Best 6 325 of Nature quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Julia H Sun

Only by understanding how the world around us works, can we understand our bodies and live well in and with nature and among others.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Thubten Yeshe

At certain times, a silent mind is very important, but 'silent' does not mean closed. The silent mind is an alert, awakened mind; a mind seeking the nature of reality.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Liv Arnesen

I know many people who believe in God, and I expected to find Him on my way to the South Pole if he exists. My religious experiences were very different however, [only] involving myself, nature and the universe.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Shaman Elizabeth Herrera

The world is like a river with sludge lying at the bottom. On sunny days, the water appears to be clear and inviting, but inevitably, a storm comes along, forcing the sludge to the surface, muddying the water. When that happens, you become aware of it and perceive it as bad, but in reality, it is an opportunity to remove it...to heal it. If you don’t, the sludge settles to the bottom where it remains until the next storm comes along

By Anonym 14 Sep

Albert Schweitzer

My life is full of meaning to me. The life around me must be full of significance to itself. If I am to expect others to respect my life, then I must respect the other life I see.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Pattiann Rogers

The Congregating of Stars They often meet in mountain lakes, No matter how remote, no matter how deep Down and far they must stream to arrive, Navigating between the steep, vertical piles Of broken limestone and chert, through shattered Trees and dry bushes bent low by winter, Across ravines cut by roaring avalanches Of boulders and ripping ice. Silently, the stars have assembled On the surface of this lost lake tonight, Arranged themselves to match the patterns They maintain in the highest spheres Of the surrounding sky. And they continue on, passing through The smooth, black countenance of the lake, Through that mirror of themselves, down through The icy waters to touch the perfect bottom Stillness of the invisible life and death existing In the nether of those depths. Sky-bound- yet touching every needle In the torn and sturdy forest, every stone, Sharp, cracked along the ragged shore- the stars Appear the same as in ancient human ages On the currents of the old seas and the darkened Trails of desert dunes, Orion’s belt the same As it shone in Galileo’s eyes, Polaris certain above The sails of every mariner’s voyage. An echoing Light from the Magi’s star, that bacon, might even Be shining on this lake tonight, unrecognized. The stars are congregating, perhaps in celebration, passing through their own names and legends, through fogs, airs, and thunders, the vapors of winter frost and summer pollens. They are ancestors of transfiguration, intimate with all the eyes of the night. What can they know?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Evelyn Beatrice Hall

There is always more goodness in the world than there appears to be, because goodness is of its very nature modest and retiring.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jeffrey R. Anderson

When spring knocks at your door, regardless of the time of year or season of our lives, run, do not walk to that door, throw it open with wild abandon, and say, "Yes! Yes, come in! Do me, and do me big!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Alan W. Watts

We might 'conquer' nature if we could first, or at the same time, conquer our own nature, though we do not see that human nature and 'outside' nature are all of a piece.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Adalbert Stifter

Everything that God sends us is beautiful, even though we may not understand it - and we only need to give it some proper thought to see that what God gives is just sheer happiness; the suffering is what we add to it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anthony D. Williams

The majesty of creation forms my faith in the Creator.

By Anonym 18 Sep

J. A. Baker

The hardest thing of all to see is what is really there. Books about birds show pictures of the peregrine, and the text is full of information. Large and isolated in the gleaming whiteness of the page, the hawk stares back at you, bold, statuesque, brightly coloured. But when you have shut the book, you will never see that bird again. Compared with the close and static image, the reality will seem dull and disappointing. The living bird will never be so large, so shiny-bright. It will be deep in landscape, and always sinking farther back, always at the point of being lost. Pictures are waxworks beside the passionate mobility of the living bird.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lewis Thomas

We have dominated and overruled nature, and from now on the earth is ours, a kitchen garden until we learn to make our own chlorophyll and float it out in the sun inside plastic mebranes. We will build Scarsdale on Mount Everest.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Johann Kaspar Lavater

Where there is much pretension, much has been borrowed; nature never pretends.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Matshona Dhliwayo

The sun is intelligent because it never rises too early, and wise because it never sets too late.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Lailah Gifty Akita

The ripen fruit is for a sacred season.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Christopher Buehlman

He gets away with it because he's strong.' 'This is the story of mankind.' 'I thought you were going to be a priest at one point.' 'Yes. But then I read the newspaper.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henry S. Whitehead

His new friends did not, perhaps, realize the overpowering effect of the sudden change upon this northernbred man; the effects of the moonlight and the soft trade-wind, the life of love which surrounded him here. Love whispered to him vaguely, compellingly. It summoned him from the palm fronds, rustling dryly in the continuous breeze; love was telegraphed through the shy, bovine eyes of the brown girls in his estate-house village; love assailed him in the breath of the honey-like sweet grass, undulating all day and all night under the white moonlight of the Caribbees, pouring over him intoxicatingly through his opened jalousies as he lay, often sleepless, through long nights of spice and balm smells on his mahogany bedstead—pale grass, looking like snow under the moon. The half-formulated yearnings which these sights and sounds were begetting were quite new and fresh in his experience. Here fresh instincts, newly released, stirred, flared up, at the glare of early-afternoon sunlight, at the painful scarlet of the hibiscus blooms, the incredible indigo of the sea—all these flames of vividness through burning days, wilting into a caressing coolness, abruptly, at the fall of the brief, tropic dusk. The fundament of his crystallizing desire was for companionship in the blazing life of this place of rapid growth and early fading, where time slipped away so fast. ("Sweet Grass")

By Anonym 15 Sep

Sylvain Tesson

Aucun penseur n'oserait dire que le parfum des aubépines est inutile aux constellations..." Prolonger la question hugolienne : qui prétendrait que le ressac n'est pour rien dans les rêves du faon, que le vent n'éprouve rien à se heurter au mur, que l'aube est insensible aux trilles des mésanges ?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dada Bhagwan

Charging [creation of new karma] is under ‘your’ control and discharge [disposal of karma] is in nature’s control. Therefore, if you want to charge, charge positively. Whatever you have charged, nature will not refrain from discharging.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Aristotle

For nature by the same cause, provided it remain in the same condition, always produces the same effect, so that either coming-to-be or passing-away will always result.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robin Wall Kimmerer

Philosophers call this state of isolation and disconnection “species loneliness”—a deep, unnamed sadness stemming from estrangement from the rest of Creation, from the loss of relationship. As our human dominance of the world has grown, we have become more isolated, more lonely when we can no longer call out to our neighbors. It’s no wonder that naming was the first job the Creator gave Nanabozho.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ashutosh Gupta

A thinker builds his castle of thoughts inside a garden of roses and it loses its relevance among the roses. He builds it along the shore and it’s trampled by the fury of waves eventually. He builds it on a cliff high enough and it becomes impregnable but out of reach. Such is the fate of that castle

By Anonym 15 Sep

Albert Einstein

We experience ourselves our thoughts and feelings as something separate from the rest. A kind of optical delusion of consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Humphry Davy

The whole language of nature informs us, that in animated beings there is something above our powers of investigation; something which employs, combines, and arranges the gross elements of matter - a spark of celestial fire, by which life is kindled and preserved, and which, if even the instruments it employs are indestructible in their essence, must itself, of necessity, be immortal.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Voltaire

We are all full of weakness and errors; let us mutually pardon each other our follies - it is the first law of nature.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Georg C. Lichtenberg

Here take back the stuff that I am, nature, knead it back into the dough of being, make of me a bush, a cloud, whatever you will, even a man, only no longer make me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen Jay Gould

The true beauty of nature is her amplitude; she exists neither for nor because of us, and possesses a staying power that all our nuclear arsenals cannot threaten (much as we can easily destroy our puny selves).

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jack Kerouac

And all the insects ceased in honor of the moon.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susan Sontag

Guns have metamorphosed into cameras in this earnest comedy, the ecology safari, because nature has ceased to be what it always had been - what people needed protection from. Now nature tamed, endangered, mortal - needs to be protected from people.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Herschel

To the natural philosopher, there is no natural object unimportant or trifling. From the least of Nature's works he may learn the greatest lessons.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louise Wilder

A garden full of sweet odours is a garden full of charm, a most precious kind of charm not to be implanted by mere skill in horticulture or power of purse, and which is beyond explaining. It is born of sensitive and very personal preferences yet its appeal is almost universal.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Harry Hill

It's only when you look at an ant through a magnifying glass on a sunny day that you realize how often they burst into flames.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ken Lauter

This World "We hear that other lands are better: we do not know. The pines sing and we are glad. Our children play in the sand and we hear them sing and we are glad. The seeds ripen an we have them to eat and we are glad. We do not want their good lands; we want our rocks and the great mountains where our fathers lived." A Shi’vwits chief to JW Powell Sun on red rock Raves riding thermals Jays crazy in the pines Big blue mountain On the far horizon And here- infinite air- Moving, opening East-west, north-south, Up-down, high Over the one-way river Pulling The whole sky west. What need For any other world?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fran Lebowitz

If you are of the opinion that the contemplation of suicide is sufficient evidence of a poetic nature, do not forget that actions speak louder than words.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Fennel Hudson

Find a part of yourself hidden in the twilight.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Mudford

Come ye viewless ministers of this dread hour! Come from the fenny lake, the hanging rock, and the midnight cave! The moon is red – the stars are out – the sky is burning – and all nature stands aghast at what we do!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Wilkie Collins

At any time, and under any circumstances of human interest, is it not strange to see how little real hold the objects of the natural world amid which we live can gain on our hearts and minds? We go to Nature for comfort in trouble, and sympathy in joy, only in books. Admiration of those beauties of the inanimate world, which modern poetry so largely and so eloquently describes, is not, even in the best of us, one of the original instincts of our nature.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Wordsworth

Sweet is the lore which Nature brings; Our meddling intellect Mis-shapes the beauteous forms of things We murder to dissect. Enough of Science and of Art; Close up these barren leaves; Come forth, and bring with you a heart That watches and receives.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Aldo Leopold

Having to squeeze the last drop of utility out of the land has the same desperate finality as having to chop up the furniture to keep warm.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Baudelaire

Nature... is nothing but the inner voice of self-interest.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Patience Johnson

No satan can unsettle what God has settled.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert Louis Stevenson

Sing a song of seasons; something bright in all, flowers in the summer, fires in the fall.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Matshona Dhliwayo

Spring is proof that there is beauty in new beginnings.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Patience Johnson

Long before something happens in our life, it happened in our heart.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Thomas Fuller

He that plants trees loves others besides himself.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karen Blixen

The Kikuyu, when left to themselves, do not bury their dead, but leave them above ground for the hyenas and vultures to deal with. The custom had always appealed to me, I thought that it would be pleasant thing to be laid out to the sun and the stars, and to be so promptly, neatly, and openly picked and cleansed; to be made one with Nature and become a common component of a landscape.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Hume

To consider the matter aright, reason is nothing but a wonderful and unintelligible instinct in our souls, which carries us along a certain train of ideas, and endows them with particular qualities, according to their particular situations and relations. This instinct, 'tis true, arises from past observation and experience; but can anyone give the ultimate reason, why past experience and observation produces such an effect, any more than why nature alone should produce it?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Harlan Coben

I blinked and the images were gone. But I remembered how the laugh and the howl and the splash would ripple and echo in the stillness of our lake, and I wondered if ripples and echoes like those ever fully die away, if somewhere in the woods my father's joyful yelps still bounced quietly off the trees. Silly thought, but there you go.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Butler

Man, unlike the animals, has never learned that the sole purpose of life is to enjoy it.