Best 1 039 of Mental health quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 17 Sep

Kim Noble

Living with multiple personalities is not something you just wake up fully understanding. For months, maybe years after I first accepted the diagnosis, I was still discovering new nuances, fresh areas I hadn't considered.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ken Wheaton

Prideful fool. It hurt his feelings that he couldn’t make my crazy go away. You know how men are. Always trying to fix things can’t be fixed.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Rae Earl

I’m so NUMB. I just don’t care, it seems-but I must do. This is all going to sound totally incoherent. I’m that bunged up, but totally empty. I think my worries about who I am have reached a head. I mean who is Rae Earl? I think I know myself, but then other people say things.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Jacqueline Simon Gunn

It’s unfortunate that inflated self-worth is being mistaken for confidence when it’s really an indication of the opposite. True confidence is reflected through humility, vulnerability and kindness. It’s quiet. It’s subtle. It does not overwhelm. It does not shrink others down to elevate oneself and it doesn’t not knock others down to give the illusion of being above.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ned Vizzini

After college, I went through my own shit and decided that all physical suffering in the world couldn't compare to mental anguish. And when I got myself, I decided to help other people.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Sharon Salzberg

When emotions are long held and extremely complex, it sometimes takes years for them to enter fully into awareness.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ned Vizzini

I'm young, but I'm already screwing up my life. I'm smart but not enough - just smart enough to have problems.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Janjan Untamed

The truth sounds like an insult to crazy people in denial.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Martin Baker

Be who you are. Do what you can. Embrace the journey.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Megan Atwood

But you can't hide from the day forever. The day happens anyway, you know.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Forrest Carr

You know how they say that if you think you might be going crazy, it’s proof that you’re not? Well, it’s a lie. One of many they tell you about mental illness.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Kierra C. T. Banks

Yes, you may love them to death, but are they willing to love you to life?

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sylvia Plath

My mother smiled. "I knew my baby wasn't like that." I looked at her. "Like what?" "Like those awful people. Those awful dead people at that hospital." She paused. "I knew you'd decide to be all right again.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Robin Silverman

Because minds do blow and hearts do break. Those are not just sayings. And wolves and roaches are not the only creatures that chew off their legs to get out of traps—human beings do that, too.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Michael A. Taylor

As we have learned more and more about the brain and how it generates complex behaviours, U.S. psychiatry remains wedded to a diagnostic and treatment system over 60 years old: identify a few clinical features that match a diagnostic label in the DSM and then apply the treatments that are said to work for the category of the patient. It Is a cookbook diagnosis and treatment. Without thought, labels are applied and drugs with significant side effects but with only the modest efficiency are prescribed. Various brands of psychotherapy are offered with little consideration of what actually helps and which patients are best suited to a particular brand. This is twenty-first century U.S. psychiatry. As a field in my view ignored the oath to first, do no harm.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jacquelyn Middleton

There's no shame in getting help. There's no shame in being a work in progress.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Michael Lewis

Holding one's self responsible is a critical feature in stigma and in the generation of shame since violation of standards, rules, and goals are insufficient in its elicitation unless responsibility can be placed on the self. Stigma may differ from other elicitors of shame and guilt, in part because it is a social appearance factor. The degree to which the stigma is socially apparent is the degree to which one must negotiate the issue of blame, not only for one's self but between one's self and the other who is witness to the stigma. Stigmatization is a much more powerful elicitor of shame and guilt in that it requires a negotiation not only between one's self and one's attributions, but between one's self and the attributions of others.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Steven Magee

Jail has become the biggest mental health hospital.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Christina G. Hibbert Psy. D.

Maybe this is a second doctoral program: advanced learning about life, death, marriage, mothering, family, faith, patience, prayer. My degree will be 'Doctor of Life,' and I will be in good company. So many of us earn our 'Doctor of Life' degrees.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Danu Morrigan

You are not broken and in need of fixing. You are wounded and in need of healing.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Glendon Swarthout

If others fell by the wayside, dear women and strong, loved by men, how had she, single and unloved, kept her sanity?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Clarice Lispector

Sometimes writing a single line is enough to save your own heart.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Sigmund Freud

…much will be gained if we succeed in transforming your hysterical misery into common unhappiness. With a mental life that has been restored to health, you will be better armed against that unhappiness.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sylvia Plath

They want you to be in a special ward,” my mother said. “They don’t have that sort of ward at our hospital.” “I liked it where I was.” My mother’s mouth tightened. “You should have behaved better, then.” “What?” “You shouldn’t have broken that mirror. Then maybe they’d have let you stay.” But of course I knew the mirror had nothing to do with it

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jaime Bartolotta

What do you want to do with this? she whispered tightly. Honestly? I intoned. Burn it.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Juansen Dizon

Your mental health is more important than everything.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Ami Desu

The worst part about anxiety attacks, is that you’re aware it’s irrational and sometimes unexplainable, but knowing that gives no aid what so ever. In most cases, it deepens the anxiety as you realise “if I know it’s irrational, why can’t I stop it… Oh god I can’t stop it” you begin to believe you are no longer in control of your mind. That. That is fear.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Israel Morrow

Jesus commanded, 'Take up your cross and follow me.' That doesn't accord well with an evening spent on the therapist's couch. Americans do not ask for help--physically or psychologically--because the more we suffer, the more we are convinced we're doing the right thing. When our words and actions are hated, we think we must be speaking the truth. 'For thus they persecuted the prophets.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Karen Marshall

Prior to the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), the diagnosis of Dissociative Identity Disorder had been referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder. The renaming of this diagnosis has caused quite a bit of confusion among professionals and those who live with DID. Because dissociation describes the process by which DID begins to develop, rather than the actual outcome of this process (the formation of various personalities), this new term may be a bit unclear. We know that the diagnosis is DID and that DID is what people say we have. We’d just like to point out that words sometimes do not describe what we live with. For people like us, DID is just a step on the way to where we live—a place with many of us inside! We just want people who have little ones and bigger ones living inside to know that the title Dissociative Identity Disorder sounds like something other than how we see ourselves—we think it is about us having different personalities. Regardless of the term, it is clear that, in general, the different personalities develop as a reaction to severe trauma. When the person dissociates, they leave their body to get away from the pain or trauma. When this defense is not strong enough to protect the person, different personalities emerge to handle the experience. These personalities allow the child to survive: when the child is being harmed or experiencing traumatic episodes, the other personalities take the pain and/ or watch the bad things. This allows these children to return to their body after the bad things have happened without any awareness of what has occurred. They do this to create different ways to make sense of the harm inflicted upon them; it is their survival mechanism.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Alice Jamieson

The word is dissociate. There is no 'a' before the 'ss'. People invariably say dis-a-ssociate, which, if you're suffering Disso-ciative Identity Disorder/Multiple Personality Disorder, can be irritating. People then want to know how many personalities I have and the answer is: I don't know. The first book about Multiple Personality Disorder to make an impact was Flora Rheta Schreiber's Sybil, published in 1973, which carries the subtitle: The True and Extraordinary Story of a Woman Possessed by Sixteen Separate Personalities. Corbett H. Thigpen and Hervey M. Cleckley published the controversial The Three Faces of Eve much earlier in 1957, and Pete Townshend from The Who wrote the song 'Four Faces'. People seem to feel safe with numbers. The truth is more complicated. The kids emerged over time. Billy, the boisterous five-year-old, was at first the most dominant. But he slowly stood aside for JJ, the self-confident ten-year-old who appears when Alice is under stress and handles complicated situations like travelling on the Underground and meeting new people. The first entity to visit was the external voice of the Professor. But he had a choir of accomplices without names. So, how many actual alter personalities are there? I would say more than fifteen and less than thirty, a combination of protectors, persecutors and friends - my own family tree.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Patrick W. Corrigan

Several themes describe misconceptions about mental illness and corresponding stigmatizing attitudes. Media analyses of film and print have identified three: people with mental illness are homicidal maniacs who need to be feared; they have childlike perceptions of the world that should be marveled; or they are responsible for their illness because they have weak character (29-32)." World Psychiatry. 2002 Feb; 1(1): 16–20. PMCID: PMC1489832 Understanding the impact of stigma on people with mental illness PATRICK W CORRIGAN and AMY C WATSON

By Anonym 13 Sep

Phyllis Chesler

Ideal mental health, like freedom, exists for one person only if it exists for all people.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Stefanie Sybens

There was so much good stuff, and all I could feel was the bad

By Anonym 19 Sep

Andrena Sawyer

The problem with social media is that it's great for your ego, but terrible for your sanity.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Christine Heppermann

If you find the dividing line between fairy tales and reality, let me know. In my mind, the two run together, even though the intersections aren't always obvious. The girl sitting quietly in class or waiting for the bus or roaming the mall doesn't want anyone to know, or doesn't know how to tell anyone, that she is locked in a tower. Maybe she's a prisoner of a story she's heard all her life- that fairest means best, or that bruises prove she is worthy of love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Celeste Ng

Anger is fear's bodyguard

By Anonym 18 Sep

Sarah Kane

- Please. Don't switch off my mind by attempting to straighten me. Listen and understand, and when you feel contempt don't express it, at least not verbally, at least not to me. (Silence.) - I don't feel contempt. - No? - No. It's not your fault. - It's not your fault. That's all I ever hear, it's not your fault, it's an illness, it's not your fault, I know it's not my fault. You've told me that so often I'm beginning to think it is my fault. - It's not your fault. - I KNOW. - But you allow it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Mark Fisher

Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS. In his book The Selfish Capitalist, Oliver James has convincingly posited a correlation between rising rates of mental distress and the neoliberal mode of capitalism practiced in countries like Britain, the USA and Australia. In line with James’s claims, I want to argue that it is necessary to reframe the growing problem of stress (and distress) in capitalist societies. Instead of treating it as incumbent on individuals to resolve their own psychological distress, instead, that is, of accepting the vast privatization of stress that has taken place over the last thirty years, we need to ask: how has it become acceptable that so many people, and especially so many young people, are ill?

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sabrina Benaim

everybody loves me because i'm good at making people feel good. i'm good at making people feel good because i have had a lot of practice on myself

By Anonym 16 Sep

Anna White

I've had a lot of therapists, so I've had the opportunity to approach my fear in many different ways. I've faced it head on and sideways and tried to tiptoe up behind it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sasha Scarr

I'm not a good person, sure. But I don't think I'm a bad person either. I feel like abraded is a better word for me. I'm only 22 but I often feel as if I'm twice that. Not in the sense of having wisdom or experience, of course. I just feel worn away by the world. I'm often exhausted and impatient both mentally and physically. I've so quickly become a "get it over with" or "avoid completely" kind of person. It's even ruined my ability to have healthy relationships despite my excitement for romance.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Michael Connelly

You can't patch a wounded soul with a Band-Aid.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Alice Jamieson

During this hour in the waking streets I felt at ease, at peace; my body, which I despised, operated like a machine. I was spaced out, the catchphrase my friends at school used to describe their first experiments with marijuana and booze. This buzzword perfectly described a picture in my mind of me, Alice, hovering just below the ceiling like a balloon and looking down at my own small bed where a big man lay heavily on a little girl I couldn’t quite see or recognize. It wasn’t me. I was spaced out on the ceiling. I had that same spacey feeling when I cooked for my father, which I still did, though less often. I made omelettes, of course. I cracked a couple of eggs into a bowl, and as I reached for the butter dish, I always had an odd sensation in my hands and arms. My fingers prickled; it didn’t feel like me but someone else cutting off a great chunk of greasy butter and putting it into the pan. I’d add a large amount of salt — I knew what it did to your blood pressure, and I mumbled curses as I whisked the brew. When I poured the slop into the hot butter and shuffled the frying pan over the burner, it didn’t look like my hand holding the frying-pan handle and I am sure it was someone else’s eyes that watched the eggs bubble and brown. As I dropped two slices of wholemeal bread in the toaster, I would observe myself as if from across the room and, with tingling hands gripping the spatula, folded the omelette so it looked like an apple envelope. My alien hands would flip the omelette on to a plate and I’d spread the remainder of the butter on the toast when the two slices of bread leapt from the toaster. ‘Delicious,’ he’d say, commenting on the food before even trying it.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Hippocrates

Persons who have a painful affection in any part of the body, and are in a great measure sensible of the pain, are disordered in intellect.

By Anonym 15 Sep

K. Y. Robinson

dear depression you are a swallowed island. a continental shelf of grief. an underwater prison. a fog holding the sky hostage and chasing away the blue...

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lidia Yuknavitch

It dawned on me that we have to breathe and to find reasons to stay alive on our own terms.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Diriye Osman

There may not be any romance to mental illness but who needs romance when the preferable route is agency? The prevailing conversation around mental health issues is agency and the lack thereof on the part of the mentally ill. But what do you do if you’re a paid-up member of the mentally ill populace in question? Do you curl up into a ball and give up? No, you look for solutions. Ultimately, it’s about keeping despair at bay and sometimes simple things like running, taking up a hobby, doing charity work, painting or, in my case, writing can be a galvanizing part of the recovery process. Keeping the brain and the body active can give life a semblance of pleasure and hope. This is what writing has done for me. I took every traumatic element of my condition and channelled it into something useful.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Are you a kind of person who likes to keep all your emotions hidden from the people around you! Do you prefer restraining your feelings a little too much! In that case, you must know that too much emotional suppression can have catastrophic impact over your body.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Matt Haig

I was scared. I couldn’t not be. Being scared is what anxiety is all about.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sarah Wilson

It can be a good thing, too, to learn to sit in your own weirdness.