Best 707 of Alexander Pope quotes - MyQuotes

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Alexander Pope
By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

Wit in conversation is only a readiness of thought and a facility of expression, or a quick conception and an easy delivery.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Ambition first sprung from your blest abodes: the glorious fault of angels and of gods.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

Those move easiest who have learn'd to dance.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

An atheist is but a mad, ridiculous derider of piety, but a hypocrite makes a sober jest of God and religion; he finds it easier to be upon his knees than to rise to a good action.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Envy will merit, as its shade, pursue

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

True friendship's laws are by this rule express'd, Welcome the coming, speed the parting guest.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Chiefs who no more in bloody fights engage, But wise through time, and narrative with age, In summer-days like grasshoppers rejoice - A bloodless race, that send a feeble voice.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

No writing is good that does not tend to better mankind in some way or other.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Giving advice is many times only the privilege of saying a foolish thing one's self, under the pretense of hindering another from doing one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

Virtue may choose the high or low degree, 'Tis just alike to virtue, and to me; Dwell in a monk, or light upon a king, She's still the same belov'd, contented thing.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Alexander Pope

Those half-learn'd witlings, num'rous in our isle As half-form'd insects on the banks of Nile

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

In various talk th' instructive hours they past, Who gave the ball, or paid the visit last; One speaks the glory of the British queen, And one describes a charming Indian screen; A third interprets motions, looks, and eyes; At every word a reputation dies.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

What nature wants, commodious gold bestows; 'Tis thus we cut the bread another sows.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Men, some to business, some to pleasure take; But every woman is at heart a rake.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

What woeful stuff this madrigal would be, In some starved hackney sonneteer, or me! But let a lord once own the happy lines, How the wit brightens! how the style refines!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Poets heap virtues, painters gems, at will, And show their zeal, and hide their want of skill.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Expression is the dress of thought, and still Appears more decent as more suitable; A vile conceit in pompous words express'd, Is like a clown in regal purple dress'd.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Oh! blest with temper, whose unclouded ray Can make to-morrow cheerful as to-day.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Good-nature and good-sense must ever join; To err is human, to forgive, divine.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

Who dare to love their country, and be poor.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers came.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

No woman ever hates a man for being in love with her, but many a woman hate a man for being a friend to her.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

And binding nature fast in fate, Left free the human will.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

But those who cannot write, and those who can, All rhyme, and scrawl, and scribble, to a man.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

The character of covetousness, is what a man generally acquires more through some niggardliness or ill grace in little and inconsiderable things, than in expenses of any consequence.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

And see, my son! the hour is on its way, That lifts the Goddess to imperial sway; This favourite isle, long severed from her reign, Doveline, she gathers to her wings again

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Of little use, the man you may suppose, Who says in verse what others say in prose; Yet let me show a poet's of some weight, And (though no soldier) useful to the state, What will a child learn sooner than a song? What better teach a foreigner the tongue? What's long or short, each accent where to place And speak in public with some sort of grace?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

For what I have publish'd, I can only hope to be pardon'd; but for what I have burned, I deserve to be prais'd.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

The doubtful beam long nods from side to side.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

The greatest magnifying glasses in the world are a man's own eyes when they look upon his own person.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

Tis all in vain to keep a constant pother About one vice and fall into another.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

A generous friendship no cold medium knows, Burns with one love, with one resentment glows.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Lend, lend your wings! I mount! I fly! O grave! where is thy victory? O death! where is thy sting?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Order is Heaven's first law; and this confess, Some are and must be greater than the rest.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Behold the child, by Nature's kindly law, Pleased with a rattle, tickled with a straw; Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight, A little louder, but as empty quite; Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage, And beads and prayer-books are the toys of age. Pleased with this bauble still, as that before, Till tired he sleeps, and life's poor play is o'er.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Some judge of authors' names, not works, and then Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Love finds an altar for forbidden fires.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

No louder shrieks to pitying heaven are cast, When husbands or lap-dogs breathe their last.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Nor Fame I slight, nor for her favors call; She comes unlooked for, if she comes at all .

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

To pardon those absurdities in ourselves which we cannot suffer in others is neither better nor worse than to be more willing to be fools ourselves than to have others so.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Is that a birthday? 'tis, alas! too clear; 'Tis but the funeral of the former year.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Party-spirit at best is but the madness of many for the gain of a few.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Our grandsire, Adam, ere of Eve possesst, Alone, and e'en in Paradise unblest, With mournful looks the blissful scenes survey'd, And wander'd in the solitary shade. The Maker say, took pity, and bestow'd Woman, the last, the best reserv'd of God.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

And little eagles wave their wings in gold.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexander Pope

The mouse that always trusts to one poor hole Can never be a mouse of any soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alexander Pope

Nay, fly to altars; there they'll talk you dead; For fools rush in where angels fear to tread.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

Here am I, dying of a hundred good symptoms.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

A brave man thinks no one his superior who does him an injury, for he has it then in his power to make himself superior to the other by forgiving it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Alexander Pope

Philosophy, that leaned on Heaven before, Shrinks to her second cause, and is no more.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Alexander Pope

I am satisfied to trifle away my time, rather than let it stick by me.