusiasm with which we started forth in life's morning.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Whom little things occupy and keep busy, are little men.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Insight makes argument ridiculous.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

In the world of thought a man's rank is determined, not by his average work, but by his highest achievement.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The power of free will is developed and confirmed by increasing the number of worthy motives which influence conduct.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Culture makes the whole world our dwelling place; our palace in which we take our ease and find ourselves at one with all things.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Unless we consent to lack the common things which men call success, we shall hardly become heroes or saints, philosophers or poets.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

He who leaves school, knowing little, but with a longing for knowledge, will go farther than one who quits, knowing many things, but not caring to learn more.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If a state should pass laws forbidding its citizens to become wise and holy, it would be made a byword for all time. But this, in effect, is what our commercial, social, and political systems do. They compel the sacrifice of mental and moral power to money and dissipation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Passion is begotten of passion, and it easily happens, as with the children of great men, that the base is the offspring of the noble.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Dislike of another's opinions and beliefs neither justifies our own nor makes us more certain of them: and to transfer the repugnance to the person himself is a mark of a vulgar mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

There are who mistake the spirit of pugnacity for the spirit of piety, and thus harbor a devil instead of an angel.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

What we love to do we find time to do.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Whoever has freed himself from envy and bitterness may begin to try to see things as they are.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If all were gentle and contented as sheep, all would be as feeble and helpless.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The noblest are they who turning from the things the vulgar crave, seek the source of a blessed life in worlds to which the senses do not lead.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The doctrine of the utter vanity of life is a doctrine of despair, and life is hope.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Those subjects have the greatest educational value, which are richest in incentives to the noblest self-activity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If thy words are wise, they will not seem so to the foolish: if they are deep the shallow will not appreciate them. Think not highly of thyself, then, when thou art praised by many.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

A hobby is the result of a distorted view of things. It is putting a planet in the place of a sun.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If thou need money, get it in an honest way by keeping books, if thou wilt, but not by writing books.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

They who can no longer unlearn have lost the power to learn.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

It is difficult to be sure of our friends, but it is possible to be certain of our loyalty to them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Work, mental or manual, is the means whereby attention is compelled, it is the instrument of all knowledge and virtue, the root whence all excellence springs.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

We may outgrow the things of children, without acquiring sense and relish for those which become a man.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If ancient descent could confer nobility, the lower forms of life would possess it in a greater degree than man.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Folly will run its course and it is the part of wisdom not to take it too seriously.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The aim of education is to strengthen and multiply the powers and activities of the mind rather than to increase its possessions.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

To secure approval one must remain within the bounds of conventional mediocrity. Whatever lies beyond, whether it be greater insight and virtue, or greater stolidity and vice, is condemned. The noblest men, like the worst criminals, have been done to death.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If thy friends tire of thee, remember that it is human to tire of everything.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Faith, like love, unites; opinion, like hate, separates.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

As we can not love what is hateful, let us accustom ourselves neither to think nor to speak of disagreeable things and persons.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

A Wise man knows that much of what he says and does is commonplace and trivial. His thoughts are not all solemn and sacred in his own eyes. He is able to laugh at himself and is not offended when others make him a subject whereon to exercise their wit.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

We are made ridiculous less by our defects than by the affectation of qualities which are not ours.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Friends humor and flatter us, they steal our time, they encourage our love of ease, they make us content with ourselves, they are the foes of our virtue and our glory.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

As memory may be a paradise from which we cannot be driven, it may also be a hell from which we cannot escape.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

If I am not pleased with myself, but should wish to be other than I am, why should I think highly of the influences which have made me what I am?

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

It is the business of the teacher ... to fortify reason and to make conscience sovereign.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

They whom trifles distract and nothing occupies are but children.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Women are aristocrats, and it is always the mother who makes us feel that we belong to the better sort.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

We may avoid much disappointment and bitterness of soul by learning to understand how little necessary to our joy and peace are the things the multitude most desire and seek.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

As a brave man goes into fire or flood or pestilence to save a human life, so a generous mind follows after truth and love, and is not frightened from the pursuit by danger or toil or obloquy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The common man is impelled and controlled by interests; the superior, by ideas.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

The highest strength is acquired not in overcoming the world, but in overcoming one's self. Learn to be cruel to thyself, to withstand thy appetites, to bear thy sufferings, and thou shalt become free and able.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Each forward step we take we leave some phantom of ourselves behind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Lancaster Spalding

Thy money, thy office, thy reputation are nothing; put away these phantom clothings, and stand like an athlete stripped for the battle.