Best 30 of Hermann Von Helmholtz quotes - MyQuotes

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Hermann Von Helmholtz
By Anonym 16 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

[Hegel’s] system of nature seemed, at least to natural philosophers, absolutely crazy….Hegel…launched out with particular vehemence and acrimony against the natural philosophers, and especially against Isaac Newton. The philosophers accused the scientific men of narrowness; the scientific men retorted that the philosophers were insane.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

I then endeavoured to show that it is more especially in the thorough conformity with law which natural phenomena and natural products exhibit, and in the comparative ease with which laws can be stated, that this difference exists.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Each individual fact, taken by itself, can indeed arouse our curiosity or our astonishment, or be useful to us in its practical applications.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Music strikes the ear as a perfectly undisturbed uniform sound which remains unaltered as long as it exists.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

During the first half of the present century we had an Alexander von Humboldt, who was able to scan the scientific knowledge of his time in its details, and to bring it within one vast generalization. At the present juncture, it is obviously very doubtful whether this task could be accomplished in a similar way, even by a mind with gifts so peculiarly suited for the purpose as Humboldt's was, and if all his time and work were devoted to the purpose.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

A moving body whose motion was not retarded by any resisting force would continue to move to all eternity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

As you are aware, no perceptions obtained by the senses are merely sensations impressed on our nervous systems. A peculiar intellectual activity is required to pass from a nervous sensation to the conception of an external object, which the sensation has aroused. The sensations of our nerves of sense are mere symbols indicating certain external objects, and it is usually only after considerable practice that we acquire the power of drawing correct conclusions from our sensations respecting the corresponding objects.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

What we see is the solution to a computational problem, our brains compute the most likely causes from the photon absorptions within our eyes.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

The formation of scales and of the web of harmony is a product of artistic invention, and is in no way given by the natural structure or by the natural behaviour of our hearing, as used to be generally maintained hitherto.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

The quantity of force which can be brought into action in the whole of Nature is unchangeable, and can neither be increased nor diminished.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Just as a physicist has to examine the telescope and galvanometer with which he is working; has to get a clear conception of what he can attain with them, and how they may deceive him; so, too, it seemed to me necessary to investigate likewise the capabilities of our power of thought.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

A raised weight can produce work, but in doing so it must necessarily sink from its height, and, when it has fallen as deep as it can fall, its gravity remains as before, but it can no longer do work.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Isolated facts and experiments have in themselves no value, however great their number may be. They only become valuable in a theoretical or practical point of view when they make us acquainted with the law of a series of uniformly recurring phenomena, or, it may be, only give a negative result showing an incompleteness in our knowledge of such a law, till then held to be perfect.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

All that science can achieve is a perfect knowledge and a perfect understanding of the action of natural and moral forces.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Whoever, in the pursuit of science, seeks after immediate practical utility, may generally rest assured that he will seek in vain.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

The total quantity of all the forces capable of work in the whole universe remains eternal and unchanged throughout all their changes. All change in nature amounts to this, that force can change its form and locality, without its quantity being changed. The universe possesses, once for all, a store of force which is not altered by any change of phenomena, can neither be increased nor diminished, and which maintains any change which takes place on it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Not that I wish by any means to deny, that the mental life of individuals and peoples is also in conformity with law, as is the object of philosophical, philological, historical, moral, and social sciences to establish.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Reason we call that faculty innate in us of discovering laws and applying them with thought.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

A metaphysical conclusion is either a false conclusion or a concealed experimental conclusion.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Heat can also be produced by the impact of imperfectly elastic bodies as well as by friction. This is the case, for instance, when we produce fire by striking flint against steel, or when an iron bar is worked for some time by powerful blows of the hammer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Windmills, which are used in the great plains of Holland and North Germany to supply the want of falling water, afford another instance of the action of velocity. The sails are driven by air in motion - by wind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

There is a kind, I might almost say, of artistic satisfaction, when we are able to survey the enormous wealth of Nature as a regularly ordered whole a kosmos, an image of the logical thought of our own mind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

I think the facts leave no doubt that the very mightiest among the chemical forces are of electric origin. The atoms cling to their electric charges, and opposite electric charges cling to each other.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

The smallest quantity of alcohol scares away novel ideas.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

I have been able to solve a few problems of mathematical physics on which the greatest mathematicians since Euler have struggled in vain ... But the pride I might have held in my conclusions was perceptibly lessened by the fact that I knew that the solution of these problems had almost always come to me as the gradual generalization of favorable examples, by a series of fortunate conjectures, after many errors. I am fain to compare myself with a wanderer on the mountains who, not knowing the path, climbs slowly and painfully upwards and often has to retrace his steps because he can go no further—then, whether by taking thought or from luck, discovers a new track that leads him on a little till at length when he reaches the summit he finds to his shame that there is a royal road by which he might have ascended, had he only the wits to find the right approach to it. In my works, I naturally said nothing about my mistake to the reader, but only described the made track by which he may now reach the same heights without difficulty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Black is real sensation, even if it is produced by entire absence of light. The sensation of black is distinctly different from the lack of all sensations.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

The most startling result of Faraday's Law is perhaps this. If we accept the hypothesis that the elementary substances are composed of atoms, we cannot avoid concluding that electricity also, positive as well as negative, is divided into definite elementary portions, which behave like atoms of electricity.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

In speaking of the work of machines and of natural forces we must, of course, in this comparison eliminate anything in which activity of intelligence comes into play. The latter is also capable of the hard and intense work of thinking, which tries a man just as muscular exertion does.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

Music stands in a much closer connection with pure sensation than any of the other arts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hermann Von Helmholtz

When young Galileo, then a student at Pisa, noticed one day during divine service a chandelier swinging backwards and forwards, and convinced himself, by counting his pulse, that the duration of the oscillations was independent of the arc through which it moved, who could know that this discovery would eventually put it in our power, by means of the pendulum, to attain an accuracy in the measurement of time till then deemed impossible, and would enable the storm-tossed seaman in the most distant oceans to determine in what degree of longitude he was sailing?