Best 100 of Geography quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 14 Sep

Neil Gaiman

The biggest difference between England and America is that England has history, while America has geography.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Megan Jean Sovern

I can't believe you all had so much fun being young. I just want to be old. I want to be old and rich and smell like butterscotch." You would have thought I'd said something super awful. Like that I hated Led Zeppelin. Or worse, that I was a Republican. Dad unfolded his feet, let down his legs, and pulled my face to his. "Can't you see how you have the whole world in front of you, Maggie?" First of all, that's not even possible because just as much of the world is in front of me as is behind me because that's just how geography.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kurt Vonnegut

George W. Bush has gathered around him upper-crust C-students who know no history or geography.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Graham Hancock

The suspicion that certain ancient authorities possessed good knowledge of the real shape of the Atlantic and its islands, and of the lands on both sides of it, must also arise from any objective reading of Plato's world-famous account of Atlantis. [...], this story is set around 11,600 years ago -- a date that coincides with a peak episode of global flooding at the end of the Ice Age. The story tells us that 'the island of Atlantis was swallowed up by the sea and vanished', that this took place in 'a single dreadful day and night' and that the event was accompanied by earthquakes and floods that were experienced as far away as the eastern Mediterranean. But of more immediate interest to us here is what Plato has to say about the geographical situation in the Atlantic immediately before the flood that destroyed Atlantis: 'In those days the Atlantic was navigable. There was an island opposite the strait [the Strait of Gibraltar] which you [the Greeks] call the Pillars of Heracles, an island larger than Libya and Asia combined; from it travellers could in those days reach the other islands, and from them the whole opposite continent which surrounds what can truly be called the ocean. For the sea within the strait we are talking about [i.e. the Mediterranean] is like a lake with a narrow entrance; the outer ocean is the real ocean and the land which entirely surrounds it is properly termed continent ... On this land of Atlantis had arisen a powerful and remarkable dynasty of kings who ruled the whole island; and many other islands as well, and parts of the continent ...' Whether or not one believes than an island called Atlantis ever existed in the Atlantic Ocean, Plato's clear references to an 'opposite continent' on the far side of it are geographical knowledge out of place in time. It is hard to read in these references anything other than an allusion to the Americas, and yet historians assure us that the Americas were unknown in Plato's time and remained 'undiscovered' (except for a few inconsequential Viking voyages) until Colombus in 1492.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Harriet Beecher Stowe

What poor, mean trash this whole business of human virtue is! A mere matter, for the most part, of latitude and longitude, and geographical position, acting with natural temperament. The greater part is nothing but an accident.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ambrose Bierce

A guerra é a forma de Deus en­si­nar ge­o­grafia aos ame­ri­ca­nos.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Linda Leaming

Bhutan does seem a bit unreal at times. Hardly anybody in the U.S. knows where it is. I have friends who still think the entire country is a figment of my imagination. When I was getting ready to move there, and I told people I was going to work in Bhutan, they'd inevitably ask, "Where's Butane?" It is near Africa," I'd answer, to throw them off the trail. "It's where all the disposable lighters come from." They'd nod in understanding.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Lloyd Wedes

Topography defines place and the human situation therein.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lauren Klarfeld

As any distance we take from things give us an outside perspective, so does taking a geographical distance—offering us a new vantage point over our lives.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jennifer K. Mcarthur

The aim of the research is to determine what groups can be drawn up as a result of regular association of place-names. A further step is to consider whether such groups have a geographical significance. This was accepted by Palmer as a reasonable hypothesis; Wilson argued the case for it by considering possible ways in which information to be recorded on the tablets was received by the scribes. Underlying this work is the assumption that groupings may have a geographical basis, but it has still to be shown that this is a reasonable assumption.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aysha Taryam

Geography should be the ultimate deciding factor for every political dilemma for proximity to an ailing land is bound to result in one’s infection.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Randy Newman

I like science - geography, meteorology, cosmology.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Stanislaw Jerzy Lec

If one is seeking for Heaven on earth, has slept in geography class.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alan Moore

Material existence is entirely founded on a phantom realm of mind, whose nature and geography are unexplored.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mokokoma Mokhonoana

He who is ready to die for his country is a fool. For he didn’t choose where he was born; and where he was born didn’t choose him.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Tahir Shah

The ancient paused for a moment, as if his strength were failing. Yet I sensed that there was more to tell. Looking deep into my eyes, he whispered: 'The Gond kingdoms have fallen, their people live dispersed in poverty: the teak trees and the jungles have been cleared... but the importance of the Gonds must not be forgotten!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Graham Hancock

In 1512, in handwritten notes on an enigmatic map that he had prepared showing the newly discovered Americas, the Turkish Admiral Piri Reis offered an intriguing answer to all these questions -- at any rate for the particular case of Christopher Colombus, the most recent and most renowned of the ancient Atlantic dreamers. Piri's note, one of many on the same map, is written over the interior of Brazil: 'Apparently a Genoese infidel, by the name of Columbus was the one who discovered these parts. This is how it happened: a book came into the hands of this Colombus from which he found out that the Western Sea [i.e. the Atlantic] has an end, in other words that there is a coast and islands on its western side with many kinds of ores and gems. Having read this book through, he recounted all these things to the Genoese elders and said, 'Come, give me two ships, and I shall go and find these places.' They said, 'Foolish man, is there an end to the Western Sea? It is filled with the mists of darkness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ken Jennings

The decline of geography in academia is easy to understand: we live in an age of ever-increasing specialization, and geography is a generalist's discipline. Imagine the poor geographer trying to explain to someone at a campus cocktail party (or even to an unsympathetic adminitrator) exactly what it is he or she studies. "Geography is Greek for 'writing about the earth.' We study the Earth." "Right, like geologists." "Well, yes, but we're interested in the whole world, not just the rocky bits. Geographers also study oceans, lakes, the water cycle..." "So, it's like oceanography or hydrology." "And the atmosphere." "Meteorology, climatology..." "It's broader than just physical geography. We're also interested in how humans relate to their planet." "How is that different from ecology or environmental science?" "Well, it encompasses them. Aspects of them. But we also study the social and economic and cultural and geopolitical sides of--" "Sociology, economics, cultural studies, poli sci." "Some geographers specialize in different world regions." "Ah, right, we have Asian and African and Latin American studies programs here. But I didn't know they were part of the geography department." "They're not." (Long pause.) "So, uh, what is it that do study then?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Paul Keating

No choice we can make as a nation lies between our history and our geography. We can hardly change either of them. They are immutable. The only choice we can make as a nation is the choice about our future.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Saroyan

A man's ethnic identity has more to do with a personal awareness than with geography.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Will Advise

All Authors come from the unified countrynent known as Australia. Authors live in the future where love is external.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Eric Weiner

Nothing kills creativity faster than a wall.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Brian Andreas

I like geography best, he said, because your mountains & rivers know the secret. Pay no attention to boundaries.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert Frost

What makes a nation in the beginning is a good piece of geography.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Edmund Burke

Geography is an earthly subject, but a heavenly science.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Pat Conroy

My wound is geography. It is also my anchorage, my port of call.

By Anonym 15 Sep

George Santayana

To me, it seems a dreadful indignity to have a soul controlled by geography.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kathleen Norris

More than ever, I've come to see conspiracy theories as the refuge of those who have lost their natural curiosity to cope with change.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Michael Scott

Making sure that the geography and timelines work is always the hardest part of writing. But you owe it to the readers to get it right!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Linda Hogan

There is a geography of the human spirit, common to all peoples.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Truman Capote

[L]ove, having no geography, knows no boundaries.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sylvain Neuvel

North Korean troops gathering… inside North Korea. That is unheard of." "They were massing very close to the border." "North Korea is the size of Ohio. It would be geographically challenging for them to gather very far from the border.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Nathalia Crane

Oh I'm in love with the janitor's boy, And the janitor's boy loves me; He's going to hunt for a desert isle In our geography.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wendell Berry

An art that heals and protects its subject is a geography of scars.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Rebecca Solnit

That thing we call a place is the intersection of many changing forces passing through, whirling around, mixing, dissolving, and exploding in a fixed location. To write about a place is to acknowledge that phenomena often treated separately—ecology, democracy, culture, storytelling, urban design, individual life histories and collective endeavors—coexist. They coexist geographically, spatially, in place, and to understand a place is to engage with braided narratives and sue generous explorations.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Danah Boyd

Teens’ use of social media is significantly shaped by race and class, geography and cultural background [boyd, danah , "An Old Fogey’s Analysis of a Teenager’s View on Social Media," Medium, January 12, 2015].

By Anonym 19 Sep

Graham Hancock

To have followed the speculative vision of Behaim in his famous globe, or of others like him, would have been disastrous, even though their work represents the cream of fifteenth-century mapmaking and was known to Columbus. Indeed, as one commentator has observed, if his chart had been based on the Behaim scenario, 'Columbus could not even have known of the whereabouts of the New World, much less discover it.' Yet not only does he seem to have known where he was going but, on some accounts, when he was going to get there: 'Now and then Pinzón and Columbus consult and deliberate -- mutually discuss their route. The map or chart passes not infrequently from the one captain to the other; the observations and calculations as to their position are daily recorded, their conduct and course for the night duly agreed upon. On the eve of their due arrival Columbus issues the order to stay the course of the armada, to shorten sail, because he knew that he was close to the New World and was afraid of going ashore during the obscurity of the night ... How does he know the place and the hour? 'His Genius' says the Columbus legend in explanation. But the Map? The critics will ask, what did it contain? Whose was it? What did that map contain that was so frequently passed from Columbus to Pinzón during the voyage?' I've presented my case that what the map may have contained was an accurate but ancient, and indeed antediluvian, representation of the coast and islands of Central America, notably the north-south-oriented Great Bahama Bank island, which Columbus -- no less ignorant than any of his contemporaries about the existence of the Americas -- took to be an accurate map of part of the coast of China and the islands of Japan.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert Adam

If as individuals we can improve the geography only slightly, if at all, perhaps the more appropriately scaled subject for reshaping is ourselves.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Graham Hancock

It is Professor Fuson's view that Chinese charts of Taiwan and Japan were the source of the 1424 portrayal of Antilia and Satanaze. He makes a very persuasive case that such charts are likely to have originated from the seven spectacular voyages of discovery made by the famous Ming admiral Cheng Ho between 1405 and 1433. [...] Much suggests, however, that Robert Fuson is correct to deduce that the charts of Taiwan and Japan that somehow found their way into the hands of Zuane Pizzagano in Venice in 1424 must have originated from the voyages of Cheng Ho. Yet there is a problem. [...] Antilia and Satanaze on the 1424 chart don't show Taiwan and Japan as they looked in the time of Cheng Ho, but rather as they looked approximately 12,500 years ago during the meltdown of the Ice Age. Is it possible that Cheng Ho, too, like Columbus, was guided in his voyages by ancient maps and charts, come down from another time and populated by the ghosts of a drowned world?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Pearl S. Buck

In our changing world nothing changes more than geography.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alastair Bonnett

A place is a storied landscape, somewhere that has human meaning. But another thing we have started to learn, or relearn, is that places aren’t just about people; that they reflect our attempt to grasp and make sense of the non-human; the land and its many inhabitants that are forever around and beyond us. It can be an unnerving exchange, especially when what we hope to see is something purely natural, and what we find instead is our own reflection. Shorelines are waxing and waning with increasing speed, and old kingdoms, like Doggerland, as well as new ones in the once-inaccessible Arctic, are being revealed, demanding that we look at the landscape, and at the map, in new ways; as something in motion, unmoored by tradition.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ronald Peret

Geography is the multidisciplinary summary of life

By Anonym 13 Sep

Eve Ensler

Geography does not define you - love does.

By Anonym 19 Sep

James Rennell

To lovers of adventure and novelty, Africa displays a most ample field.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Fuad Alakbarov

If you can name five Kardashians but can't name five countries in Africa, it's time to turn off the TV and pick up a book.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles H. Hapgood

[I]n most cases the errors on the Piri Re'is Map are due to mistakes in the compilation of the world map, presumably in Alexandrian times, since it appears, as we shall see, that Piri Re'is could not have put them together at all. The component maps, coming from a far greater antiquity, were far more accurate. The Piri Re'is Map appears, therefore, to be evidence of a decline of science from remote antiquity to classical times.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Roderick Murchison

Physical geography and geology are inseparable scientific twins.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Michael Palin

Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future

By Anonym 17 Sep

Guy Davenport

Man was first a hunter, and an artist: his early vestiges tell us that alone. But he must always have dreamed, and recognized and guessed and supposed, all the skills of the imagination. Language itself is a continuously imaginative act. Rational discourse outside our familiar territory of Greek logic sounds to our ears like the wildest imagination. The Dogon, a people of West Africa, will tell you that a white fox named Ogo frequently weaves himself a hat of string bean hulls, puts it on his impudent head, and dances in the okra to insult and infuriate God Almighty, and that there's nothing we can do about it except abide him in faith and patience. This is not folklore, or quaint custom, but as serious a matter to the Dogon as a filling station to us Americans. The imagination; that is, the way we shape and use the world, indeed the way we see the world, has geographical boundaries like islands, continents, and countries. These boundaries can be crossed. That Dogon fox and his impudent dance came to live with us, but in a different body, and to serve a different mode of the imagination. We call him Brer Rabbit.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Rebecca Mcnutt

The hardest part of being a Canadian kid is having to color in Nunavut with a crayon in school, hell on earth.