Best 173 of Bram Stoker quotes - MyQuotes

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Bram Stoker
By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

It is something like the way dame Nature gathers round a foreign body an envelope of some insensitive tissue which can protect from evil that which it would otherwise harm by contact. If this be an ordered selfishness, then we should pause before we condemn any one for the vice of egoism, for there may be deeper root for its causes than we have knowledge of.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I heard once of an American who so defined faith: 'that faculty which enables us to believe things which we know to be untrue.' For one, I follow that man. He meant that we shall have an open mind, and not let a little bit of truth check the rush of the big truth, like a small rock does a railway truck. We get the small truth first. Good! We keep him, and we value him, but all the same we must not let him think himself all the truth in the universe.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I felt that it was getting very late indeed, but I did not say anything, for I felt under obligation to meet my host's wishes in ever way.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

The inscrutable laws of sex have so arranged that even a timid woman is not afraid of a fierce and haughty man.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

Listen to them, the children of the night. What music they make!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

Because if a woman's heart was free a man might have hope.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

The fame of an actor is won in minutes and seconds, not in years.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

There was one great tomb more lordly than all the rest; huge it was, and nobly proportioned. On it was but one word, DRACULA.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

And you, their best beloved one, are now to me, flesh of my flesh; blood of my blood; kin of my kin; my bountiful wine-press for awhile; and shall later on be my companion and my helper.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

For now, feeling as though my own brain were unhinged or as if the shock had come which must end in its undoing, I turn to my diary for repose. The habit of entering accurately must help sooth me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

I could not resist the temptation of mystifying him a bit, I suppose it is some taste of the original apple that remains still in our mouths.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

It is wonderful what tricks our dreams play us, and how conveniently we can imagine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

Paris is a city of centralisation--and centralisation and classification are closely allied. In the early times, when centralisation is becoming a fact, its forerunner is classification. All things which are similar or analogous become grouped together, and from the grouping of groups rises one whole or central point. We see radiating many long arms with innumerable tentaculae, and in the centre rises a gigantic head with a comprehensive brain and keen eyes to look on every side and ears sensitive to hear--and a voracious mouth to swallow.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Bram Stoker

Though we were in shelter, we could hear the rising wind, for it moaned and whistled through the rocks, and the branches of the trees crashed together as we swept along. It grew colder and colder still, and fine, powdery snow began to fall, so that soon we and all around us were covered with a white blanket

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

Ah, we men and women are like ropes drawn tight with strain that pull us in different directions.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

Gerçek Tanrı tek bir serçenin düşüşüyle bile ilgilenir ama insan kibrinin yarattığı Tanrı, bir kartal ile serçe arasında hiçbir fark görmez.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

The only beautiful thing in the world whose beauty lasts for ever is a pure, fair soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

Nature in one of her beneficent moods has ordained that even death has some antidote to its own terrors.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

There are such beings as vampires, some of us have evidence that they exist. Even had we not the proof of our own unhappy experience, the teachings and the records of the past give proof enough for sane peoples.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I counsel you, put down in record even your doubts and surmises. Hereafter it may be of interest to you to see how true you guess. We learn from failure, not from success.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I have read of a gentleman who owned a so fine house in London, and when he went for months of summer to Switzerland and lock up his house, some burglar came and broke window at back and got in. Then he went and made open the shutters in front and walk out and in through the door, before the very eyes of the police. Then he have an auction in that house, and advertise it, and put up big notice; and when the day come he sell off by a great auctioneer all the goods of that other man who own them. Then he go to a builder, and he sell him that house, making an agreement that he pull it down and take all away within a certain time. And your police and other authority help him all they can. And when that owner come back from his holiday in Switzerland he find only an empty hole where his house had been. This was all done en règle; and in our work we shall be en règle too. We shall not go so early that the policemen who have then little to think of, shall deem it strange; but we shall go after ten o’clock, when there are many about, and such things would be done were we indeed owners of the house.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

God will act in His own way and time. Do not fear, and do not rejoice as yet; for what we wish for at the moment may be our undoings." - Van Helsing, Dracula

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

I am Dracula, and I bid you welcome . . .

By Anonym 20 Sep

Bram Stoker

You are clever man, friend John; you reason well, and your wit is bold; but you are too prejudiced. You do not let your eyes see nor your ears hear, and that which is outside your daily life is not of account to you. Do you not think that there are things which you cannot understand, and yet which are; that some people see things that others cannot? But there are things old and new which must not be contemplate by men’s eyes, because they know – or think they know – some things which other men have told them. Ah, it is the fault of our science that it wants to explain all; and if it explain not, then it says there is nothing to explain. But yet we see around us every day the growth of new beliefs, which think themselves new; and which are yet but the old, which pretend to be young – like the fine ladies at the opera.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

She was young and very beautiful, but pale, like the grey pallor of death.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

He means to succeed, and a man who has centuries before him can afford to wait and to go slow.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Bram Stoker

Mes, moterys, turime motinišką instinktą, kuris pabudęs iškelia mus virš smulkmeniškumo. Jaučiau ant savo peties šio didelio vyro galvą tarsi vaiko, kurį kada nors glausiu prie savo krūtines.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

Do not think that I am not sad, though I laugh.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

Come,' he said, 'come, we must see and act. Devils or no devils, or all the devils at once, it matters not; we fight him all the same.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

But we are pledged to set the world free. Our toil must be in silence, and our efforts all in secret. For in this enlightened age, when men believe not even what they see, the doubting of wise men would be his greatest strength. It would be at once his sheath and his armor, and his weapons to destroy us, his enemies, who are willing to peril even our own souls for the safety of one we love. For the good of mankind, and for the honor and glory of God.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Bram Stoker

She is one of God's women, fashioned by His own hand to show us men and other women that there is a heaven where we can enter, and that its light can be here on earth. So true, so sweet, so noble, so little an egoist- and that, let me tell you, is much in this age, so skeptical and selfish.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

But a stranger in a strange land, he is no one. Men know him not, and to know not is to care not for.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

No man knows till he has suffered from the night how sweet and dear to his heart and eye the morning can be.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

Good women tell all their lives, and by day and by hour and by minute, such things that angels can read.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Bram Stoker

What a fine fellow is Quincey! I believe in my heart of hearts that he suffered as much about Lucy’s death as any of us, but he bore himself through it like a moral Viking. If America can go on breeding men like that, she will be a power in the world indeed.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Bram Stoker

Oh that I could give any idea of the scene; of that sweet, sweet, good, good woman in all the radiant beauty of her youth and animation, with the red scar on her forehead of which she was conscious, and which we saw with grinding of our teeth- remembering whence and how it came; her loving kindness against our grim hate; her tender faith against all our fears and doubting; and we, knowing that so far as symbols went, she with all her goodness and purity and faith, was outcast from God.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

It is nineteenth century up-to-date with a vengeance. And yet, unless my senses deceive me, the old centuries had, and have, powers of their own which mere 'modernity' cannot kill.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

Being proposed to all is very nice and all that sort of thing, but it isn’t at all a happy thing when you have to see a poor fellow, whom you know loves you honestly, going away and looking all broken-hearted, and to know that, no matter what he may say at the moment, you are passing quite out if his life

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

All men are mad in some way or the other, and inasmuch as you deal discreetly with your madmen, so deal with God's madmen too, the rest of the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

I am all in a sea of wonders. I doubt; I fear; I think strange things, which I dare not confess to my own soul. God keep me, if only for the sake of those dear to me!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I am glad you found your way in here, for I am sure there is much that will interest you. These companions," and he laid his hand on some of the books, "have been good friends to me and for some years past, ever since I had the good idea of going to London, have given me many, many hours of pleasure.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

Suddenly, I became conscious of the fact that the driver was in the act of pulling up the horses in the courtyard of a vast ruined castle, from whose tall black windows came no ray of light, and whose broken battlements showed a jagged line against the sky.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

En la vida hay tinieblas, mi niña, pero también hay luces. Y tu eres la luz de toda luz.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bram Stoker

Ordinary men, to whom all things are possible, don't often, if ever, think of Heaven. It is a name, and nothing more, and they are content to wait and let things be, but to those who are doomed to be shut out for ever you cannot think what it means, you cannot guess or measure the terrible endless longing to see the gates opened, and to be able to join the white figures within.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bram Stoker

Do not fear to think even the most not-probable.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

Before I left the castle I so fixed its entrances that never more can the Count enter there Undead.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Bram Stoker

And then away for home! Away to the quickest and nearest train! Away from this cursed land, where the devil and his children stil walk with earthly feet!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

I suppose it is that sickness and weakness are selfish things and turn our inner eyes and sympathy on ourselves, whilst health and strength give love rein, and in thought and feeling he can wander where he wills.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Bram Stoker

The effect on Lucy was not bad, for the faint seemed to merge subtly into the narcotic sleep. It was with a feeling of personal pride that I could see a faint tinge of colour steal back into the pallid cheeks and lips. No man knows, till he experiences it, what it is to feel his own lifeblood drawn away into the veins of the woman he loves. The Professor watched me critically. "That will do," he said. "Already?" I remonstrated. "You took a great deal more from Art." To which he smiled a sad sort of smile as he replied, "He is her lover, her fiance. You have work, much work to do for her and for others, and the present will suffice.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bram Stoker

He tratado de mantener una mente abierta; y no son las cosas ordinarias de la vida las que pueden cerrarla, sino las cosas extrañas; las cosas extraordinarias, las cosas que lo hacen dudar a uno si son locura o realidad. - Doctor van Helsing.