Best 39 of Jury quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 14 Sep

Colin Mochrie

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury. It's not like the sheep was underage.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Hamilton

The civil jury is a valuable safeguard to liberty.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Roscoe Pound

Jury lawlessness is the greatest corrective of law in its actual administration.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Larry Wilmore

The Oscar nominations are out, and they're so white a grand jury has decided not to indict them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Aristotle

When Pleasure is at the bar the jury is not impartial.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Katherine Mcintyre

The jury’s still out on your level of intellect. After all, you signed up with Evil Incorporated in the first place.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Clarence Darrow

Never forget, almost every case has been won or lost when the jury is sworn.

By Anonym 14 Sep

George Bernard Shaw

Only Lawyers and mental defectives are automatically exempt for jury duty.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Steven Magee

Mr Judge, Jury & Executioner of Micah Xavier Johnson‬ needs to go to jail as soon as possible – he is a danger to civilized society.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Johnny Kelly

Usually when attorneys are assembling a jury, they're just looking for sheep that are easily impressed.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Donella Meadows

A grand jury hears only one side - that of the prosecutor

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kenneth Eade

Even though the Judge would charge the jury that they should listen to all the evidence before they made up their minds, the chances were likely that 100% of them will have already decided if William was guilty or not before the trial was over.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kenesaw Mountain Landis

If a jury of your peers finds you not guilty, I will reinstate you back into baseball.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Sharon Cooper

So the fact that the grand jury would come back and make the decision not to indict the jailers and not make a decision on Officer Encinia, it makes us feel as though there's not going to be a positive outcome for us in that regard.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chuck Robb

Normally a grand jury will indict a ham sandwich if a prosecutor asks it to.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert Breault

The verdict is still out on my life, the judge having not yet instructed the jury, both of whom are me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Harper Lee

But in the absence of eye-witness there's always a doubt, sometimes only the shadow of a doubt. The law says 'reasonable doubt', but I think a defendant's entitled to the shadow of doubt. There's always the possibility, no matter how improbable, that he's innocent.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Mokokoma Mokhonoana

When in court, the primary role of lawyers is not to prove or disprove innocence; unbeknown to almost all lawyers and their clients, it is to save the court time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jeremy Sumpter

One lawyer told me that he never drinks water or eats in front of the jury because they can't do either one.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Heru Ofori-atta

Having vision is much more than just being visual.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Felix Wantang

Rejecting Jesus Christ is like a fugitive who spends all day running but has nowhere to hide; you will face him after death. He is the only judge and jury.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Landay

A jury verdict is just a guess - a well-intentioned guess, generally, but you simply cannot tell fact from fiction by taking a vote.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Kenneth Eade

You never know with juries. I’d take a judge every time, unless of course I was guilty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David O. Russell

I got put on jury duty, which is where I learned how to write.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Susan Glaspell

No, Peters, it's all perfectly clear except a reason for doing it. But you know juries when it comes to women.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Robert Black

Women are like a living, breathing casino Like a judge and jury They sense everything They sense what you try to hide They sense your weaknesses They sense your power levels One must be patient One must listen Watch And wait Before one strikes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Reginald Rose

Look, this boy's been kicked around all his life. You know-living in a slum, his mother dead since he was nine. He spent a year and a half in an orphanage while his father served a jail term for forgery. That's not a very good head start. He's had a pretty terrible sixteen years. I think maybe we owe him a few words. That's all.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kenneth Eade

Emotions are reserved for juries and, in that case, a good lawyer can really lay them on when the time is right, better than the best Academy Award winning actor

By Anonym 18 Sep

John Grisham

Since most law-abiding citizens had no contact with the parole system, it was not a priority with the state legislatures. And since most of the state's prisoners were either poor or black, and unable to use the system to their advantage, it was easy to hit them with harsh sentences and keep them locked up. But for an inmate with a few connections and some cash, the parole system was a marvelous labyrinth of contradictory laws that allowed the Parole Board to pass out favors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Howard Zinn

A jury is always a more orthodox body than any defendant brought before it; for blacks it is usually a whiter group, for poor people, a more prosperous group... Another lesson about the justice system: the way the judge charges the jury inevitably pushes them one way or the other, limits their independent judgment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Sol Wachtler

A grand jury would 'indict a ham sandwich,' if that's what you wanted.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Dana Gould

Life is like jury duty. Just do it and get it over with.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Margaret Mead

Warfare ... is just an invention, older and more widespread than the jury system, but none the less an invention.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ross Cheit

The book argues that even though many cases have been held up as classic examples of modern American “witch hunts,” none of them fits that description. McMartin certainly comes close. But a careful examination of the evidence presented at trial demonstrates why, in my view, a reasonable juror could vote for conviction, as many did in this case. Other cases that have been painted as witch-hunts turn out to involve significant, even overwhelming, evidence of guilt. There are a few cases to the contrary, but even those are more complicated than the witch-hunt narrative allows. In short, there was not, by any reasonable measure, an epidemic of “witch hunts” in the 1980s. There were big mistakes made in how some cases were handled, particularly in the earliest years. But even in those years there were cases such as those of Frank Fuster and Kelly Michaels that, I believe, were based on substantial evidence but later unfairly maligned as having no evidentiary support.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Stephen Jay Gould

Orchids were not made by an ideal engineer; they are jury-rigged from a limited set of available components.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert Graves

I happened to notice that among the men who had willingly presented themselves for jury-service was one whom I knew to be the father of seven children. Under a law of Augustus's he was exempt for the rest of his life; yet he had not pleaded for exemption or mentioned the size of his family. I told the magistrate: "Strike this man's name off. He's a father of seven." He protested: "But, Cæsar, he has made no attempt to excuse himself." "Exactly," I said, "he wants to be a juryman. Strike him off." I meant, of course,that the fellow was concealing his immunity from what every honest man considered a very thankless and disagreeable duty and that he therefore was almost certain to have crooked intentions. Crooked jurymen could pick up a lot of money by bribes, for it was a commonplace that one interested juryman could sway the opinions of a whole bunch of uninterested ones; and the majority verdict decided a case.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Christopher Hitchens

I vote and I do jury duty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susan B. Anthony

I have many things to say. My every right, constitutional, civil, political and judicial has been tramped upon. I have not only had no jury of my peers, but I have had no jury at all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Noam Chomsky

A woman was the property of her father or her husband and that remained true right into the twentieth century. It wasn't until 1975 that women had a guaranteed right to serve on federal juries.