Best 116 of Hamlet quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen King

Danny strolled to the town common, sat on one of the benches in Teenytown and took one of the bottles out of the bag, looking down on it like Hamlet with Yorick's skull

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

They say an old man is twice a child

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare

Morir es dormir... y tal vez soñar.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Tom Stoppard

GUIL: It [Hamlet's madness] really boils down to symptoms. Pregnant replies, mystic allusions, mistaken identities, arguing his father is his mother, that sort of thing; intimations of suicide, forgoing of exercise, loss of mirth, hints of claustrophobia not to say delusions of imprisonment; invocations of camels, chameleons, capons, whales, weasels, hawks, handsaws -- riddles, quibbles and evasions; amnesia, paranoia, myopia; day-dreaming, hallucinations; stabbing his elders, abusing his parents, insulting his lover, and appearing hatless in public -- knock-kneed, droop-stockinged and sighing like a love-sick schoolboy, which at his age is coming on a bit strong. ROS: And talking to himself. GUIL: And talking to himself.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kevin Hearne

Hamlet promised himself he’d throw down afterward, but I think perhaps when he said, “From this time forth, my thoughts be bloody, or be nothing worth!” the limits of blank verse weakened his resolve somehow. If he’d been free to follow the dictates of his conscience rather than the pen of Shakespeare, perhaps he would have abandoned verse altogether, like me, and contented himself with this instead: “Bring it, muthafuckas. Bring it.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare

OFELIA. ¡Qué corto ha sido! HAMLET. Como cariño de mujer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hanif Kureishi

Act – make an event. Smash the coordinates and see where the smithereens fly. Let in the madness, and be sure to be a danger to oneself and others. Too much thinking turns you into that fool Hamlet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shakespeare

Huye siempre de mezclarte en disputas; pero una vez metido en ellas, obra de manera que tu contrario huya de ti.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dean Koontz

If someone had killed Hamlet in the first act, a lot more people would’ve been alive at the end.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Thomas Henry Huxley

In fact a favourite problem of Tyndall is—Given the molecular forces in a mutton chop, deduce Hamlet or Faust therefrom. He is confident that the Physics of the Future will solve this easily.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shakespeare

Perfume de un momento nada más.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

And these few precepts in thy memory Look thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue, Nor any unproportioned thought his act. Be thou familiar but by no means vulgar. Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, Grapple them unto thy soul with hoops of steel, But do not dull thy palm with entertainment Of each new-hatched, unfledged comrade.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Iris Murdoch

The theatre is a tragic place, full of endings and partings and heartbreak. You dedicate yourself passionately to something, to a project, to people, to a family, you think of nothing else for weeks and months, then suddenly it's over, it's perpetual destruction, perpetual divorce, perpetual adieu. It's like éternel retour, it's a koan. It's like falling in love and being smashed over and over again.’ 'You do, then, fall in love.’ 'Only with fictions, I love players, but actors are so ephemeral. And then there’s waiting for the perfect part, and being offered it the day after you've committed yourself to something utterly rotten. The remorse, and the envy and the jealousy. An old actor told me if I wanted to stay in the trade I had better kill off envy and jealousy at the start.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Neil Gaiman

I know that David Tennant's Hamlet isn't till July. And lots of people are going to be doing Dr Who in Hamlet jokes, so this is just me getting it out of the way early, to avoid the rush... "To be, or not to be, that is the question. Weeelll.... More of A question really. Not THE question. Because, well, I mean, there are billions and billions of questions out there, and well, when I say billions, I mean, when you add in the answers, not just the questions, weeelll, you're looking at numbers that are positively astronomical and... for that matter the other question is what you lot are doing on this planet in the first place, and er, did anyone try just pushing this little red button?

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rebecca Mcnutt

Her gaze wavered towards one of the books on the sales counter beside the register, a hardcover copy of Shakespeare’s Hamlet with many of the pages dog-eared and stained with coffee and tea. The store owner caught her looking at it and slid it across the counter towards her. “You ever read Hamlet?” he questioned. “I tried to when I was in high school,” said Mandy, picking up the book and flipping it over to read the back. “I mean, it’s expected that everyone should like Shakespeare’s books and plays, but I just….” her words faltered when she noticed him laughing to himself. “What’s so funny, Sir?” she added, slightly offended. “…Oh, I’m not laughing at you, just with you,” said the store owner. “Most people who say they love Shakespeare only pretend to love his work. You’re honest Ma’am, that’s all. You see, the reason you and so many others are put-off by reading Shakespeare is because reading his words on paper, and seeing his words in action, in a play as they were meant to be seen, are two separate things… and if you can find a way to relate his plays to yourself, you’ll enjoy them so much more because you’ll feel connected to them. Take Hamlet for example – Hamlet himself is grieving over a loss in his life, and everyone is telling him to move on but no matter how hard he tries to, in the end all he can do is to get even with the ones who betrayed him.” “…Wow, when you put it that way… sure, I think I’ll buy a copy just to try reading, why not?” Mandy replied with a smile.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Shakespeare

Not that I think you did not love your father; ut that I know love is begun by time; and that I see, in passages of proof, time quilifies the spark and fire of it. There lives within the ery flame of love a kind of wick or snuff that will abate it; and nothing is at a like goodness still; for goodnes, growing to a plurisy, dies in his own too much: that we would do, we should do when we would; for this "would" changes and hath abatements and delays as many as tere are tongues, are hands, are accidents; and then this "should" is like a spendthrift sigh, that hurts by easing. But, to the quick o' the ulcer: what would you undertake, to show yourself your father's son in deed more than in words?

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

We are arrant knaves all, believe none of us.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shakespeare William

Prête l'oreille à tous, mais tes paroles au petit nombre. Prends l'opinion de chacun ; mais réserve ton jugement. (Polonius, Acte I, Scène III)

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

But I have that within which passes show. these but the trappings and the suits of woe

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen King

At være eller ikke være - det gider vi sgu ikke lære!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Iris Murdoch

Clement, usually a fluent speaker in any situation, could hear his voice assuming a pompous and affected tone, not unlike that which many actors use (wrongly in Clement's view) when playing Polonius.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jasper Fforde

To each our own Hamlet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

HAMLET I will receive it sir with all diligence of spirit. Put your bonnet to his right use, 'tis for the head. OSRIC I thank you lordship, it is very hot. HAMLET No believe me, 'tis very cold, the wind is northerly. OSRIC It is indifferent cold my lord, indeed. HAMLET But yet methinks it is very sultry and hot for my complexion. OSRIC Exceedingly my lord, it is very sultry, as 'twere - I cannot tell how. But my lord, his majesty bade me signify to you that a has laid a great wager on your head. Sir, this is the matter - HAMLET I beseech you remember. (Hamlet moves him to put on his hat)

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

I essentially am not in madness, but mad in craft.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henry Miller

I can never forget that Chinese student I knew in Paris - Mr. Tcheou, I think it was. One day, upon asking him if he had ever read Hamlet, he answered: "You mean that novel by Jack London?

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember; and there is pansies, that’s for thoughts... There’s fennel for you, and columbines; there’s rue for you, and here’s some for me; we may call it herb of grace o’ Sundays. O, you must wear your rue with a difference. There’s a daisy. I would give you some violets, but they wither’d all when my father died. They say he made a good end,— [Sings.] “For bonny sweet Robin is all my joy.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

Mes turime kalbėtis, sverdami kiekvieną žodelį, nes, kitaip, žūsime nuo dviprasmiškumo.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

Mother, you have my father much offended.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Richard Baxter

what a silly, frail, and forward pieces are the best of men (647)!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Thomas C Foster

If a story is no good, being based on Hamlet won't save it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John C. Wright

Imagine the same scene in HAMLET if Pullman had written it. Hamlet, using a mystic pearl, places the poison in the cup to kill Claudius. We are all told Claudius will die by drinking the cup. Then Claudius dies choking on a chicken bone at lunch. Then the Queen dies when Horatio shows her the magical Mirror of Death. This mirror appears in no previous scene, nor is it explained why it exists. Then Ophelia summons up the Ghost from Act One and kills it, while she makes a speech denouncing the evils of religion. Ophelia and Hamlet are parted, as it is revealed in the last act that a curse will befall them if they do not part ways.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Emily Thorne

As Hamlet said to Ophelia, ”God has given you one face, and you make yourself another." The battle between these two halves of identity...Who we are and who we pretend to be, is unwinnable. "Just as there are two sides to every story, there are two sides to every person. One that we reveal to the world and another we keep hidden inside. A duality governed by the balance of light and darkness, within each of us is the capacity for both good and evil. But those who are able to blur the moral dividing line hold the true power.

By Anonym 18 Sep

D. K. Marley

Something smelled rotten in Denmark. The odor lilted more rank than the slimy cabbage leaves and maggot-boiling mutton discarded in a heap behind the royal kitchen, or more than the moldy cheesed breath of Orrick, the tavern owner in the village, when he blasted a laugh between the yellow posts of his teeth. The putrid aroma drifted on the wind like the blasts of winter, permeating the stone walls of Elsinore Castle in a hard, cold, bitter wetness, and growing along the dark corridors, spreading and eating away at the peace of the entire Kingdom and her inhabitants. - Prince of Sorrows

By Anonym 18 Sep

Shakespeare

¿Quién podría tolerar tanta opresión, sudando gimiendo bajo el peso de una vida molesta si no fuese que el temor de que existe alguna cosa más allá de la Muerte (aquel país desconocido de cuyos límites ningún caminante torna) nos embaraza en dudas y nos hace sufrir los males que nos cercan; antes que ir a buscar otros de que no tenemos seguro conocimiento?

By Anonym 17 Sep

T. S. Eliot

No I am not Prince Hamlet nor was meant to be Am an attendant lord one that will do To swell a progress start a scene or two Advise the prince no doubt an easy tool Deferential glad to be of use Politic cautious and meticulous Full of high sentence but a bit obtuse At times indeed almost ridiculous— Almost at times the Fool. I grow old … I grow old … I shall wear the bottoms of my trousers rolled. Shall I part my hair behind Do I dare to eat a peach I shall wear white flannel trousers and walk upon the beach. I have heard the mermaids singing each to each. I do not think that they will sing to me. I have seen them riding seaward on the waves Combing the white hair of the waves blown back When the wind blows the water white and black. We have lingered in the chambers of the sea By sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brown Till human voices wake us and we drown.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

¿Aparentar? No señora, yo no sé aparentar. Ni el color negro de este manto, ni el traje acostumbrado en solemnes lutos, ni los interrumpidos sollozos, ni en los ojos un abundante río, ni la dolorida expresión del semblante, junto con las fórmulas, los ademanes, las exterioridades de sentimiento; bastarán por sí solos, mi querida madre, a manifestar el verdadero afecto que me ocupa el ánimo. Estos signos aparentan, es verdad; pero son acciones que un hombre puede fingir... Aquí, aquí dentro tengo lo que es más que apariencia, lo restante no es otra cosa que atavíos y adornos del dolor.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

She is so conjunctive to my life and soul, that, as the star moves not but in his sphere, I could not but by her.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

...O, woe is me, To have seen what I have seen, see what I see!

By Anonym 17 Sep

D. K. Marley

My Lord, the tale begins with a ghost... - Prince of Sorrows

By Anonym 15 Sep

Johnny Rich

Doing nothing was as honourable as any available course of action. Think of Hamlet, think of Job, think of Jesus before Pilate.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Hector Berlioz

...imagine anybody having lived forty-five or fifty years without knowing Hamlet! One might as well spend one's life in a coal mine.

By Anonym 16 Sep

William Shakespeare

God has given you one face, and you make yourselves another . . .

By Anonym 18 Sep

Orson Scott Card

Scholars don't have blood flowing in their veins," said Hamlet. "When they're wounded, they bleed logic, and when all of it is gone, their brains die, and they become ... soldiers.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Patricia Briggs

This place looks like the last scene in Hamlet.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

More grief to hide than hate to utter love. Polonius, Hamlet.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Thomas Henry Huxley

In fact a favourite problem of [John Tyndall] is—Given the molecular forces in a mutton chop, deduce Hamlet or Faust therefrom. He is confident that the Physics of the Future will solve this easily.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ali Salami

Shakespeare’s woes and concerns are all human and can be easily perceived by any reader regardless of religious, ethnic, or educational backgrounds. To him, human vices are not only odious but pathetic as well. Hypocrisy irks him tremendously, and he is sharply aware of its stings when he says: “God has given you one face, and you make yourself another” (Hamlet 3.1.).

By Anonym 16 Sep

Bryana Johnson

It is something to have gazed on the constellated white, felt it running from the eyes and the pores: the salt of love. It is something to have whispered wild thank-yous in the only ways we know how.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Shakespeare

Who would fardels bear, To groan and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscovered country, from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of? Thus, conscience does make cowards of us all;