Best 9 724 of Science quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 15 Sep

Tim Berners-lee

[The internet] ought to be like clay, rather than a sculpture that you observe from a distance.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Bronislaw Malinowski

The magnificent title of the Functional School of Anthropology has been bestowed on myself, in a way on myself, and to a large extent out of my own sense of irresponsibility.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kambiz Shabankareh

Good heart does not produce science or even art, but knowledge does, intellect does and absolutely expertise does.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ken Hollings

These were the kids who would take LSD for recreational purposes, who relied upon tape recorders to supply the weird studio effects their music required and who could repeat the cosmic wisdom of the Space Brothers as if it were the Pledge of Allegiance. Brought up on space heroes and super beings, as revealed to them in comic books and TV shows, the whole galaxy was their birthright, just as Mad magazine and cheap B-movies had shown them hows stupid and flimsy a construct daily life could be. To the subtle dismay of their parents, this was a generation capable of thinking the unthinkable as a matter of course. That their grand cosmological adventure should come to an end just as Neil Armstrong succeeded in bringing Suburbia to the Moon is another story and it will have to wait for another time.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Wilfred Trotter

The mind likes a strange idea as little as the body likes a strange protein and resists it with similar energy. It would not perhaps be too fanciful to say that a new idea is the most quickly acting antigen known to science. If we watch ourselves honestly we shall often find that we have begun to argue against a new idea even before it has been completely stated.

By Anonym 13 Sep

George Wald

A scientist lives with all reality. There is nothing better. To know reality is to accept it, and eventually to love it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ernest Thompson Seton

The life of a wild animal always has a tragic end.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Johannes Kepler

If there is anything that can bind the mind of man to this dreary exile of our earthly home and can reconcile us with our fate so that one can enjoy living,—then it is verily the enjoyment of the mathematical sciences and astronomy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jons Jacob Berzelius

Since it is necessary for specific ideas to have definite and consequently as far as possible selected terms, I have proposed to call substances of similar composition and dissimilar properties isomeric, from the Greek ίσομερης (composed of equal parts).

By Anonym 14 Sep

Thomas Carlyle

The graceful minuet-dance of fancy must give place to the toilsome, thorny pilgrimage of understanding. On the transition from the age of romance to that of science.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William King Gregory

As long as museums and universities send out expeditions to bring to light new forms of living and extinct animals and new data illustrating the interrelations of organisms and their environments, as long as anatomists desire a broad comparative basis human for anatomy, as long as even a few students feel a strong curiosity to learn about the course of evolution and relationships of animals, the old problems of taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution will gradually reassert themselves even in competition with brilliant and highly fruitful laboratory studies in cytology, genetics and physiological chemistry.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Warren E. Burger

[No one will be able to] deter the scientific mind from probing into the unknown any more than Canute could command the tides.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Jeremiah Bigsby

The enjoyments of elegant life you early chose to abandon, preferring to wander for many successive years over the rudest portions of Europe and Asia-regions new to Science-in the hope, happily realized, of winning new truths. By a rare union of favourable circumstances, and of personal qualifications equally rare, you have thus been enabled to become the recognized Interpreter and Historian (not without illustrious aid) of the Silurian Period.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Nicholas Gane

Lyotard develops and extends Weber's argument regarding the disenchantment of art to suggest the Western culture increasingly obeys an instrumental logic of performance and control, one that imposes order on the free play of the imagination and subordinates creative thought to the demands of the capitalist market. And, for Lyotard, the effects of this process are consistent with those outlined in Weber's work, namely the progressive elimination of ritual or religious forms of art, the restriction of creative forms by an instrumental (capitalist) rationality, and with this the denigration of value-rational artistic practice.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hasse Jerner

Being ninety nine percent sure opens for a possibility that you might be a hundred percent wrong.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. E. B. Du Bois

When you have mastered numbers, you will in fact no longer be reading numbers, any more than you read words when reading books You will be reading meanings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

C. P. Snow

For the first time I saw a medley of haphazard facts fall into line and order. All the jumbles and recipes and hotchpotch of the inorganic chemistry of my boyhood seemed to fit into the scheme before my eyes-as though one were standing beside a jungle and it suddenly transformed itself into a Dutch garden.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Brian Greene

Physicists are more like avant-garde composers, willing to bend traditional rules... Mathematicians are more like classical composers.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Suman Jyoty Bhante

The means and the results, the good and the bad, are within all of us who are aware and care.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Luis Marques

The night is Ours. Rejoicing in the ethereal realms where We are kings. Blessed souls of forgotten immortality. They fear Us in every grasp.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kyle Broflovski

Caitlyn Jenner is not brave nor a hero

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Lyell

Geology differs as widely from cosmogony, as speculations concerning the creation of man differ from history.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Gertrude B. Elion

I had no specific bent toward science until my grandfather died of stomach cancer. I decided that nobody should suffer that much.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William James

I wished by treating Psychology like a natural science, to help her become one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Justus Von Liebig

What struck me most in England was the perception that only those works which have a practical tendency awake attention and command respect, while the purely scientific, which possess far greater merit are almost unknown. And yet the latter are the proper source from which the others flow. Practice alone can never lead to the discovery of a truth or a principle. In Germany it is quite the contrary. Here in the eyes of scientific men no value, or at least but a trifling one, is placed upon the practical results. The enrichment of science is alone considered worthy attention.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Linus Pauling

The McCarthy period came along...and many of the other scientists who had been working on these same lines gave up. Probably saying "Why should I sacrifice myself? I am a scientist, I am supposed to be working on scientific things, so I don't need to put myself at risk by talking about these possibilities." And I have said that perhaps I'm just stubborn... I have said "I don't like anybody to tell me what to do or to think, except Mrs. Pauling.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Francis Bacon

They are the best physicians, who being great in learning most incline to the traditions of experience, or being distinguished in practice do not reflect the methods and generalities of art.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jennifer Tour Chayes

With a metric you can really go to town, otherwise it is just abstract nonsense.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Darwin

We may confidently come to the conclusion, that the forces which slowly and by little starts uplift continents, and that those which at successive periods pour forth volcanic matter from open orifices, are identical.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Marc Aurel

Niemand wird müde, seinen Nutzen zu suchen; Nutzen aber gewährt eine naturgemäße Tätigkeit. Werde also nicht müde, deinen Nutzen zu suchen, indem du anderen Nutzen gewährst!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Marie Curie

I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. We should not allow it to be believed that all scientific progress can be reduced to mechanisms, machines, gearings, even though such machinery has its own beauty.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Jeans

We have already considered with disfavour the possibility of the universe having been planned by a biologist or an engineer; from the intrinsic evidence of his creation, the Great Architect of the Universe now begins to appear as a pure mathematician.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Dante Alighieri

As, pricked out with less and greater lights, between the poles of the universe, the Milky Way so gleameth white as to set very sages questioning.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Annonymous

You are who you are because others say that's who you are. You can try to change who you are but it will only change the views of others who think you are what you really aren't.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Leavitt

'You might think of combinatorics as a machine too', the major says. 'A different sort of machine, though. Have you heard of Babbage's analytic engine? He never built it. ... I have an analytic machine of my own-right here.' He taps his own skull.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Adolphe Wurtz

Both died, ignored by most; they neither sought nor found public favour, for high roads never lead there. Laurent and Gerhardt never left such roads, were never tempted to peruse those easy successes which, for strongly marked characters, offer neither allure nor gain. Their passion was for the search for truth; and, preferring their independence to their advancement, their convictions to their interests, they placed their love for science above that of their worldly goods; indeed above that for life itself, for death was the reward for their pains. Rare example of abnegation, sublime poverty that deserves the name nobility, glorious death that France must not forget!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Fritjof Capra

Quantum theory thus reveals a basic oneness of the universe. It shows that we cannot decompose the world into independently existing smallest units. As we penetrate into matter, nature does not show us any isolated "building blocks," but rather appears as a complicated web of relations between the various parts of the whole. These relations always include the observer in an essential way. The human observer constitute the final link in the chain of observational processes, and the properties of any atomic object can be understood only in terms of the object's interaction with the observer.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Andy Harglesis

The mind is the most powerful sense.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henri Poincare

What is a good definition? For the philosopher or the scientist, it is a definition which applies to all the objects to be defined, and applies only to them; it is that which satisfies the rules of logic. But in education it is not that; it is one that can be understood by the pupils.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William J. Clinton

When Galileo discovered he could use the tools of mathematics and mechanics to understand the motion of celestial bodies, he felt, in the words of one imminent researcher, that he had learned the language in which God recreated the universe. Today we are learning the language in which God created life. We are gaining ever more awe for the complexity, the beauty, the wonder of God's most devine and sacred gift.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Noam Chomsky

In rational inquiry, we idealize to selected domains in such a way (we hope) as to permit us to discover crucial features of the world. Data and observations, in the sciences, have an instrumental character. They are of no particular interest in themselves, but only insofar as they constitute evidence that permits one to determine fundamental features of the real world, within a course of inquiry that is invariably undertaken under sharp idealizations, often implicit and simply common understanding, but always present.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Scott Adams

Computers and rocket ships are examples of invention, not of understanding. ... All that is needed to build machines is the knowledge that when one thing happens, another thing happens as a result. It's an accumulation of simple patterns. A dog can learn patterns. There is no "why&rdqo"; in those examples. We don't understand why electricity travels. We don't know why light travels at a constant speed forever. All we can do is observe and record patterns.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Norman Klein

...first, in order to remember, something must be forgotten; second, the place where memories are stored has no boundaries. In other words, forgetting is a twin; its tandem effect is best called "simultancous" distraction, the instant when one memory defoliates another. This fuzzy double - one devouring the other - presumably inhibits learning

By Anonym 13 Sep

John Herschel

Almost all the greatest discoveries in astronomy have resulted from what we have elsewhere termed Residual Phenomena, of a qualitative or numerical kind, of such portions of the numerical or quantitative results of observation as remain outstanding and unaccounted for, after subducting and allowing for all that would result from the strict application of known principles.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Criss Jami

Our big mistake in modern intellectualism is first and foremost its lack of nuance. We have made science synonymous with atheism - a presupposed conception and yet, another means to non sequiturs - and therefore, to a number of enthusiasts determined to go the further, anti-theism. Hereby let us observe that science has long served best and should be, if none other, the one discipline, if at all possible, free of potential ideology, pro-religious or anti-religious, and/or biased presupposition in order to maintain the true authenticity and the full reliability of its nature.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

The Self is the measure of everything.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Joshua Reynolds

Genius is supposed to be a power of producing excellences which are put of the reach of the rules of art: a power which no precepts can teach, and which no industry can acquire.

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Stuart Mill

The ends of scientific classification are best answered, when the objects are formed into groups respecting which a greater number of general propositions can be made, and those propositions more important, than could be made respecting any other groups into which the same things could be distributed. ... A classification thus formed is properly scientific or philosophical, and is commonly called a Natural, in contradistinction to a Technical or Artificial, classification or arrangement.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Sean Carroll

Where misunderstanding dwells, misuse will not be far behind. No theory in the history of science has been more misused and abused by cranks and charlatans—and misunderstood by people struggling in good faith with difficult ideas—than quantum mechanics.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

O amazement of things-even the least particle!