Best 116 of Hamlet quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

POLONIUS My lord, the queen would speak with you, and presently. HAMLET Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel? POLONIUS By th'mass, and 'tis like a camel indeed. HAMLET Methinks it is like a weasel. POLONIUS It is backed like a weasel. HAMLET Or like a whale? POLONIUS Very like a whale. HAMLET Then I will come to my mother by and by. - They fool me to the top of my bent. - I will come by and by.

By Anonym 20 Sep

John Russell

When art is made new, we are made new with it. We have a sense of solidarity with our own time, and of psychic energies shared and redoubled, which is just about the most satisfying thing that life has to offer. 'If that is possible,' we say to ourselves, 'then everything is possible'; a new phase in the history of human awareness has been opened up, just as it opened up when people first read Dante, or first heard Bach's 48 preludes and fugues, or first learned from Hamlet and King Lear(/I> that the complexities and contradictions of human nature could be spelled out on the stage. This being so, it is a great exasperation to come face to face with new art and not make anything of it. Stared down by something that we don't like, don't understand and can't believe in, we feel personally affronted, as if our identity as reasonably alert and responsive human beings had been called into question. We ought to be having a good time, and we aren't. More than that, an important part of life is being withheld from us; for if any one thing is certain in this world it is that art is there to help us live, and for no other reason.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

More grief to hide than hate to utter love. Polonius, Hamlet.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Gayle Forman

To be, or not to be: that is the question. That’s from Hamlet’s - maybe Shakespeare’s - most famous soliloquy. […] But what if Shakespeare - and Hamlet - were asking the wrong question? What if the real question is not whether to be, but how to be?

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

Te ruego que recites el pasaje tal como te lo he declamado yo,con soltura y naturalidad,pues si lo haces a voz en grito,como acostumbran muchos de nuestros actores,valdría más que diera mis versos a que los voceara el pregonero . Guardate también de aserrar demasiado el aire,así con la mano. Moderación en todo,pues hasta en medio del mismo torrente,tempestad y aún podría decir to torbellino de tu pasión,debes tener y mostrar aquella templanza que hace suave y elegante la expresión. ¡Oh! me hiere el alma oir desgarrar una pasión hasta convertirla en jirones y verdaderos guiñapos,hediendo los oídos de los "mosqueteros" que por lo general,son incapaces apreciar otra cosa que incomprensibles pantomimas y barullo. De buena gana mandaría azotar a ese energúmeno por exagerar el tipo de Termagante....¡¡Esto es ser más herodista que Herodes...!¡ Evitalo tú,por favor! No seas tampoco demasiado tímido;en ésto tu propia discreción debe guiarte. Que la acción corresponda a la palabra y la palabra a la acción,poniendo un especial cuidado en no traspasar los límites de la sencillez de la naturaleza,porque todo lo que a ella se opone ,se aparta igualmente del propio fin del arte dramático,cuyo objeto, tanto en su origen como en los tiempos que corren,ha sido y es ,presentar,por decirlo así,un espejo a la Humanidad ; Mostrar a la virtud sus propios rasgos,al vicio su verdadera imgen y a cadaedad y generación su fisonomía y sello caraterístico . De donde resulta que si se carga la expresión o si esta languidece,por más que ello haga reir a los ignorantes,no podrá menos de disgustar a los discretos ,cuyo dictamen,aunque se trate de un solo hombre,debe pesar más en vuestra estima que el de todo un público compuesto de los otros. ¡Oh! cómicos hay a quienes he visto representar y a los que he oído elogiar ,y en alto grado,que, por no decirlo en malos términos, no teniendo ni acento ni traza de cristianos,de gentiles,ni tan siquiera de hombres,se pavoneaban y vociferaban de tal modo que llegué a pensar si proponiéndose algún mal artífice de la Naturaleza formar tal casta de hombres,le resultaron unos engendros: ¡Tan abominablemente imitaban la Humanidad! ¡Oh! Corregidlo del todo! y no permitáis que los que hacen de graciosos ejecuten más de lo que les esté indicado,porque alguno de ellos empiezan a dar risotadas para hacer reir a unos cuantos espectadores imbéciles,aún cuando en aquel preciso momento algún punto esencial de la pieza reclame la atención. Esto es indigno,y revela en los insensatos que lo practican la más estúpida pretensión.Id a prepararos

By Anonym 19 Sep

Shakespeare

Well said, old mole!

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

porque a noite é noite, o dia é dia, e o tempo é tempo, seria perder sem proveito a noite, o dia e o tempo; por isso, visto que a concisão é a alma do espirito, emquanto que a prolixidade é só o corpo ou o involucro exterior, serei breve

By Anonym 19 Sep

Patricia Briggs

This place looks like the last scene in Hamlet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Neil Gaiman

I know that David Tennant's Hamlet isn't till July. And lots of people are going to be doing Dr Who in Hamlet jokes, so this is just me getting it out of the way early, to avoid the rush... "To be, or not to be, that is the question. Weeelll.... More of A question really. Not THE question. Because, well, I mean, there are billions and billions of questions out there, and well, when I say billions, I mean, when you add in the answers, not just the questions, weeelll, you're looking at numbers that are positively astronomical and... for that matter the other question is what you lot are doing on this planet in the first place, and er, did anyone try just pushing this little red button?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rebecca Mcnutt

Her gaze wavered towards one of the books on the sales counter beside the register, a hardcover copy of Shakespeare’s Hamlet with many of the pages dog-eared and stained with coffee and tea. The store owner caught her looking at it and slid it across the counter towards her. “You ever read Hamlet?” he questioned. “I tried to when I was in high school,” said Mandy, picking up the book and flipping it over to read the back. “I mean, it’s expected that everyone should like Shakespeare’s books and plays, but I just….” her words faltered when she noticed him laughing to himself. “What’s so funny, Sir?” she added, slightly offended. “…Oh, I’m not laughing at you, just with you,” said the store owner. “Most people who say they love Shakespeare only pretend to love his work. You’re honest Ma’am, that’s all. You see, the reason you and so many others are put-off by reading Shakespeare is because reading his words on paper, and seeing his words in action, in a play as they were meant to be seen, are two separate things… and if you can find a way to relate his plays to yourself, you’ll enjoy them so much more because you’ll feel connected to them. Take Hamlet for example – Hamlet himself is grieving over a loss in his life, and everyone is telling him to move on but no matter how hard he tries to, in the end all he can do is to get even with the ones who betrayed him.” “…Wow, when you put it that way… sure, I think I’ll buy a copy just to try reading, why not?” Mandy replied with a smile.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Iris Murdoch

The theatre is a tragic place, full of endings and partings and heartbreak. You dedicate yourself passionately to something, to a project, to people, to a family, you think of nothing else for weeks and months, then suddenly it's over, it's perpetual destruction, perpetual divorce, perpetual adieu. It's like éternel retour, it's a koan. It's like falling in love and being smashed over and over again.’ 'You do, then, fall in love.’ 'Only with fictions, I love players, but actors are so ephemeral. And then there’s waiting for the perfect part, and being offered it the day after you've committed yourself to something utterly rotten. The remorse, and the envy and the jealousy. An old actor told me if I wanted to stay in the trade I had better kill off envy and jealousy at the start.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare W.

Não sejas tu, como certos pastores sem virtude, que indicam às suas ovelhas o caminho escarpado e espinhoso que conduz ao céu, enquanto eles, libertinos, fogosos e sem pudor, trilham o caminho das flores, da licença, e são a antítese das suas palavras.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Shakespeare

Who would fardels bear, To groan and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscovered country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus, conscience does make cowards of us all;

By Anonym 16 Sep

Tom Stoppard

GUIL: It [Hamlet's madness] really boils down to symptoms. Pregnant replies, mystic allusions, mistaken identities, arguing his father is his mother, that sort of thing; intimations of suicide, forgoing of exercise, loss of mirth, hints of claustrophobia not to say delusions of imprisonment; invocations of camels, chameleons, capons, whales, weasels, hawks, handsaws -- riddles, quibbles and evasions; amnesia, paranoia, myopia; day-dreaming, hallucinations; stabbing his elders, abusing his parents, insulting his lover, and appearing hatless in public -- knock-kneed, droop-stockinged and sighing like a love-sick schoolboy, which at his age is coming on a bit strong. ROS: And talking to himself. GUIL: And talking to himself.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Carlo Rovelli

It is hardly surprising that there are more things in heaven and earth, dear reader, than have been dreamed of in our philosophy - or in our physics.

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember; and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts... There’s fennel for you, and columbines; there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me; we may call it herb of grace o’ Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy. I would give you some violets, but they wither’d all when my father died. They say he made a good end,— [Sings.] “For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare

Morir es dormir... y tal vez soñar.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shakespeare

Huye siempre de mezclarte en disputas; pero una vez metido en ellas, obra de manera que tu contrario huya de ti.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

Mother, you have my father much offended.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shakespeare William

Fais-le-moi vite connaître, pour qu'avec des ailes rapides comme l'idée ou les pensées de l'amour, je vole à la vengeance ! (Hamlet, Acte I, Scène V)

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen King

Danny strolled to the town common, sat on one of the benches in Teenytown and took one of the bottles out of the bag, looking down on it like Hamlet with Yorick's skull

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jasper Fforde

I am by turns a petulant adolescent and a mature man, a melancholy loner and a wit telling actors their trade. I cannot decide whether I'm a philosopher or a moping teenager, a poet or a murderer, a procrastinator or a man of action. I might be truly mad or sane pretending to be mad or even mad pretending to be sane.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare

O good Horatio, what a wounded name, Things standing thus unknown, shall live behind me! If thou didst ever hold me in thy heart Absent thee from felicity awhile, And in this harsh world draw thy breath in pain, To tell my story. . . O, I die, Horatio;

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen King

At være eller ikke være - det gider vi sgu ikke lære!

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

Mad I call it, for to define true madness, what is't to be nothing else but mad?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jules Verne

In my nervous frame of mind I expected to see the ghost of Hamlet wandering on the legendary castle terrace.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lin-manuel Miranda

Hamlet' dwarfs 'Hamilton' - it dwarfs pretty much everything - but there's a revealing similarity between them. Shakespeare's longest play leaves its audience in the dark about some basic and seemingly crucial facts. It's not as if the Bard forgot, in the course of all those words, to tell us whether Hamlet was crazy or only pretending: He wanted us to wonder. He forces us to work on a puzzle that has no definite answer. And this mysteriousness is one reason why we find the play irresistible. 'Hamilton' is riddled with question marks. The first act begins with a question, and so does the second. The entire relationship between Hamilton and Burr is based on a mutual and explicit lack of comprehension: 'I will never understand you,' says Hamilton, and Burr wonders, 'What it is like in his shoes?' Again and again, Lin distinguishes characters by what they wish they knew. 'What'd I miss?' asks Jefferson in the song that introduces him. 'Would that be enough?' asks Eliza in the song that defines her. 'Why do you write like you're running out of time?' asks everybody in a song that marvels at Hamilton's drive, and all but declares that there's no way to explain it. 'Hamilton', like 'Hamlet', gives an audience the chance to watch a bunch of conspicuously intelligent and well-spoken characters fill the stage with 'words, words, words,' only to discover, again and again, the limits to what they can comprehend.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shakespeare William

Prête l'oreille à tous, mais tes paroles au petit nombre. Prends l'opinion de chacun ; mais réserve ton jugement. (Polonius, Acte I, Scène III)

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

HAMLET I will receive it sir with all diligence of spirit. Put your bonnet to his right use, 'tis for the head. OSRIC I thank you lordship, it is very hot. HAMLET No believe me, 'tis very cold, the wind is northerly. OSRIC It is indifferent cold my lord, indeed. HAMLET But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion. OSRIC Exceedingly my lord, it is very sultry, as 'twere - I cannot tell how. But my lord, his majesty bade me signify to you that a has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter - HAMLET I beseech you remember. (Hamlet moves him to put on his hat)

By Anonym 19 Sep

Amy Stewart

They are near the bottom of the food chain - a meal for fish and birds - while humans eat from the top of the food chain, consuming an astonishing array of what lies on the planet. But eventually, even we become food for the worms. Shakespeare saw this connection, writing in Hamlet, "A man may fish with a worm that hath eat of a king, and eat of a fish that hath fed of that worm.

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

They say an old man is twice a child

By Anonym 18 Sep

D. K. Marley

Something smelled rotten in Denmark. The odor lilted more rank than the slimy cabbage leaves and maggot-boiling mutton discarded in a heap behind the royal kitchen, or more than the moldy cheesed breath of Orrick, the tavern owner in the village, when he blasted a laugh between the yellow posts of his teeth. The putrid aroma drifted on the wind like the blasts of winter, permeating the stone walls of Elsinore Castle in a hard, cold, bitter wetness, and growing along the dark corridors, spreading and eating away at the peace of the entire Kingdom and her inhabitants. - Prince of Sorrows

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jasper Fforde

To each our own Hamlet.

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

The time is out of joint—O cursèd spite, That ever I was born to set it right!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Iris Murdoch

Clement, usually a fluent speaker in any situation, could hear his voice assuming a pompous and affected tone, not unlike that which many actors use (wrongly in Clement's view) when playing Polonius.

By Anonym 17 Sep

D. K. Marley

My Lord, the tale begins with a ghost... - Prince of Sorrows

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stephen King

They waited, none of them entirely convinced that the old man wouldn't appear before them again like the ghost of Hamlet's father or Jacob Marley or some other...

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sigmund Freud

We all still show too little respect for nature, which in Leonardo's deep words recalling Hamlet's speech "is full of infinite reasons which never appeared in experience." Every one of us human beings corresponds to one of the infinite experiments in which these "reasons of nature" force themselves into experience.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar. Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel, But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade.

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

Existir o no existir, ésta es la cuestión. ¿Cuál es más digna acción del ánimo, sufrir los tiros penetrantes de la fortuna injusta, u oponer los brazos a este torrente de calamidades, y darlas fin con atrevida resistencia? Morir es dormir. ¿No más? ¿Y por un sueño, diremos las aflicciones se acabaron y los dolores sin número, patrimonio de nuestra débil naturaleza?... Este es un término que deberíamos solicitar con ansia. Morir es dormir... y tal vez soñar.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shakespeare

Si el hombre, al terminar su vida, ignora siempre lo que podría ocurrir después, ¿qué importaría que la pierda tarde o presto?

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sophocles Carson Anne

Many terribly quiet customers exist but none more terribly quiet than Man his footsteps pass so perilously soft across the sea in marble winter up the stiff blue waves and every Tuesday down he grinds the unastonishable earth with horse and shatter shatters too the cheeks of birds and traps them in his forest headlights salty silvers roll into his net, he weaves it just for that, this terribly quiet customer he dooms animals and mountains technically by yoke he makes the bull bend, the horse to its knees...

By Anonym 19 Sep

Nurudeen Ushawu

To every corner of the planet, to the young and old, to all humanity. I see your beauty. I really do.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Maryrose Wood

I will have the children read Hamlet as soon as it is practical. There are some useful cautions against eavesdropping to be gleaned from that.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Johnny Rich

Doing nothing was as honourable as any available course of action. Think of Hamlet, think of Job, think of Jesus before Pilate.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kevin Hearne

Hamlet promised himself he’d throw down afterward, but I think perhaps when he said, “From this time forth, my thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!” the limits of blank verse weakened his resolve somehow. If he’d been free to follow the dictates of his conscience rather than the pen of Shakespeare, perhaps he would have abandoned verse altogether, like me, and contented himself with this instead: “Bring it, muthafuckas. Bring it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Aldous Huxley

He was digging in his garden--digging, too, in his own mind, laboriously turning up the substance of his thought. Death--and he drove in his spade once, and again, and yet again. And all our yesterdays have lighted fools they way to dusty death. A convincing thunder rumbled through the words. He lifted another spadeful of earth. Why had Linda died? Why had she been allowed to become gradually less than human and at last... He shuddered. A good kissing carrion. He planted his foot on his spade and stamped it fiercely into the tough ground. As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods; they kills us for their sport. Thunder again; words that proclaimed themselves true--truer somehow than truth itself. And yet that same Gloucester had called them ever-gentle gods. Besides, thy best of rest is sleep, and that thou oft provok'st; yet grossly fear'st thy death which is no more. No more than sleep. Sleep. Perchance to dream. His spade struck against a stone; he stooped to pick it up. For in that sleep of death, what dreams...?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Thomas Henry Huxley

In fact a favourite problem of Tyndall is—Given the molecular forces in a mutton chop, deduce Hamlet or Faust therefrom. He is confident that the Physics of the Future will solve this easily.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lisa Mantchev

He dodged remarkably fast for a melancholy introvert.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dmitry Merezhkovsky

A thought expressed is a falsehood." In poetry what is not said and yet gleams through the beauty of the symbol, works more powerfully on the heart than that which is expressed in words. Symbolism makes the very style, the very artistic substance of poetry inspired, transparent, illuminated throughout like the delicate walls of an alabaster amphora in which a flame is ignited. Characters can also serve as symbols. Sancho Panza and Faust, Don Quixote and Hamlet, Don Juan and Falstaff, according to the words of Goethe, are "schwankende Gestalten." Apparitions which haunt mankind, sometimes repeatedly from age to age, accompany mankind from generation to generation. It is impossible to communicate in any words whatsoever the idea of such symbolic characters, for words only define and restrict thought, but symbols express the unrestricted aspect of truth. Moreover we cannot be satisfied with a vulgar, photographic exactness of experimental photoqraphv. We demand and have premonition of, according to the allusions of Flaubert, Maupassant, Turgenev, Ibsen, new and as yet undisclosed worlds of impressionability. This thirst for the unexperienced, in pursuit of elusive nuances, of the dark and unconscious in our sensibility, is the characteristic feature of the coming ideal poetry. Earlier Baudelaire and Edgar Allan Poe said that the beautiful must somewhat amaze, must seem unexpected and extraordinary. French critics more or less successfully named this feature - impressionism. Such are the three major elements of the new art: a mystical content, symbols, and the expansion of artistic impressionability. No positivistic conclusions, no utilitarian computation, but only a creative faith in something infinite and immortal can ignite the soul of man, create heroes, martyrs and prophets... People have need of faith, they need inspiration, they crave a holy madness in their heroes and martyrs. ("On The Reasons For The Decline And On The New Tendencies In Contemporary Literature")