Best 1 061 of Leo Tolstoy quotes - MyQuotes

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Leo Tolstoy
By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

I now understand that my welfare is only possible if I acknowledge my unity with all the people of the world without exception.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The highest wisdom has but one science-the science of the whole-the science explaining the whole creation and man's place in it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

But the peasants - how do the peasants die?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Some mathematician said that pleasure lies not in discovering the truth but in searching for it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

So he lived, not knowing and not seeing any chance of knowing what he was and for what purpose he had been placed in the word.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The terrible thing is that it's impossible to tear the past out by the roots.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

This prince enjoyed exceptionally good health, even for a prince ; and, owing to his gymnastic exercises and the scrupulous care he took of himself, notwithstanding the excesses to which he let his love for pleasure carry him, he remained as fresh as a great, green, shiny Dutch cucumber.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Live in the needs of the day.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Why does an apple fall when it is ripe? Is it brought down by the force of gravity? Is it because its stalk withers? Because it is dried by the sun, because it grows too heavy, or because the boy standing under the tree wants to eat it? None of these is the cause.... Every action of theirs, that seems to them an act of their own freewill is in the historical sense not free at all but is bound up with the whole course of history and preordained from all eternity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The most mentally deranged people are certainly those who see in others indications of insanity they do not notice in themselves.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

I feel even more incapable of returning to Russia the same as when I left it. It's just one more of those legends in Russia, confirmed by Passek, Sleptsov and others, that one only has to come to the Caucasus to be showered with decorations. Everyone expects it of us, demands it of us. But I've been here two years, taken part in two expeditions and received nothing. For all that, I've so much pride that I won't leave this place until I'm a major, with an Anna or a Vladimir round my neck. I've reached the point where it really rankles when some Gnilokishkin is decorated and I'm not. What's more, how could I look my elder in the face again, or merchant Kotel'nikov to whom I sell grain, or my aunt in Moscow and all those fine gentlemen in Russia, if I return after two years in the Caucasus with nothing to show for it? No, I don't want to know those gentlemen and I'm sure that they couldn't care less about me. But such is man's nature that though I couldn't give a damn about them they're the reason why I'm ruining the best years of my life, my happiness and whole future.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The idea, shared by many, that life is a vale of tears, is just as false as the idea shared by the great majority, the idea to which youth and health and riches incline you, that life is a place of entertainment. Life is a place of service, and in that service one has to suffer a great deal that is hard to bear, but more often to experience a great deal of joy. But that joy can be real only if people look upon their life as a service, and have a definite object in life outside themselves and their personal happiness.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

In the depths of his soul Ivan Ilyich knew that he was dying... he simply did not, he could not possibly understand it. The example of a syllogism he had studied in Kiesewetter's logic - Caius is a man, men are mortal, therefore Caius is mortal-- had seemed to him all his life to be correct only in relation to Caius, but by no means himself. For the man Caius, man in general, it was perfectly correct; but he was not Caius and not man in general, he had always been quite, quite separate from all other human beings...And Caius is indeed mortal, and it's right that he die, but for me, Vanya, Ivan Ilyich, with all my feelings and thoughts-- for me it's another matter. And it cannot be that I should die. It would be too terrible. So it felt to him.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The sobs and tears of joy he had not foreseen rose with such force within him that his whole body shook and for a long time prevented him from speaking. Falling on his knees by her bed. He held his wife's hand to his lips and kissed it, and her hand responded to his kisses with weak movement of finger. Meanwhile, at the foot of the bed, in the midwife's expert hands, like the flame of a lamp, flickered the life of a human being who had never existed before.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

There are such repulsive faces in the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

If you make it a habit not to blame others, you will feel the growth of the ability to love in your soul, and you will see the growth of goodness in your life.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Since the moment when, at the sight of his beloved and dying brother, Levin for the first time looked at the questions of life and death in the light of the new convictions, as he called them, which between the ages of twenty and thirty-four had imperceptibly replaced the beliefs of his childhood and youth, he had been less horrified by death than by life without the least knowledge of whence it came, what it is for, why, and what it is, Organisms, their destruction, the indestructibility of matter, the law of the conservation of energy, development—the terms that had superseded these beliefs—were very useful for mental purposes; but they gave no guidance for life, and Levin suddenly felt like a person who has exchanged a thick fur coat for a muslin garment and who, being out in the frost for the first time, becomes clearly convinced, not by arguments, but with the whole of his being, that he is as good as naked and that he must inevitably perish miserably.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The religious superstition is encouraged by means of the institution of churches, processions, monuments, festivities....The so-called clergy stupefy the masses....They befog the people and keep them in an eternal condition of stupefaction.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Upon meeting, you're judged by your clothes, upon parting you're judged by your wits.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

I wanted movement and not a calm course of existence. I wanted excitement and the chance to sacrifice myself for my love. I felt it in myself a superabundance of energy which found no outlet in our quiet life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Nowadays, as before, the public declaration and confession of Orthodoxy is usually encountered among dull-witted, cruel and immoral people who tend to consider themselves very important. Whereas intelligence, honesty, straightforwardness, good-naturedness and morality are qualities usually found among people who claim to be non-believers.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

We are forced to fall back on fatalism as an explanation of irrational events (that is to say, events the reasonableness of which we do not understand). The more we try to explain such events in history reasonably, the more unreasonable and incomprehensible do they become to us.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

It is not enough to be a hardworking person. Think: what do you work at?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The higher a man stands on the social ladder, the greater the number of people he is connected with, the more power he has over other people, the more obvious is the predestination and inevitability of his every action.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Human science fragments everything in order to understand it, kills everything in order to examine it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

It was as if the main screw in his head, which held his whole life together, had become stripped. The screw would not go in, would not come out, but turned in the same groove without catching hold, and it was impossible to stop turning it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

It hurt her to stir up these feelings, but yet she knew that that was the best part of her soul, and that that part of her soul would quickly be smothered in the life she was leading.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

There is only one time that is important -- NOW! It is the most important time because it is the only time hat we have any power.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Life is fragile and absurd.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Vronsky meanwhile, in spite of the complete fulfilment of what he had so long desired, was not completely happy. He soon felt that the realization of his longing gave him only one grain of the mountain of bliss he had anticipated. That realization showed him the eternal error men make by imagining that happiness consists in the gratification of their wishes. When first he united his life with hers and donned civilian clothes, he felt the delight of freedom in general, such as he had not before known, and also the freedom of love—he was contented then, but not for long. Soon he felt rising in his soul a desire for desires—boredom. Involuntarily he began to snatch at every passing caprice, mistaking it for a desire and a purpose.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Seas of blood have been shed for the sake of patriotism. One would expect the harm and irrationality of patriotism to be self-evident to everyone. But the surprising fact is that cultured and learned people not only do not notice the harm and stupidity of patriotism, they resist every unveiling of it with the greatest obstinacy and passion (with no rational grounds), and continue to praise it as beneficent and elevating.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Perfection is impossible without humility. Why should I strive for perfection, if I am already good enough?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The most important time is Now

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Blessed are the peacemakers; theirs is the kingdom of heaven

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

I assure you that I sleep anywhere, and always like a dormouse.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Three things are needed to educate the peasantry: schools, schools, and schools.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

All men's instincts, all their impulses in life, are efforts to increase their freedom. Wealth and poverty, health and disease, culture and ignorance, labor and leisure, repletion and hunger, virtue and vice, are all terms for greater or less degree of freedom.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

I've always loved you, and when you love someone, you love the whole person, just as he or she is, and not as you would like them to be.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Each time of life has its own kind of love.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The Anarchists are right in everything; in the negation of the existing order and in the assertion that, without Authority there could not be worse violence than that of Authority under existing conditions.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

All at once I felt clearly and calmly that the feeling of that time had gone never to return, like the time itself, and that to bring it back now would be not only impossible, but painful and forced.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Ivan Ilych saw that he was dying, and he was in continual despair. In the depth of his heart he knew he was dying, but not only was he not accustomed to the thought, he simply did not and could not grasp it. The syllogism he had learnt from Kiesewetter's Logic: "Caius is a man, men are mortal, therefore Caius is mortal," had always seemed to him correct as applied to Caius, but certainly not as applied to himself. That Caius - man in the abstract - was mortal, was perfectly correct, but he was not Caius, not an abstract man, but a creature quite, quite separate from all others.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Then he thought himself unhappy, but happiness was all in the future; now he felt that the best happiness was already in the past.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

While I doubted, I had hope; but now there is no hope left and all the same I doubt everything.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

He had never thought the question over clearly, but vaguely imagined that his wife had long suspected him of being unfaithful to her and was looking the other way. It even seemed to him that she, a worn-out, aged, no longer beautiful woman, not remarkable for anything, simple, merely a kind mother of a family, ought in all fairness to be indulgent. It turned out to be quite the opposite.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

The truth is obtained like gold, not by letting it grow bigger, but by washing off from it everything that isn't gold

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

We are all created to be miserable, and that we all know it, and all invent means of deceiving each other. And when one sees the truth, what is one to do?

By Anonym 17 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Next day at the review the Tsar asked Prince Andrey where he desired to serve; and Bolkonsky ruined his chances for ever in the court world by asking to be sent to the front, instead of begging for a post in attendance on the Tsar's person.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

To tell the truth is very difficult, and young people are rarely capable of it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

An elder sister came from the town to visit her younger sister in the country. This elder sister was married to a merchant and the younger to a peasant in the village. The two sisters sat down for a talk over a cup of tea and the elder started boasting about the superiority of town life, with all its comforts, the fine clothes her children wore, the exquisite food and drink, parties and visits to the theatre. The younger sister resented this and in turn scoffed at the life of a merchant's wife and sang the praise of her own life as a peasant. 'I wouldn't care to change my life for yours,' she said. 'I admit mine is dull, but at least we have no worries. You live in grander style, but you must do a great deal of business or you'll be ruined. You know the proverb, "Loss is Gain's elder brother." One day you are rich and the next you might find yourself out in the street. Here in the country we don't have these ups and downs. A peasant's life may be poor, but it's long. Although we may never be rich, we'll always have enough to eat.' Then the elder sister said her piece. 'Enough to eat but nothing but those filthy pigs and calves! What do you know about nice clothes and good manners! However hard your good husband slaves away you'll spend your lives in the muck and that's where you'll die. And the same goes for your children.' 'Well, what of it?' the younger answered. 'That's how it is here. But at least we know where we are. We don't have to crawl to anyone and we're afraid of no one. But you in town are surrounded by temptations. All may be well one day, the next the Devil comes along and tempts your husband with cards, women and drink. And then you're ruined. It does happen, doesn't it?