Best 60 of Robert H. Jackson quotes - MyQuotes

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Robert H. Jackson
By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Our people do not want barren theories from their democracy. Maury Maverick has expressed very quaintly, but clearly, what they really want when he says: 'We Americans want to talk, pray, think as we please and eat regular'.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The privilege of opening the first trial in history for crimes against the peace of the world imposes a grave responsibility. The wrongs, which we seek to condemn and punish, have been so calculated, so malignant, and so devastating, that civilization cannot tolerate their being ignored, because it cannot survive their being repeated. That four great nations, flushed with victory and stung with injury, stay the hand of vengeance and voluntarily submit their captive enemies to the judgment of the law is one of the most significant tributes that power has ever paid to reason.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

In this court the parties changed positions as nimbly as if dancing a quadrille.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

To believe that patriotism will not flourish if patriotic ceremonies are voluntary and spontaneous instead of a compulsory routine is to make an unflattering estimate of the appeal of our institutions to free minds.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein." [West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943)]

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

It is not the function of government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the government from falling into error.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

We must make clear to the Germans that the wrong for which their fallen leaders are on trial is not that they lost the war, but that they started it. And we must not allow ourselves to be drawn into a trial of the causes of the war, for our position is that no grievances or policies will justify resort to aggressive war. It is utterly renounced and condemned as an instrument of policy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Of course, such judicial misconstruction theoretically can be cured by constitutional amendment. But the period of gestation of a constitutional amendment, or of any law reform, is reckoned in decades usually; in years, at least. And, after all, as the Court itself asserted in overruling the minimum-wage cases, it may not be the Constitution that was at fault.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The office of the lawyer ... is too delicate, personal and confident to be occupied by a corporation.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

It is not the function of our Government to keep the citizen from falling into error; it is the function of the citizen to keep the Government from falling into error.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Particularly when the war power is invoked to do things to the liberties of people, or to their property or economy that only indirectly affect conduct of the war and do not relate to the engagement of the war itself, the constitutional basis should be scrutinized with care. ... I would not be willing to hold that war powers may be indefinitely prolonged merely by keeping legally alive a state of war that had in fact ended. I cannot accept the argument that war powers last as long as the effects and consequences of war for if so they are permanent -- as permanent as the war debts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The price of freedom of religion or of speech or of the press is that we must put up with, and even pay for, a good deal of rubbish.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

There is danger that, if the Court does not temper its doctrinaire logic with a little practical wisdom, it will convert the constitutional Bill of Rights into a suicide pact.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The physical power to get the money does not seem to me a test of the right to tax. Might does not make right even in taxation. To hold that what the use of official authority may get the state may keep, and that if it cannot get hold of a nonresident stockholder it may hold the company as hostage for him, is strange constitutional doctrine to me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

This Court is forever adding new stories to the temples of constitutional law, and the temples have a way of collapsing when one story too many is added.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

While the Nation has forbidden monopoly by one set of laws it has been creating them by another. Patent laws, valuable as they may be in some respects, often father monopoly.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Had the jury convicted on proper instructions it would be the end of the matter. But juries are not bound by what seems inescapable logic to judges.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Civil government cannot let any group ride roughshod over others simply because their consciences tell them to do so.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The petitioner's problem is to avoid Scylla without being drawn into Charybdis.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The most odious of all oppressions are those which mask as justice.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Any court which undertakes by its legal processes to enforce civil liberties needs the support of an enlightened and vigorous public opinion which will be intelligent and discriminating as to what cases really are civil liberties cases and what questions really are involved in those cases.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

I do not know whether it is the view of the Court that a judge must be thick-skinned or just thick-headed, but nothing in my experience or observation confirms the idea that he is insensitive to publicity. Who does not prefer good to ill report of his work? And if fame a good public name is, as Milton said, the "last infirmity of noble mind", it is frequently the first infirmity of a mediocre one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The power of citizenship as a shield against oppression was widely known from the example of Paul 's Roman citizenship, which sent the centurion scurrying to his higher-ups with the message: "Take heed what thou doest: for this man is a Roman".

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Due process requires some definite link, some minimum connection, between a state and the person, property or transaction it seeks to tax.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The mere state of being without funds is a neutral fact constitutionally an irrelevance, like race, creed, or color.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

That four great nations, flushed with victory and stung with injury, stay the hand of vengeance and voluntarily submit their captive enemies to the judgment of the law is one of the most significant tributes that Power has ever paid to Reason.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Your job today tells me nothing of your future--your use of your leisure today tells me just what your tomorrow will be.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Not every defeat of authority is a gain for individual freedom, nor every judicial rescue of a convict a victory for liberty.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The Tax Court is independent, and its neutrality is not clouded by prosecuting duties. Its procedures assure fair hearings. Its deliberations are evidenced by careful opinions. All guides to judgment available to judges are habitually consulted and respected. It has established a tradition of freedom from bias and pressures. It deals with a subject that is highly specialized and so complex as to be the despair of judges. It is relatively better staffed for its task than is the judiciary.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Struggles to coerce uniformity of sentiment in support of some end thought essential to their time and country have been waged by many good as well as by evil men. Nationalism is a relatively recent phenomenon but at other times and places the ends have been racial or territorial security, support of a dynasty or regime, and particular plans for saving souls. As first and moderate methods to attain unity have failed, those bent on its accomplishment must resort to an ever-increasing severity. . . . Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. Compulsory unification of opinion achieves only the unanimity of the graveyard. It seems trite but necessary to say that the First Amendment to our Constitution was designed to avoid these ends by avoiding these beginnings. There is no mysticism in the American concept of the State or of the nature or origin of its authority. We set up government by consent of the governed, and the Bill of Rights denies those in power any legal opportunity to coerce that consent. Authority here is to be controlled by public opinion, not public opinion by authority. If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

If we can cultivate in the world the idea that aggressive war-making is the way to the prisoner's dock rather than the way to honors, we will have accomplished something toward making the peace more secure.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Our forefathers found the evils of free thinking more to be endured than the evils of inquest or suppression. This is because thoughtful, bold and independent minds are essential to the wise and considered self-government.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Perhaps you have heard about the college executives who were discussing what they wanted to do after retirement age. One hoped to run a prison or school of correction so that the alumni would never come back to visit. Another chose to manage an orphan asylum so that he would not be plagued with advice from parents.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Freedom to differ is not limited to things that do not matter much. That would be a mere shadow of freedom. The test of its substance is the right to differ as to things that touch the heart of the existing order.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

I cannot say that our country could have no secret police without becoming totalitarian, but I can say with great conviction that it cannot become totalitarian without a centralized national police.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The very purpose of a Bill of Rights was to withdraw certain subjects from the vicissitudes of political controversy. One's right to life, liberty and property, to free speech, a free press, freedom of worship and assembly may not be submitted to vote; they depend on no elections.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

It is possible to hold a faith with enough confidence to believe that what should be rendered to God does not need to be decided and collected by Caesar.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

The priceless heritage of our society is the unrestricted constitutional right of each member to think as he will. Thought control is a copyright of totalitarianism, and we have no claim to it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Reversal by a higher court is not proof that justice is thereby better done. There is no doubt that if there were a super-Supreme Court, a substantial proportion of our reversals of state courts would also be reversed. We are not final because we are infallible, but we are infallible only because we are final.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Government of limited power need not be anemic government. Assurance that rights are secure tends to diminish fear and jealousy of strong government, and by making us feel safe to live under it makes for its better support.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

With the law books filled with a great assortment of crimes, a prosecutor stands a fair chance of finding at least a technical violation of some act on the part of almost anyone. In such a case, it is not a question of discovering the commission of a crime and then looking for the man who has committed it, it is a question of picking the man and then searching the law books, or putting investigators to work, to pin some offense on him.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

I see no reason why I should be consciously wrong today because I was unconsciously wrong yesterday.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

There is no such thing as an achieved liberty: like electricity, there can be no substantial storage and it must be generated as it is enjoyed, or the lights go out.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

If certain acts in violation of treaties are crimes, they are crimes whether the United States does them or whether Germany does them, and we are not prepared to lay down a rule of criminal conduct against others which we would not be willing to have invoked against us.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

We are not final because we are infallible, but infallible only because we are final.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

When the Supreme Court moved to Washington in 1800, it was provided with no books, which probably accounts for the high quality of early opinions.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Education should be a lifelong process, the formal period serving as a foundation on which life's structure may rest and rise.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

It is only the words of the bill that have presidential approval, where that approval is given. It is not to be supposed that in signing a bill the President endorses the whole Congressional Record.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

A person gets from a symbol the meaning he puts into it, and what is one man's comfort and inspiration is another's jest and scorn.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert H. Jackson

Those who begin coercive elimination of dissent soon find themselves exterminating dissenters. Compulsory unification of opinion achieves only the unanimity of the graveyard.