Best 76 of Fanny Burney quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Fanny Burney
By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I'd rather be done any thing to than laughed at, for, to my mind, it's one or other the disagreeablest thing in the world.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

We continually say things to support an opinion, which we have given, that in reality we don't above half mean.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

Look at your [English] ladies of quality are they not forever parting with their husbands - forfeiting their reputations - and is their life aught but dissipation? In common genteel life, indeed, you may now and then meet with very fine girls - who have politeness, sense and conversation - but these are few - and then look at your trademen's daughters - what are they? poor creatures indeed! all pertness, imitation and folly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

... there's nothing but quarreling with the women; it's my belief they like it better than victuals and drink.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I never pretend to be so superior a being as to be above having and indulging a hobby horse [her journal writing], and while I keep mine within due bounds and limits, nobody, I flatter myself, would wish to deprive me of the poor animal: to be sure, he is not formed for labour, and is rather lame and weak, but then the dear creature is faithful, constant, and loving, and though he sometimes prances, would not kick anyone into the mire, or hurt a single soul for the world--and I would not part with him for one who could win the greatest prize that ever was won at any races.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

Insensibility, of all kinds, and on all occasions, most moves my imperial displeasure

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

while we all desire to live long, we have all a horror of being old!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

the right line of conduct is the same for both sexes, though the manner in which it is pursued, may somewhat vary, and be accommodated to the strength or weakness of the different travelers.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Fanny Burney

Young, animated, entirely off your guard, and thoughtless of consequences, Imagination took the reins; and Reason, slow-paced, though sure-footed, was unequal to the race of so eccentric and flighty a companion. How rapid was then my Evelina's progress through those regions of fancy and passion whither her new guide conducted her!-She saw Lord Orville at a ball,-and he was the most amiable of men! -She met him again at another,-and he had every virtue under Heaven!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Fanny Burney

There was an exceeding good concert, but too much talking to hear it well. Indeed I am quite astonished to find how little music is attended to in silence; for, though every body seems to admire, hardly any body listens.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

In England, I was quite struck to see how forward the girls are made--a child of 10 years old, will chat and keep you company, while her parents are busy or out etc.--with the ease of a woman of 26. But then, how does this education go on?--Not at all: it absolutely stops short.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

an old woman ... is a person who has no sense of decency; if once she takes to living, the devil himself can't get rid of her.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

To save the mind from preying inwardly upon itself, it must be encouraged to some outward pursuit. There is no other way to elude apathy, or escape discontent; none other to guard the temper from that quarrel with itself, which ultimately ends in quarreling with all mankind.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

Far from having taken any positive step, I have not yet even fommed any resolution.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Tired, ashamed, and mortified, I begged to sit down till we returned home, which I did soon after. Lord Orville did me the honour to hand me to the coach, talking all the way of the honour I had done him ! O these fashionable people!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I love and honour [Paulus Aemilius, in Plutarch's Lives], for his fondness for his children, which instead of blushing at, he avows and glories in: and that at an age, when almost all the heros and great men thought that to make their children and family a secondary concern, was the first proof of their superiority and greatness of soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

Nothing is so delicate as the reputation of a woman; it is at once the most beautiful and most brittle of all human things.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

... it's vastly more irksome to give up one's own way, than to hear a few impertinent remarks.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

Imagination took the reins, and reason, slow-paced, though sure-footed, was unequal to a race with so eccentric and flighty a companion.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

But alas, my dear child, we are the slaves of custom, the dupes of prejudice, and dare not stem the torrent of the opposing world, even though our judgments condemn our compliance! However, since the die is cast, we must endeavor to make the best of it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I looked about for some of my acquaintance, but in vain, for I saw not one person that I knew, which is very odd, for all the world seemed there.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

the mind naturally accommodates itself, even to the most ridiculous improprieties, if they occur frequently.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

There is something in age that ever, even in its own despite, must be venerable, must create respect and to have it ill treated, is to me worse, more cruel and wicked than anything on earth

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

A youthful mind is seldom totally free from ambition; to curb that, is the first step to contentment, since to diminish expectation is to increase enjoyment.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

The Spring is generally fertile in new acquaintances.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

to diminish expectation is to increase enjoyment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I cannot sleep - great joy is as restless as sorrow.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

But if the young are never tired of erring in conduct, neither are the older in erring of judgment.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

To Nobody, then, will I write my Journal! since to Nobody can I be wholly unreserved, to Nobody can I reveal every thought, every wish of my heart, with the most unlimited confidence, the most unremitting sincerity, to the end of my life!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Wealth per se I never too much valued, and my acquaintance with its possessors has by no means increased my veneration for it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

People who live together naturally catch the looks and air of one another and without having one feature alike, they contract a something in the whole countenance which strikes one as a resemblance

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

To whom, then, must I dedicate my wonderful, surprising and interesting adventures? to whom dare I reveal my private opinion of my nearest relations? the secret thoughts of my dearest friends? my own hopes, fears, reflections and dislikes? Nobody!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Well of all things in the world, I don't suppose anything can be so dreadful as a public wedding--my stars!--I should never be able to support it!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Unused to the situations in which I find myself, and embarassed by the slightest difficulties, I seldom discover, till too late, how I ought to act.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

falsehood is not more unjustifiable than unsafe.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

don't be angry with the gentleman for thinking, whatever be the cause, for I assure you he makes no common practice of offending in that way.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

A little alarm now and then keeps life from stagnation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

How truly does this journal contain my real and undisguised thoughts--I always write it according to the humour I am in, and if astranger was to think it worth reading, how capricious--insolent & whimsical I must appear!--one moment flighty and half mad,--the next sad and melancholy. No matter! Its truth and simplicity are its sole recommendations.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I have this very moment finished reading a novel called The Vicar of Wakefield [by Oliver Goldsmith].... It appears to me, to be impossible any person could read this book through with a dry eye and yet, I don't much like it.... There is but very little story, the plot is thin, the incidents very rare, the sentiments uncommon, the vicar is contented, humble, pious, virtuous--but upon the whole the book has not at all satisfied my expectations.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

O! how short a time does it take to put an end to a woman's liberty!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

such is the effect of true politeness, that it banishes all restraint and embarassment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

Can any thing, my good Sir, be more painful to a friendly mind than a necessity of communicating disagreeable intelligence? Indeed, it is sometimes difficult to determine, whether the relater or the receiver of evil tidings is most to be pitied.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Those who wander in the world avowedly and purposely in pursuit of happiness, who view every scene of present joy with an eye to what may succeed, certainly are more liable to disappointment, misfortune and unhappiness, than those who give up their fate to chance and take the goods and evils of fortune as they come, without making happiness their study, or misery their foresight.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I cannot be much pleased without an appearance of truth; at least of possibility I wish the history to be natural though the sentiments are refined; and the characters to be probable, though their behaviour is excelling

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

To save the mind from preying inwardly upon itself, it must be encouraged to some outward pursuit.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

You have sensible women here [in England] but then, they are very devils--censorious, uncharitable, sarcastic--the women in Scotland have twice--thrice their freedom, with all their virtue--and are very conversable and agreeable--their educations are more finished.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

I am tired to death! tired of every thing! I would give the universe for a disposition less difficult to please. Yet, after all, what is there to give pleasure? When one has seen one thing, one has seen every thing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fanny Burney

She [Evelina] is not, indeed, like most modern young ladies; to be known in half an hour; her modest worth, and fearful excellence, require both time and encouragement to show themselves.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fanny Burney

Travelling is the ruin of all happiness. There's no looking at a building here after seeing Italy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fanny Burney

But how cool, how quiet is true courage!