Best 123 of Kate Atkinson quotes - MyQuotes

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Kate Atkinson
By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

It's been said that the men in my books have been absent, or weak, or creepy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

She was a terrible mother, there was no doubt about it, but she didn't even have the strength to feel guilty.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kate Atkinson

She was tremendously fond of Ralph. Not hounded by love the way some women were. With Crighton she had been teased endlessly by the idea of it, but with Ralph it was more straightforward. Again not love, more like the feelings you would have for a favorite dog (and, no, she would never have said such a thing to him. Some people, a lot of people, didn't understand how attached one could be to a dog.)

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

It was the kind of summer evening that made Ursula want to be alone. 'Oh,' Izzie said, 'You're at an age when a girl is simply consumed by the sublime.' Ursula wasn't sure what she meant ('No one is ever sure what she means,' Sylvie said) but she thought she understood a little. There was a strangeness in the shimmering air, a sense of imminence that made Ursula's chest feel full, as if her heart was growing. It was a kind of high holiness - she could think of no other way of describing it. Perhaps it was the future, she thought, coming nearer all the time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I think about death a lot, I really do, because I can't believe I won't exist. It's the ego isn't it? I feel that I should retreat into a better form of Zen Buddhism than this kind of ego-dominated thing. But I don't know, I mean, I want to come back as a tree but I suspect that it's just not going to happen, is it?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kate Atkinson

She had married him in order to be safe from the chaos. He had married her, she now understood, for the same reason. They were the last two people on earth who could make anyone safe from anything.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Ursula craved solitude but she hated loneliness, a conundrum that she couldn’t even begin to solve.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Maths was "the one true thing," according to Nancy. "Not love?" Teddy said. "Oh, love, of course," Nancy said, in an offhanded way. "Love is crucial, but it's an abstract and numbers are absolute. Numbers can't be manipulated." An unsatisfactory answer, surely, Teddy thought. It seemed to him that love should be the absolute, trumping everything. Did it? For him?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Across the world millions of lives are altered by the absence of the dead, but three members of Teddy's last crew—Clifford the bomb-aimer, Fraser, the injured pilot, and Charlie, the tail-end Charlie—all bail out successfully from F-Fox and see out the rest of the war in a POW camp. On their return they all marry and have children, fractals of the future.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

And when all else is gone, Art remains.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

How many times would he disappoint you in a day if you were married to him, Ursula wondered?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

He had been very keen on Esperanto, which had seemed an absurd eccentricity at the time but now Ursula thought it might be a good thing to have a universal language, as Latin had once been. Oh, yes, Miss Woolf said, a common language was a wonderful idea, but utterly utopian. All good ideas were, she said sadly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

The past is a cupboard full of light and all you have to do is find the key that opens the door.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

...and no man gave you a fur coat without expecting to receive something inreturn. Except for one's husband, of course, who expected nothing beyond modest gratitude.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

And who thought it was a good idea to rent bicycles to Italian adolescent language students? If hell did exist, which Jackson was sure it did, it would be governed by a committee of fifteen-year-old Italian boys on bikes.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

In the end, it is my belief, words are the only things that can construct a world that makes sense.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I can't help but think that it's an unfortunate custom to name children after people who come to sticky ends. Even if they are fictional characters, it doesn't bode well for the poor things. There are too many Judes and Tesses and Clarissas and Cordelias around. If we must name our children after literary figures then we should search out happy ones, although it's true they are much harder to find.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Teddy shuddered. The idea of the sublime little bird being plucked from the sky, of its exquisite song being interrupted in full flight, was horrible to him.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Sometimes it was harder to change the past than it was the future.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I have been to the world's end and back and now I know what I would put in my bottom drawer .I would put my sisters.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kate Atkinson

What does it matter what people do? At the end of the day we're all dead.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Why do cats sleep so much? Perhaps they've been trusted with some major cosmic task, an essential law of physics - such as: if there are less than five million cats sleeping at any one time the world will stop spinning.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Murder and suicide aren't genetic,' Julia said, scoffing sandwiches in the Black Swan in Helmsley after their visit to Rievaulx Terraces. 'Nathan isn't predisposed to tragedy.' Jackson wasn't so sure about that but he kept that thought to himself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

What if we had a chance to do it again and again, until we finally did get it right? Wouldn't that be wonderful?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

If Bertie was a god (a favourite fantasy), she would be manufacturing things there was a shortage of - bees, tigers, dormice - not flip-flops and phone covers and toothpaste.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I am mad, I think. I am mad therefore I think. I am mad therefore I think I am.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Was there a poet who hadn't written about skylarks?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Hindsight’s a wonderful thing,” Klara said. “If we all had it there would be no history to write about.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Time was a thief, he stole your life away from you and the only way you could get it back was to outwit him and snatch it right back.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Love was the hardest thing. Don't let anyone ever tell you different.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I don't have goals when writing books, apart from getting to the end. I have rather vague ideas about how I want things to feel, I'm big on ambience. I have a title, a beginning and a probable ending and go from there.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

...and no man gave you a fur coat without expecting to receive something in return. Except for one's husband, of course, who expected nothing beyond modest gratitude.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Not his real home, his real home, the one he never named any more, was the dark and sooty chamber in his heart that contained his sister and his brother and, because it was an accommodating kind of space, the entire filthy history of the industrial revolution.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

It wasn't that [he] believed in religion, or a God, or an afterlife. He just knew it was impossible to feel this much love and for it to end.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I mean what else is there for a woman to do if she doesn't want to go from the parental to the marital home with nothing in between? 'An educated woman,'Millie amended. 'An educated woman,' Ursula agreed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Did he know what love was? The love for a father, a sister, for a dog even, yes, but between a husband and wife? Two lives knitted inextricably together. Or yoked and harnessed. ("That's the point," Sylvie said, "otherwise we would all run wild.")

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

As I watch, the sky fills with clouds of snow feathers from every kind of bird there ever was and even some that only exist in the imagination, like the bluebirds that fly over the rainbow.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Get down,' Bunty says grimly. 'Mummy's thinking.' (Although what Mummy's actually doing is wondering what it would be like if her entire family was wiped out and she could start again.)

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I spent four years doing a doctorate in postmodern American literature. I can recognize it when I see it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

My father was an autodidact. It wasn't a middle-class house. Shopkeepers are aspirant. He paid for me to go to private school. He was denied an education - he had a horrible childhood. He got a place at a grammar school and wasn't allowed to go.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Maybe this was why people filled their house with stinking cats, so they didn't notice that they were alone, so they wouldn't die without a living soul noticing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Why is everything an 'adventure' with you?" Sylvie said irritably to Izzie." "Because life is an adventure, of course." "I would say it was more of an endurance race," Sylvie said. "Or an obstacle course.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Atkinson

They said love made you strong, but in Louise's opinion it made you weak. It corkscrewed into your heart and you couldn't get it out again, not without ripping your heart to pieces.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

He was born a politician. No, Ursula thought, he was born a baby, like everyone else. And this is what he has chosen to become.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kate Atkinson

This Henry lived in Edinburgh, making him inaccessible and giving her something to do on the weekends — 'Oh, just flying up to Scotland, Henry's taking me fishing,' which is the kind of thing she imagined people doing in Scotland — she always thought of the Queen Mother, incongruous in mackintosh and waders, standing in the middle of a shallow brown river (somewhere on the outskirts of Brigadoon, no doubt) and casting a line for trout.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Certainly I had a really terrible time with 'Emotionally Weird.' When I finished it, I thought, 'I can't write any more.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Julia's vocabulary was "chock-full" of strangely archaic words - "spiffing," "crumbs," "jeepers" - that seemed to have originated in some prewar girls' annual rather than in Julia's own life. For Jackson, words were functional, they helped you get to places and explain things. For Julia, they were freighted with inexplicable emotion.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kate Atkinson

I had a novel in the back of my mind when I won an Ian St James story competition in 1993. At the award ceremony an agent asked me if I was writing a novel. I showed her four or five chapters of what would become 'Behind the Scenes at the Museum' and to my surprise she auctioned them off.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kate Atkinson

It's funny, isn't it," Miss Woolf whispered in Ursula's ear, "how much German music we listen to. Great beauty transcends all. Perhaps after the war it will heal all too.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Atkinson

Most people muddled through events and only in retrospect realized their significance.