Best 1 039 of Mental health quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jazalyn

I fell in love with you When I was mourning for another love And it was as if I found a lifeline

By Anonym 19 Sep

R. Ys Perez

This is how you explain how you feel: broken words and hard truths.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Jazalyn

When I came to you A butterfly came too And feelings started anew... ...Do you remember it? But most of all: Do you believe in signs?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Alessandra Hazard

There’s no such thing as normal. There is no definition of normal. Normal is subjective. You can’t—and shouldn’t—force yourself to want something ‘normal’ and stop wanting what you truly want. It’s a sure way to make your life miserable.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rani Bora

Everyone has an innate capacity to bounce back from setbacks, reconnect with their passion for work, do their best and thrive no matter how dire external circumstances may seem.

By Anonym 16 Sep

L. M. Browning

In lieu of letting go of our trauma and rather than healing completely, in my experience, we learn how to carry it and there are some days when it is heavier than others. Some days, I hardly know it is there, distracted as I am by present joys and excitement; while other days, the burden is cripplingly-heavy and I can hardly breathe under the weight of grief.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Nathaniel Branden

Self-discipline is the ability to organize your behavior over time in the service of specific goals.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Cheryl Hersha

Cheryl was aided in her search by the Internet. Each time she remembered a name that seemed to be important in her life, she tried to look up that person on the World Wide Web. The names and pictures Cheryl found were at once familiar and yet not part of her conscious memory: Dr. Sidney Gottlieb, Dr. Louis 'Jolly' West, Dr. Ewen Cameron, Dr. Martin Orne and others had information by and about them on the Web. Soon, she began looking up sites related to childhood incest and found that some of the survivor sites mentioned the same names, though in the context of experiments performed on small children. Again, some names were familiar. Then Cheryl began remembering what turned out to be triggers from old programmes. 'The song, "The Green, Green Grass of home" kept running through my mind. I remembered that my father sang it as well. It all made no sense until I remembered that the last line of the song tells of being buried six feet under that green, green grass. Suddenly, it came to me that this was a suicide programme of the government. 'I went crazy. I felt that my body would explode unless I released some of the pressure I felt within, so I grabbed a [pair ofl scissors and cut myself with the blade so I bled. In my distracted state, I was certain that the bleeding would let the pressure out. I didn't know Lynn had felt the same way years earlier. I just knew I had to do it Cheryl says. She had some barbiturates and other medicine in the house. 'One particularly despondent night, I took several pills. It wasn't exactly a suicide try, though the pills could have killed me. Instead, I kept thinking that I would give myself a fifty-fifty chance of waking up the next morning. Maybe the pills would kill me. Maybe the dose would not be lethal. It was all up to God. I began taking pills each night. Each-morning I kept awakening.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Lauren Miller

The fear, though, is unassailable. The dark balls of dread pinball through my brain. This is what anxiety does to a brain, I know that. A barrage of intrusive, unwanted, and distressing thoughts that the person thinking them can't turn them off no matter how hard they try...

By Anonym 18 Sep

Eda J. Vor

Some people just live out their whole lives with some sort of ache in their heart they never resolve.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Stefanie Sybens

How could two people who were so lost be so complete together?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

If your mental health is sound, then when disturbances come, you will have some distress but quickly recover.

By Anonym 17 Sep

David Adam

Mind over matter represents the triumph of will over physical hindrance. Our thoughts are our weapon against the world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Allan Dare Pearce

They'll want to kill the crazies first. Big fish eat little fish -- always have, always will.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Stephen King

In spite of it all I didn't want to die.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jessica Moore

Emotions influence every action we take. So the more we are aware of our feelings, the more we gain conscious control over our lives.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Amy Leigh Mercree

Meditation is a practice that fosters mental stamina, perseverance, and the ability to openly receive.

By Anonym 19 Sep

S. R. Crawford

What is the date? What is the time? … Great, that’s what Now is. And every second, your ‘Now’ changes. Because all we have is Now. We are continuously living in the Now. Not yesterday, not tomorrow, but Now. Today. The present. And I need you to live in it. To truly appreciate it. To breathe and feel yourself breathing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robert Uttaro

An engaging examination of a painful subject, with a focus on healing and forgiveness. - Kirkus Review

By Anonym 17 Sep

Maria Karvouni

Mental health sufferers are not crazy. They have special insight. You better recognize that setting aside your interest people to stay asleep and show empathy towards God's imperfect creations, otherwise the world has no meaning to exist.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Nadia L. King

Tracing the pattern of the blanket with my fingertips, I decide to give myself another chance. I think I'm going to be kinder to myself; more accepting. I need to learn to live my life my way.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Elizabeth Esther

We were taught to share at the expense of our own well-being. We came to associate self-care and self-love with selfishness.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Joan Frances Casey

Now that she had the diagnosis to explain her sense of reality, she sorted some of the chaotic jumble of thoughts and memories. "I'd feel funny having 'daydreamed' my way through whole seasons," Jo said, "but then I'd hear someone say, 'Time flies,' or 'How did it get to be three o'clock already?' and I'd think that everyone was like me.

By Anonym 18 Sep

David Tyler

The grace of God is cherished most by those who realize their sinfulness most.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Frank Sonnenberg

Is stress inflicted on you — or created by you?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Malebo Sephodi

Thinking - thinking real hard. My grandmother knew when I was down. She knew what to do She would encourage me to engage in "self-care" and would do all manner of therapeutic things for me Sometimes, our ForeMothers knew how to spot mental illness and help us! She would mix some oils and ask me to breathe in and out... or boil some herbs and ask me to bask in the steam She would send me to work in the field - because the closer we are to the EARTH the grounded we become She would sing for me - and then pray

By Anonym 15 Sep

Neal Shusterman

Centering, however, is easier said than done. This I learned from a ceramics class I once took. The teacher made throwing a pot look easy, but the thing is, it takes lots of precision and skill. You slam the ball of clay down in the absolute center of the pottery wheel, and with steady hands you push your thumb into the middle of it, spreading it wider a fraction of an inch at a time. But every single time I tried to do it, I only got so far before my pot warped out of balance, and every attempt to fix it just made it worse, until the lip shredded, the sides collapsed, and I was left with what the teacher called “a mystery ashtray,” which got hurled back into the clay bucket. So what happens when your universe begins to get off balance, and you don’t have any experience with bringing it back to center? All you can do is fight a losing battle, waiting for those walls to collapse, and your life to become one huge mystery ashtray.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Okisha Jackson

Mental health isn’t all about mental illness; however, if we don’t manage our mental health our issues can take an ugly turn into mental illness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Theresa Larsen

Progression and regression go hand in hand with mental health. It is a tough illness. You often take one step forward and ten steps back.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kathryn Perez

Regret is a painful thing. Few people understand that there are three important things that leave us and can never return. Words. Time. Opportunity. These are things we can never get back.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Stefanie Sybens

I didn't want to be in a relationship that required me to erase parts of who I was

By Anonym 19 Sep

Juliette Cross

There are few things in this world that truly make us content. There’s a difference between happy and content, did ya know?" I shook my head, having never given the idea much thought. "Happy is what you are when you buy yourself a new hat, when you look on something grand for the first time, when a lad surprises his girl with roses. But content is different entirely. A content person feels that all is right with the world even when tragedy strikes, even when loss weighs the spirit down. They’re still at ease within themselves no matter what calamity breaks their heart. Do you see? " I did. I nodded, though I wasn’t quite sure where all this was going. "Just so, a person can be depressed or sad. The depressed person feels the blow of some misfortune---loss of a job, a pet dies, a car accident. With time depression goes away. But the sad one..." He shakes his head leveling his gaze on me. "The sad one allows misfortune to darken the spirit, to smother any hope left inside. The sad one doesn’t live long." "What do you mean? You can’t die from sadness." "Even if the body’s breathin’, that don’t mean you’re livin’, lass.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Alice Jamieson

Some alters are what Dr Ross describes in Multiple Personality Disorder as 'fragments', which are 'relatively limited psychic states that express only one feeling, hold one memory or carry out a limited task in the person's life. A fragment might be a frightened child who holds the memory of one particular abuse incident.' In complex multiples, Dr Ross continues, the `personalities are relatively full-bodied, complete states capable of a rang of emotions and behaviours.' The alters will have `executive control some substantial amount of time over the person life'. He stresses, and I repeat his emphasis, 'Complex MPD with over 15 alter personalities and complicated amnesic barriers are associated with 100 percent frequency of childhood physical, sexual and emotional abuse.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Alice Jamieson

It is hard to bring paedophile rings to justice. Thankfully it does happen. Perhaps the most horrific recent case came before the High Court in Edinburgh in June 2007. It involved a mother who stood by and watched as her daughter of nine was gang-raped by members of a paedophile ring at her home in Granton, in the north of Edinburgh. The mother, Caroline Dunsmore, had allowed her two daughters to be used in this way from the age of five. Sentencing Dunsmore to twelve years in prison judge, Lord Malcolm, said he would take into account public revulsion at the grievous crimes against the two girls. He told the forty-three-year-old woman: 'It is hard to imagine a more grievous breach of trust on the part of a mother towards her child.' Morris Petch and John O'Flaherty were also jailed for taking part in raping the children. Child abuse nearly always takes place at home and members of the family are usually involved.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sue Klebold

If the portrayal of Dylan as a monster left the impression that the tragedy at Columbine had no relevance to average people or their families, then whatever measure of comfort it offered was false. I hope the truth will awake people to a greater sense of vulnerability—more frightening, perhaps, but crucial—that cannot so easily be circumscribed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jessica Moore

Anger exists to move us into action, whenever action is needed to protect our boundaries, our sense of self, or whatever we consider to be “ours”.

By Anonym 17 Sep

David Adam

Officially, it is no more possible to be a little bit OCD than it is to be a little bit pregnant or a little bit dead.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Leslie Feinberg

As she climbed down from the stage, I thought: This is what courage is. It's not just living through the nightmare, it's doing something with it afterward. It's being brave enough to talk about it to other people. It's trying to organize to change things.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Nathaniel Branden

Genuine self esteem – please understand this – genuine self esteem is not competitive or comparative. Genuine self esteem isn’t expressed by self-glorification at the expense of others, or by trying to make yourself superior to everyone else, or diminishing others in order to elevate yourself. Arrogance, boastfulness, the overestimation of your abilities, reflect low self esteem, even though we’re often encouraged to believe the opposite. In human beings, joy in the simple fact of existence is a core meaning of healthy self esteem. Thus understood, how can you possibly have too much of it?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sonali Deraniyagala

the reality of being here eludes me, I can’t focus, I am dazed. And I want to stay this way. If I have too much clarity, I will be undone, I fear.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Alex Bosworth

Have you ever suddenly realized it's someone else's mood swing and you're just along for the ride?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Barry Lopez

I think of two landscapes- one outside the self, the other within. The external landscape is the one we see-not only the line and color of the land and its shading at different times of the day, but also its plants and animals in season, its weather, its geology… If you walk up, say, a dry arroyo in the Sonoran Desert you will feel a mounding and rolling of sand and silt beneath your foot that is distinctive. You will anticipate the crumbling of the sedimentary earth in the arroyo bank as your hand reaches out, and in that tangible evidence you will sense the history of water in the region. Perhaps a black-throated sparrow lands in a paloverde bush… the smell of the creosote bush….all elements of the land, and what I mean by “the landscape.” The second landscape I think of is an interior one, a kind of projection within a person of a part of the exterior landscape. Relationships in the exterior landscape include those that are named and discernible, such as the nitrogen cycle, or a vertical sequence of Ordovician limestone, and others that are uncodified or ineffable, such as winter light falling on a particular kind of granite, or the effect of humidity on the frequency of a blackpoll warbler’s burst of song….the shape and character of these relationships in a person’s thinking, I believe, are deeply influenced by where on this earth one goes, what one touches, the patterns one observes in nature- the intricate history of one’s life in the land, even a life in the city, where wind, the chirp of birds, the line of a falling leaf, are known. These thoughts are arranged, further, according to the thread of one’s moral, intellectual, and spiritual development. The interior landscape responds to the character and subtlety of an exterior landscape; the shape of the individual mind is affected by land as it is by genes. Among the Navajo, the land is thought to exhibit sacred order…each individual undertakes to order his interior landscape according to the exterior landscape. To succeed in this means to achieve a balanced state of mental health…Among the various sung ceremonies of this people-Enemyway, Coyoteway, Uglyway- there is one called Beautyway. It is, in part, a spiritual invocation of the order of the exterior universe, that irreducible, holy complexity that manifests itself as all things changing through time (a Navajo definition of beauty).

By Anonym 17 Sep

Linde Zingaro

One of the main problems for anyone working in health care, social work or addiction treatment is the struggle to hold on to some version of a safe world for ourselves when we are seeing the evidence and hearing the stories of trauma that offer other important and disturbing information: that the world, for very many people, is not a safe place.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Gail Saltz

It's unfortunate and worth noting that the same word we use to describe [pathological anxiety], we also use to describe our feelings about a high-pressure day at the office. The word 'anxiety', in all of its derivations, is among the most overused in the English language.

By Anonym 18 Sep

C. G. Jung

That we are bound to the earth does not mean that we cannot grow; on the contrary it is the sine qua non of growth. No noble, well-grown tree ever disowned its dark roots, for it grows not only upward but downward as well.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Foster Wallace

a manual for how to build a mentally ill child

By Anonym 15 Sep

Judith Lewis Herman

Admitting the need for help may also compound the survivor's sense of defeat. The therapists Inger Agger and Soren Jensen, who work with political refugees, describe the case of K, a torture survivor with severe post-traumatic symptoms who adamantly insisted that he had no psychological problems: "K...did not understand why he was to talk with a therapist. His problems were medical: the reason why he did not sleep at night was due to the pain in his legs and feet. He was asked by the therapist...about his political background, and K told him that he was a Marxist and that he had read about Freud and he did not believe in any of that stuff: how could his pain go away by talking to a therapist?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jessica Moore

The quickest way to end up feeling anger all the time is to repress it and fight against it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Emily Austin

I have to share a room. I am expected to sleep mere meters from a woman whose mental ailment is unknown to me. For all I know she might be a cannibal.

By Anonym 19 Sep

R. D. Laing

Under the heading of "defense mechanisms,” psychoanalysis describes a number of ways in which a person becomes alienated from himself. For example, repression, denial, splitting, projection, introjection. These "mechanisms" are often described in psychoanalytic terms as themselves "unconscious,” that is, the person himself appears to be unaware that he is doing this to himself. Even when a person develops sufficient insight to see that "splitting", for example, is going on, he usually experiences this splitting as indeed a mechanism, an impersonal process, so to speak, which has taken over and which he can observe but cannot control or stop. There is thus some phenomenological validity in referring to such "defenses" by the term "mechanism.” But we must not stop there. They have this mechanical quality because the person as he experiences himself is dissociated from them. He appears to himself and to others to suffer from them. They seem to be processes he undergoes, and as such he experiences himself as a patient, with a particular psychopathology. But this is so only from the perspective of his own alienated experience. As he becomes de-alienated he is able first of all to become aware of them, if he has not already done so, and then to take the second, even more crucial, step of progressively realizing that these are things he does or has done to himself. Process becomes converted back to praxis, the patient becomes an agent.