Best 23 of Usmc quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chesty Puller

So they've got us surrounded, good! Now we can fire in any direction, those b*****ds won't get away this time!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Phil Hartman

Marines die, that's what we're here for. But the Marine Corps lives forever. And that means YOU live forever.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Dixon Porter

A ship without Marines is like a garment without buttons.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sandi Layne

Then, as now, it was just uncomfortable. Now, as then, it was a lifted chin and a crooked smile that said more than they would ever allow themselves to communicate.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Bradley

It would be forty-four years before physicist Donald Olson would discover that D-Day at Tarawa occurred during one of only two days in 1943 when the moon's apogee coincided with a neap tide, resulting in a tidal range of only a few inches rather than several feet. The actions of these Marines trapped on the reef would determine the outcome of the battle for Tarawa. If they hesitated or turned back, their buddies ashore would be decimated. But they didn't hesitate. They were Marines. They jumped from their stranded landing crafts into chest-deep water holding their arms and ammunition above their heads. In one of the bravest scenes in the history of warfare, these Marines slogged through the deep water into sheets of machine-gun bullets. There was nowhere to hide, as Japanese gunners raked the Marines at will. And the Marines, almost wholly submerged and their hands full of equipment, could not defend themselves. But they kept coming. Bullets ripped through their ranks, sending flesh and blood flying as screams pierced the air. Japanese steel killed over 300 Marines in those long minutes as they struggled to the shore. As the survivors stumbled breathlessly onto shore their boots splashed in water that had turned bright red with blood. This type of determination and valor among individual Marines overcame seemingly hopeless odds, and in three days of hellish fighting Tarawa was captured. The Marines suffered a shocking 4,400 casualties in just seventy-two hours of fighting as they wiped out the entire Japanese garrison of 5,000.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Bradley

December 1944. The last Christmas for too many young boys. Then off for the forty-day sail to Iwo Jima. The boys of Spearhead had been expertly trained for ten months. They were proficient in the techniques of war. But more important, they were a team, ready to fight for one another. These boys were bonded by feelings stronger than they would have for any other humans in their life. The vast, specialized city of men — boys, really, but a functioning society of experts now, trained and coordinated and interdependent and ready for its mission — will move out upon the Pacific. Behind them, in safe America, Bing Crosby sang of a white Christmas, just like the ones he used to know. Ahead lay a hot island of black sand, where many of them would ensure a long future of Christmases in America by laying down their lives.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Bradley

... [Howlin' Mad] Smith was the "Patton of the Pacific.

By Anonym 20 Sep

C. S. Forester

Yet if he had been asked… if he were happy… He would have admitted readily enough that he was uncomfortable, that he was cold, and badly fed, and venomous; that his clothes were in rags, and his feet and knees and elbows raw and bleeding through much walking and crawling; that he was in ever-present peril of life, and that he really did not expect to survive the adventure he was about to thrust himself into voluntarily, but all this had nothing to do with happiness: that was something he never stopped to think about.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Gysgt Charles C. Arndt

Take your time. Stay away from the easy going. Never take the same way twice. Gunny Arndt's rules for successful reconnaissance; Guadalcanal 1942

By Anonym 16 Sep

C. G. Faulkner

He set down the coffee and placed another log for splitting. Another biting cold wind blew through the trees, and he pulled his red stocking cap down more over his ears, and pulled up the collar of his wool-lined denim jacket. He had neglected to shave for a few weeks now, and was sporting a beard; and his light brown hair was even beginning to grow over his collar. If my old drill instructor from Parris Island could see me now, he’d kick my ass across the barracks, Jeff mused.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sandi Layne

...he couldn't help but wonder what Hannah might have looked like if...he'd answered that question April had asked him years ago.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jason Medina

We are trained fighting machines. Peace is not an option for us. We’re jarheads. What the hell do we know about peace?

By Anonym 13 Sep

George F. Kennan

Heroism is endurance for one moment more.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Bradley

... the island had to be taken at almost any cost.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Bradley

The Army Air Force was doing its part to soften up Iwo Jima for the Marines. Beginning December 8, B-29 Superforts and B-24 Liberators had been pummeling the island mercilessly. Iwo Jima would be bombed for seventy-two consecutive days, setting the record as the most heavily bombed target and the longest sustained bombardment in the Pacific War. One flyboy on Saipan confidently told Easy Company's Chuck Lindberg, "All you guys will have to do is clean up. No one could survive what we've been dropping.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stanley Kubrick

The purpose of bayonet training is to awaken your killer instincts. The killer instinct will make you strong. If the meek ever inherit the earth the strong will take it away from them. The weak exist to be devoured by the strong. Every Marine must pack his own gear. Every Marine must be the instrument of his own salvation.

By Anonym 19 Sep

James Bradley

Unlike all the other combatants in World War II, including the U.S. Army, Smith and his Marines never lost a battle.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Bradley

For most of the young boys, it had not fully sunk in yet that the defenders were not on Iwo, they were in Iwo, prowling the sixteen miles of catacombs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Chesty Puller

Old breed? New breed? There's not a damn bit of difference so long as it's the Marine breed.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Bradley

Some optimistically hoped the unprecedented bombing of the tiny island would make the conquest of Iwo Jima a two- to three-day job. But on the command ship USS Eldorado, Howlin' Mad shared none of this optimism. The general was studying reconnaissance photographs that showed every square inch of the island had been bombed. "The Seventh Air Force dropped 5,800 tons in 2,700 sorties. In one square mile of Iwo Jima, a photograph showed 5,000 bomb craters." Admiral Nimitz thought he was dropping bombs "sufficient to pulverize everything on the island." But incredibly, the enemy defenses were growing. There were 450 major defensive installations when the bombing began. Now there were over 750. Howlin' Mad observed: "We thought it would blast any island off the military map, level every defense, no matter how strong, and wipe out the garrison. But nothing of the kind happened. Like the worm, which becomes stronger the more you cut it up, Iwo Jima thrived on our bombardment.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Nathaniel Fick

Great Marine commanders, like all great warriors, are able to kill that which they love most -- their men.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michael Martinez

It takes thousands of bullets to kill an army but one to end a war.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Richard Harding Davis

The Marines have landed and the situation is well in hand.