Best 1 039 of Mental health quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 20 Sep

Francisco X. Stork

You shouldn't talk to people about the future if you don't believe in one for yourself.

By Anonym 18 Sep

A. N. Turner

Social norms have changed. New technologies—the cotton gin, the automobile, the airplane—always alter human civilization, and not always for the better. Yes, some of the more deleterious effects of the Internet will probably flatten out over time, but by then our youth, maybe even our lives, will have been squandered.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Roxane Gay

I was always a good girl. I was a straight-A student, top of my class. I did as I was told. I was polite to my elders. I was good to my siblings. I went to church. It was very easy to hide how very bad I was becoming from my family, from everyone. Being good is the best way to be bad.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Maggie Nelson

Like many self-help books, The Deepest Blue is full of horrifyingly simplistic language and some admittedly good advice. Somehow the women in the book learn to say: That’s my depression talking. It’s not “me.” As if we could scrape the color off the iris and still see.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Eric Lindstrom

Being in love with someone who doesn't love you back is a tragedy. A fantasy is having someone understand the real you and love you anyway.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Madeleine Kuderick

Vampire Diaries instead of Supernatural? (Bad choice.)

By Anonym 16 Sep

Robert Uttaro

I think I just said it, but I think it’s worth repeating. They gave me hope that there is good in the world out there. There really is. It really does exist. Regardless of how bad things can be, and how down on your luck you can be, or how bad your trust is broken when it comes to warming up to people and all that stuff, I know that there’s people out there that genuinely wanna help. Putting yourself in that position is a huge step, and it’s a very risky and fragile step, but it’s also a step that needs to be taken because there is help. And you can get through something like this. You really can. - Jim, from "To the Survivors

By Anonym 16 Sep

Shenita Etwaroo

It’s vitally important that mental health care services are considered a basic human right.” -Shenita Etwaroo

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

People with OCD including myself, realize that their seemingly uncontrollable behavior is irrational, but they feel unable to stop it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Brian Lindstrom

Mental health treatment is most likely available to the officers, but they may be reluctant to access it due to cultural beliefs within the force, fear of stigma, etc.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Bruce M. Carruthers

ME/CFS is not synonymous with depression or other psychiatric illnesses. The belief by some that they are the same has caused much con- fusion in the past, and inappropriate treatment. Nonpsychotic depression (major depression and dysthymia), anxiety disorders and somatization disorders are not diagnostically exclusionary, but may cause significant symptom overlap. Careful attention to the timing and correlation of symptoms, and a search for those characteristics of the symptoms that help to differentiate between diagnoses may be informative, e.g., exercise will tend to ameliorate depression whereas excessive exercise tends to have an adverse effect on ME/CFS patients.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Germany Kent

Don't live the same day over and over again and call that a life. Life is about evolving mentally, spiritually, and emotionally.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Celeste Ng

Anger is fear's bodygurad.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Jan Wong

…depressive realism. Depression is not the near death experience described by so many, [Kayla Dunn] suggests, but a rebirth in which the new psyche has removed self-delusion. Compared with so-called healthy individuals, depressives are more realistic in their worldview.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Stefanie Sybens

Maybe I had changed and everything around me started changing as well

By Anonym 15 Sep

Judith Lewis Herman

Admitting the need for help may also compound the survivor's sense of defeat. The therapists Inger Agger and Soren Jensen, who work with political refugees, describe the case of K, a torture survivor with severe post-traumatic symptoms who adamantly insisted that he had no psychological problems: "K...did not understand why he was to talk with a therapist. His problems were medical: the reason why he did not sleep at night was due to the pain in his legs and feet. He was asked by the therapist...about his political background, and K told him that he was a Marxist and that he had read about Freud and he did not believe in any of that stuff: how could his pain go away by talking to a therapist?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robin Sacredfire

Seeking for perfection is like seeking for mental health without a definition of what it is. But if psychology and psychiatry are as lost as the people they consistently evaluate, and people are as imperfect as the imperfection they see in others, then I have to conclude that it is as wise to accept judgment as it is to judge first the ones who judge us. But it is also as wise as it is foolish to do so; for it is like seeking for a definition that can’t entirely define us. Because if one answer can explain a thousand questions, a billion questions would never amount to the importance of an answer, which the simpler it is, the more questions it answers. And in that sense, I must say, we are imperfectly perfect.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Fisher

Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Colleen Hanabusa

Background checks, waiting periods, reports of transfers, and access to mental health records have not stopped the legal sale of firearms to legitimate buyers.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Martin Baker

No one is too far away to be cared for, or to care.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lynn Hersha

As Lynn began getting psychologically better, she took me to a variety of sites. She taught me how to read trail markers. In the end, Lynn's stories could not be denied. She was not only a victim, she wanted badly to heal. As her experiences were told and worked through, as she slowly began to come to grips with her past, the personalities within her have slowly begun to heal.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Anna Funder

People were crazy with pain and secrets.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stefanie Sybens

There was so much good stuff, and all I could feel was the bad

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jazalyn

I Am Crying For You ...The only thing That remains Is hope; I don’t want to lose you; I pray for a miracle That will unite us again I had a long time To cry And it took me By surprise That these days I am crying for you

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kabi Nagata

There are people who say that "when you reject one thing about me, I take it as a full rejection of me as a person".

By Anonym 14 Sep

E. Fuller Torrey

Over the years it [the National Committee for Mental Hygiene] has championed for the promotion of 'mental health' despite the fact that nobody knows what it is or how to do it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charlotte Eriksson

Everything changed when I learned to honour my body instead of fighting it. When I learned to take care of it, like a precious castle to protect this weary heart. To stop harming it, punishing it for looking like this or that, feeling like this or that. I don’t look like they all told me I had to, but I’m healthy and strong and vital. That is enough.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Mel Ingrid

It unwound like a coil of string in his chest and he could feel it spreading to his fingertips, the dryness of his bones, the warmth of his blood. For nearly a decade, no one knew how much it hurt to be him.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ron Powers

The future will be decided in a thousand American urban neighborhoods and suburban conference centers and small-town church basements and library meeting rooms and rural kitchens... The future of mental health reform will depend upon whether enough people gather in enough of such venues as these to contemplate work of Dorothea Dix by joining to reject and extinguish our modern Bedlams, and replace these Bedlams with a reborn and more sophisticated and more enduring program of moral care. It will depend upon whether enough people will take notice of and be inspired by the rediscovery made by sociologists and psychiatrists: that kindness, companionship, and intimate care are demonstrable counterforces to deepening psychosis. Not cures, but counterforces, particularly when practiced in concert with psychotropic regimens that fit the specific nature of a person's affliction as well as that person's specific biosystem.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dodie Clark

I felt guilty about that for a while until I realized everyone is just a collage of their favorite parts of other people.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jasmine Warga

What people never understand is that depression isn't about the outside; it's about the inside.

By Anonym 16 Sep

C. Joybell C

Everyone screams for help in their own different way. Just because you don't understand it, does not mean they're not screaming. Let's not have opinions or judgments on how people survive their lives.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Deborah Bray Haddock

DID is about survival! As more people begin to appreciate this concept, individuals with DID will start to feel less as though they have to hide in shame. DID develops as a response to extreme trauma that occurs at an early age and usually over an extended period of time.

By Anonym 18 Sep

John Corey Whaley

So he lay there in the dark without them ever knowing he wasn't okay. Because he'd learned a long time ago that the better they thought he was, the longer he could live this way.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Matt Purcell

It’s important to point out that mental health is more about wellness rather than sickness.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Criss Jami

When you're truly awesome, you know that it's actually a burden and wish day after day to be relieved of such a curse. Think of about 95% of the superheroes.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michele Rosenthal

if your brain changes in response to experience, then you have the opportunity to deliberately help your brain change again based on new experiences you create.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victoria Ward

A question that always makes me hazy is it me or are the others crazy' Albert Einstein

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kate Zambreno

People are more concerned about the economy then these ridiculous concerns as to gender inequity in society, as manifested in marriages, in the mental health system, and then in literature.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Cheryl Hersha

There are two types of memory frequently experienced by individuals who have had overwhelming trauma that has been suppressed psychologically or chemically. The first is general memory, experienced as an adult, in which there is a natural recall of early events. The other is the memory that is often associated with post traumatic stress syndrome (PTSS). The person suddenly smells, sees and feels as though he or she is actually living the event that took place months or years earlier. Many soldiers who survived horrifying combat experiences have PTSS. This has frequently been discussed in terms of Vietnam veterans who suddenly mentally find themselves in the jungle, hiding from the enemy or assaulting people they see as a threat. The fact that they have not been in Vietnam for decades and that they are experiencing the flashbacks in shopping malls, at home or at work does not change what they are mentally reliving. But PTSS has existed for centuries and has affected men, women and children in the midst of all wars, horrifying natural disasters and other traumatic experiences. This includes physical and sexual abuse when growing up. the PTSS Cheryl was experiencing more and more frequently, in which she found herself seeing, feeling and re-experiencing events from her childhood and adolescence had become overwhelming. She knew she needed to get help.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Vedat Sar

DID patients often feel very isolated/lonely, in the sense that they believe they are the only one in the universe who is “different” from others and that they do not understand themselves... DePrince et al found that alienation was the only cognitive appraisal variable to differentiate DID from PTSD. While the groups had similar appraisals of shame, betrayal, self-blame, anger, and fear, the DID participants had higher appraisal of themselves as experiencing alienation. This construct is associated with feeling alone, disconnected, and different.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Alain De Botton

Mental health: having enough safe places in your mind for your thoughts to settle.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Caroline Knapp

Being known. This, of course, is the goal, the agenda so carefully hidden it may be unknown even to the self. The cutter cuts to make the pain at her center visible. The anorexic starves to make manifest her hunger and vulnerability. The extremes announce, This is who I am, this is what I feel, this is what happens when I don't get what I need. In quadraphonic sound, they give voice to the most central human hunger, which is the desire to be recognized, to be known and loved because of, and in spite of, who you are; they give voice to the sorrow that takes root when that hunger is unsatisfied.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Siri Hustvedt

I've always thought of wholeness and integration as necessary myths. We're fragmented beings who cement ourselves together, but there are always cracks. Living with the cracks is part of being, well, reasonably healthy

By Anonym 19 Sep

Aberjhani

There is nothing sane, merciful, heroic, devout, redemptive, wise, holy, loving, peaceful, joyous, righteous, gracious, remotely spiritual, or worthy of praise where mass murder is concerned. We have been in this world long enough to know that by now and to understand that nonviolent conflict resolution informed by mutual compassion is the far better option.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Michael W. Otto

The process of mindfully shifting your attention among inputs may offer you mood benefits, in addition to the mood lift that exercise itself will bring you. Shifting attention in this way may well strengthen the part of your brain that acts to dampen down the ruminations that occur during depression. Shifting attention also makes you able to enjoy richer experiences. You can't lose—whether it is a useful brain exercise for fighting the ruminations of depression or simply a way to drink in joy while exerting yourself, guiding your attention mindfully has its benefits.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Alice Jamieson

Some alters are what Dr Ross describes in Multiple Personality Disorder as 'fragments'. which are 'relatively limited psychic states that express only one feeling, hold one memory, or carry out a limited task in the person's life. A fragment might be a frightened child who holds the memory of one particular abuse incident.' In complex multiples, Dr Ross continues, the 'personalities are relatively full-bodied, complete states capable of a range of emotions and behaviours.' The alters will have 'executive control some substantial amount of time over the person's life'. He stresses, and I repeat his emphasis, 'Complex MPD with over 15 alter personalities and complicated amnesia barriers are associated with 100 percent frequency of childhood physical, sexual and emotional abuse.' Did I imagine the castle, the dungeon, the ritual orgies and violations? Did Lucy, Billy, Samuel, Eliza, Shirley and Kato make it all up? I went back to the industrial estate and found the castle. It was an old factory that had burned to the ground, but the charred ruins of the basement remained. I closed my eyes and could see the black candles, the dancing shadows, the inverted pentagram, the people chanting through hooded robes. I could see myself among other children being abused in ways that defy imagination. I have no doubt now that the cult of devil worshippers was nothing more than a ring of paedophiles, the satanic paraphernalia a cover for their true lusts: the innocent bodies of young children.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Brian Spellman

I can't answer you in a nutshell. We wouldn't fit unless we saw the same shrink.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Israel Morrow

Jesus commanded, 'Take up your cross and follow me.' That doesn't accord well with an evening spent on the therapist's couch. Americans do not ask for help--physically or psychologically--because the more we suffer, the more we are convinced we're doing the right thing. When our words and actions are hated, we think we must be speaking the truth. 'For thus they persecuted the prophets.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Diriye Osman

There may not be any romance to mental illness but who needs romance when the preferable route is agency? The prevailing conversation around mental health issues is agency and the lack thereof on the part of the mentally ill. But what do you do if you’re a paid-up member of the mentally ill populace in question? Do you curl up into a ball and give up? No, you look for solutions. Ultimately, it’s about keeping despair at bay and sometimes simple things like running, taking up a hobby, doing charity work, painting or, in my case, writing can be a galvanizing part of the recovery process. Keeping the brain and the body active can give life a semblance of pleasure and hope. This is what writing has done for me. I took every traumatic element of my condition and channelled it into something useful.