Best 9 724 of Science quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Olaf Stapledon

Very soon the heavens presented an extraordinary appearance, for all the stars directly behind me were now deep red, while those directly ahead were violet. Rubies lay behind me, amethysts ahead of me.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Prerak Trivedi

Science and Spirituality are two ends and you have to keep yourself at the middle. Science guys will call it, equilibrium.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Neil Degrasse Tyson

Our five senses are faulty data-taking devices, and they need help.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Kettering

We are just in the kindergarten of uncovering things; there is no downcurve in science.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Patience Johnson

It’s when your plans look dead that God’s resurrection power begins to operate in your life in greater measure

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anton Chekhov

There is no national science, just as there is no national multiplication table; what is national is no longer science.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Norman Pirie

My teacher, Hopkins, often commented on the craving for certainty that led so many physicists into mysticism or into the Church and similar organisations ... Faith seems to be an occupational hazard for physicists.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Bill Gates

The Chinese are clearly inculcating the idea that science is exciting and important, and that's why they, as a whole-they're graduating four times as many engineers as we are, and that's just happened over the last 20 years.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Wolfgang Pauli

For quite a while I have set for myself the rule if a theoretician says 'universal' it just means pure nonsense.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Marie Curie

For the admirable gift of himself, and for the magnificent service he renders humanity, what reward does our society offer the scientist? Have these servants of an idea the necessary means of work? Have they an assured existence, sheltered from care? The example of Pierre Curiee, and of others, shows that they have none of these things; and that more often, before they can secure possible working conditions, they have to exhaust their youth and their powers in daily anxieties. Our society, in which reigns an eager desire for riches and luxury, does not understand the value of science. It does not realize that science is a most precious part of its moral patrimony. Nor does it take sufficient cognizance of the fact that science is at the base of all the progress that lightens the burden of life and lessens its suffering. Neither public powers nor private generosity actually accord to science and to scientists the support and the subsidies indispensable to fully effective work.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Giovanni Arduino

I have always loved to begin with the facts, to observe them, to walk in the light of experiment and demonstrate as much as possible, and to discuss the results.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Wilhelm Reich

It is of the essence of any party to gain its orientation not from truths but from illusions which usually correspond to the irrational mass structure. Scientific truths only interfered with the habit of the party politicians of avoiding difficulties with the aid of illusions.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Yann Rousselot

My love for Neo-Tokyo is a bulbous mass of post-human organic circuitry. Cyperpunk is my mother tongue. My love is a man-machine interface gun.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Johannes Kepler

Eyesight should learn from reason.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Doris Lessing

What of course I would like to be writing is the story of the Red and White Dwarves and their Remembering Mirror, their space rocket (powered by anti-gravity), their attendant entities Hadron, Gluon, Pion, Lepton, and Muon, and the Charmed Quarks and the Coloured Quarks. But we can't all be physicists.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Richard Dawkins

People who believe the earth was created 6000 years ago, when it's actually 4.5 billion years old, should also believe the width of North America is 8 yards. That is the scale of the error.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kent Beck

Brilliance in a scientist does not consist in being right more often but in being wrong about more interesting topics.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bacharuddin Jusuf Habibie

Based on the experience of history and civilization of mankind, which is more important for Muslims today, to no longer busy discussing the greatness that Muslims achieved in the past, or debating who first discovered the number zero, including the number one, two, three and so on, as the contribution of Muslims in the writing of numbers in this modern era and the foundation and development of civilizations throughout the world. But how Muslims will regained the lead and control of science and technology, leading back and become a leader in the world of science and civilization, because it represents a real achievement.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Nicholas Gane

... Protestantism, in its quest for 'rational knowledge' of God's purpose and for an understanding of this world, engendered its own demise, for it lent legitimacy to a secular science that in turn rejected and devalued all religious values. And in this respect, Protestantism effectively devalued or disenchanted itself, for in its attempt to prove its own intrinsic rationality through non-religious means it affirmed the value of science, and with this laid itself open to the charge of irrationalism and to attack from the outside from 'rational', secular forms of this-worldly legitimation.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Thomas Young

But it will be found... that one universal law prevails in all these phenomena. Where two portions of the same light arrive in the eye by different routes, either exactly or very nearly in the same direction, the appearance or disappearance of various colours is determined by the greater or less difference in the lengths of the paths.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Farooq A. Shiekh

....All of the medicine hurts.

By Anonym 13 Sep

C. P. Snow

For the first time I saw a medley of haphazard facts fall into line and order. All the jumbles and recipes and hotchpotch of the inorganic chemistry of my boyhood seemed to fit into the scheme before my eyes-as though one were standing beside a jungle and it suddenly transformed itself into a Dutch garden.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Niels Henrik Abel

He is like the fox, who effaces his tracks in the sand with his tail. {Describing the writing style of famous mathematician Carl Friedrich Gauss}

By Anonym 15 Sep

E. H. Moore

We lay down a fundamental principle of generalization by abstraction: The existence of analogies between central features of various theories implies the existence of a general theory which underlies the particular theories and unifies them with respect to those central features.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Shimon Peres

The foes now are universal - poverty, famine, religious radicalization, desertification, drugs, proliferation of nuclear weapons, ecological devastation. They threaten all nations, just as science and information are the potential friends of all nations. Classical diplomacy and strategy were aimed at identifying enemies and confronting them. Now they have to identify dangers, global or local, and tackle them before they become disasters.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Max Von Laue

With crystals we are in a situation similar to an attempt to investigate an optical grating merely from the spectra it produces... But a knowledge of the positions and intensities of the spectra does not suffice for the determination of the structure. The phases with which the diffracted waves vibrate relative to one another enter in an essential way. To determine a crystal structure on the atomic scale, one must know the phase differences between the different interference spots on the photographic plate, and this task may certainly prove to be rather difficult.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Marie Francois Xavier Bichat

Medicine is an incoherent assemblage of incoherent ideas, and is, perhaps, of all the physiological Sciences, that which best shows the caprice of the human mind. What did I say! It is not a Science for a methodical mind. It is a shapeless assemblage of inaccurate ideas, of observations often puerile, of deceptive remedies, and of formulae as fantastically conceived as they are tediously arranged.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Duane T. Gish

Now, evolution is the substance of fossils hoped for, the evidence of links not seen.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Alfred Bernhard Nobel

The capital ... shall form a fund, the interest of which shall be distributed annually as prizes to those persons who shall have rendered humanity the best services during the past year. ... One-fifth to the person having made the most important discovery or invention in the science of physics, one-fifth to the person who has made the most eminent discovery or improvement in chemistry, one-fifth to the one having made the most important discovery with regard to physiology or medicine, one-fifth to the person who has produced the most distinguished idealistic work of literature, and one-fifth to the person who has worked the most or best for advancing the fraternization of all nations and for abolishing or diminishing the standing armies as well as for the forming or propagation of committees of peace.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Joseph Leconte

There is nothing which Nature so clearly reveals, and upon which science so strongly insists, as the universal reign of law, absolute, universal, invariable law... Not one jot or tittle of the laws of Nature are unfulfilled. I do not believe it is possible to state this fact too strongly... Everything happens according to law, and, since law is the expression of Divine will, everything happens according to Divine will, i.e. is in some sense ordained, decreed.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Richard Dawkins

Science is the poetry of reality.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Xenophanes

For we are all sprung from earth and water

By Anonym 13 Sep

Francis Bacon

But the best demonstration by far is experience, if it go not beyond the actual experiment.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Lailah Gifty Akita

My pursuit of science turns into a passion for spirituality.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kim Stanley Robinson

Statistically it was not greatly different than it had been for previous generations, but anecdotally it had become so prominent that every problem was noticed and remarked. The cognitive error called ease of representation thrust them into a space where every problem they witnessed convinced them they were in an unprecedented colapse. They were getting depressed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Sydney Smith

[T]he 47th proposition in Euclid might now be voted down with as much ease as any proposition in politics; and therefore if Lord Hawkesbury hates the abstract truths of science as much as he hates concrete truth in human affairs, now is his time for getting rid of the multiplication table, and passing a vote of censure upon the pretensions of the hypotenuse.

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Armstrong

For want of timely care Millions have died of medicable wounds.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Hans Kramers

In the world of human thought generally, and in physical science particularly, the most important and fruitful concepts are those to which it is impossible to attach a well-defined meaning.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jacob Bronowski

When Da Vinci wanted an effect, he willed, he planned the means to make it happen: that was the purpose of his machines. But the machines of Newton ... are means not for doing but for observing. He saw an effect, and he looked for its cause.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Noah Porter

Science has penetrated the constitution of nature, and unrolled the mysterious pages of its history, and started again many, as yet, unanswered questions in respect to the mutual relations of matter and spirit, of nature and of God.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Alexandre Koyre

What the founders of modern science ... had to do, was not criticize and to combat certain faulty theories, and to correct or to replace them by better ones. They had to do something quite different. They had to destroy one world and replace it by another. They had to reshape the framework of our intellect itself, to restate and to reform its concepts, to evolve a new approach to Being, a new concept of knowledge, and a new concept of science - and even to replace a pretty natural approach, that of common sense, by another which is not natural at all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Augustus De Morgan

During the last two centuries and a half, physical knowledge has been gradually made to rest upon a basis which it had not before. It has become mathematical. The question now is, not whether this or that hypothesis is better or worse to the pure thought, but whether it accords with observed phenomena in those consequences which can be shown necessarily to follow from it, if it be true

By Anonym 13 Sep

Gregory Chaitin

But if we play it safe, the problem is that we may be losing out, and I believe we are.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Thomas Sowell

Most variables can show either an upward or downward trend, depending on the base year chosen.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Adam Sedgwick

[Vestiges begins] from principles which are at variance with all sober inductive truth. The sober facts of geology shuffled, so as to play a rogue's game; phrenology (that sinkhole of human folly and prating coxcombry); spontaneous generation; transmutation of species; and I know not what; all to be swallowed, without tasting and trying, like so much horse-physic!! Gross credulity and rank infidelity joined in unlawful marriage, and breeding a deformed progeny of unnatural conclusions!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Paul Dirac

Well, in the first place, it leads to great anxiety as to whether it's going to be correct or not ... I expect that's the dominating feeling. It gets to be rather a fever... At age 60, when asked about his feelings on discovering the Dirac equation.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dick Swaab

As a boy, Picasso struggled with reading, writing, and arithmetic. Einstein was slow to talk and would apply picture thinking to complex problems in the field of physics. The dividing line between psychiatric disorders and great gifts is often a very narrow one and strongly depends on how someone is viewed by their surroundings.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Mustafa Kemal Ataturk

The biggest battle is the war against ignorance.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Michel De Montaigne

Reason has so many forms that we do not know which to choose-Experiment has no fewer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Georges-louis Leclerc

As historians, we refuse to allow ourselves these vain speculations which turn on possibilities that, in order to be reduced to actuality, suppose an overturning of the Universe, in which our globe, like a speck of abandoned matter, escapes our vision and is no longer an object worthy of our regard. In order to fix our vision, it is necessary to take it such as it is, to observe well all parts of it, and by indications infer from the present to the past.