Best 23 of Ernest Bramah quotes - MyQuotes

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Ernest Bramah
By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

However deep you dig a well it affords no refuge in the time of flood.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

The wise duck keeps his mouth shut when he smells frogs.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

A reputation for a thousand years may depend upon the conduct of a single moment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

He who thinks he is raising a mound may only in Reality be digging a pit.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Better a dish of husks to the accompaniment of a muted lute than to be satiated with stewed shark's fin and rich spiced wine of which the cost is frequently mentioned by the provider.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Although there exist many thousand subjects for elegant conversation, there are persons who cannot meet a cripple without talking about feet.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

When Ling was communicating to any person the signs by which messengers might find him, he was compelled to add, "the neighbourhood in which this contemptible person resides is that officially known as 'the mean quarter favoured by the lower class of those who murder by treachery'," and for this reason he was not always treated with the regard to which his attainments entitled him, or which he would have unquestionably received had he been able to describe himself as of "the partly-drained and uninfected area reserved to Mandarins and their friends.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

When struck by a thunderbolt it is unnecessary to consult the Book of Dates as to the precise meaning of the omen.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Before hastening to secure a possible reward of five taels by dragging an unobservant person away from a falling building, examine well his features lest you find, when too late, that it is one to whom you are indebted for double that amount.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

There are few situations in life that cannot be resolved promptly, and to the satisfaction of all concerned, by either suicide, a bag of gold, or thrusting a despised antagonist over a precipice on a dark night

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ernest Bramah

It is a mark of insincerity of purpose to spend one's time in looking for the sacred Emperor in the low-class tea-shops.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ernest Bramah

One may ride upon a tiger's back but it is fatal to dismount.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ernest Bramah

The inimitable stories of Tong-King never have any real ending, and this one, being in his most elevated style, has even less end than most of them. But the whole narrative is permeated with the odour of joss-sticks and honourable high-mindedness, and the two characters are both of noble birth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

The province of philosophy is not so much to prevent calamities befalling as to demonstrate that they are blessings when they have taken place.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

How is it possible to suspend topaz in one cup of the balance and weigh it against amethyst in the other; or who in a single language can compare the tranquillizing grace of a maiden with the invigorating pleasure of witnessing a well-contested rat-fight?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ernest Bramah

One learns to itch where one can scratch.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

At the mention of the name and offence of this degraded being a great sound went up from the entire multitude - a universal cry of execration, not greatly dissimilar from that which may be frequently heard in the crowded Temple of Impartiality when the one whose duty it is to take up, at a venture, the folded papers, announces that the sublime Emperor, or some mandarin of exalted rank, has been so fortunate as to hold the winning number in the Annual State Lottery.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

There are those who collect the refuse of the public streets, but in order to be received into the band it is necessary to have been born one of the Hereditary Confederacy of Superfluity Removers and Abandoned Oddment Gatherers.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Bramah

When an alluring woman comes in at the door," warningly traced the austere Kien-fi on the margin of his well-known essay, "discretion may be found up the chimney". It is incredible that beneath this ever-timely reminder an obscure disciple should have added the words: "The wiser the sage, the more profound the folly.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Should a person on returning from the city discover his house to be in flames, let him examine well the change which he has received from the chair-carrier before it is too late; for evil never travels alone.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Alas! It is well written, The road to eminence lies through the cheap and exceedingly uninviting eating-houses.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

He who has failed three times sets up as an instructor.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ernest Bramah

Eat in the dark the bargain that you purchased in the dusk.