Best 1 136 of Victor Hugo quotes - MyQuotes

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Victor Hugo
By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

There is will in the thought, there is none in the dream. The dream, which is completely spontaneous, takes and keeps, even in the gigantic and the ideal, the form of our mind. Nothing springs more directly and more sincerely from the very bottom of our souls than our unreflected and indefinite aspirations towards the splendours of destiny.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

A faith is a necessity to a man. Woe to him who believes in nothing.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

The aim of art is almost divine: to bring to life again if it is writing history, to create if it is writing poetry.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Taste is the common sense of genius.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Victor Hugo

Who knows how easily ambition disguises itself under the name of a calling, possibly in good faith and deceiving itself, in sanctimonious confusion?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

The transept belfry and the two towers were to him three great cages, the birds in which, taught by him, would sing for him alone. Yet it was these same bells which had made him deaf; but mothers are often fondest of the child who has made them suffer most.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Since we shall love each other, I shall be great and you shall be rich.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

You have enemies? Why, it is the story of every man who has done a great deed or created a new idea. It is the cloud which thunders around everything that shines. Fame must have enemies, as light must have gnats. Do no bother yourself about it; disdain. Keep your mind serene as you keep your life clear.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

Ever since history has been written, ever since philosophy has meditated, misery has been the garment of the human race.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Freedom in art, freedom in society, this is the double goal towards which all consistent and logical minds must strive.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Whenever a man's friends begin to compliment him about looking young, he may be sure that they think he is growing old.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

There are moments when a rope's end, a pole, the branch of the tree, is life itself, and it is a frightful thing to see a living being lose his hold upon it, and fall like a ripe fruit.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

Victory, when it is in accord with progress, merits the applause of the people; but a heroic defeat merits their tender compassion. The one is magnificent, the other sublime. For our own part, we prefer martyrdom to success.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

In a vast space left free between the crowd and the fire, a young girl was dancing. Whether this young girl was a human being, a fairy, or an angel, is what Gringoire, sceptical philosopher and ironical poet that he was, could not decide at the first moment, so fascinated was he by this dazzling vision. She was not tall, though she seemed so, so boldly did her slender form dart about. She was swarthy of complexion, but one divined that, by day, her skin must possess that beautiful golden tone of the Andalusians and the Roman women. Her little foot, too, was Andalusian, for it was both pinched and at ease in its graceful shoe. She danced, she turned, she whirled rapidly about on an old Persian rug, spread negligently under her feet; and each time that her radiant face passed before you, as she whirled, her great black eyes darted a flash of lightning at you. All around her, all glances were riveted, all mouths open; and, in fact, when she danced thus, to the humming of the Basque tambourine, which her two pure, rounded arms raised above her head, slender, frail and vivacious as a wasp, with her corsage of gold without a fold, her variegated gown puffing out, her bare shoulders, her delicate limbs, which her petticoat revealed at times, her black hair, her eyes of flame, she was a supernatural creature.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

The beginning as well as the end of all his thoughts was hatred of human law, that hatred which, if it be not checked in its growth by some providential event, becomes, in a certain time, hatred of society, then hatred of the human race, and then hatred of creation, and reveals itself by a vague and incessant desire to injure some living being, it matters not who.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Genius: the superhuman in man.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Society is a republic. When an individual tries to lift themselves above others, they are dragged down by the mass, either by ridicule or slander.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Victor Hugo

On a tant abusé du regard dans les romans d'amour qu'on a fini par le déconsidérer. C'est à peine si l'on ose dire maintenant que deux êtres se sont aimés parce qu'ils se sont regardés. C'est pourtant comme cela qu'on s'aime et uniquement comme cela. Le reste n'est que le reste, et vient après. Rien n'est plus réel que ces grandes secousses que deux âmes se donnent en échangeant cette étincelle.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

All roads are blocked to a philosophy which reduces everything to the word 'no.' To 'no' there is only one answer and that is 'yes.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Does not beauty confer a benefit upon us, even by the simple fact of being beautiful?

By Anonym 17 Sep

Victor Hugo

Monsieur, innocence is its own crown! Innocence has only to act to be noble! She is as august in rags as fleur de lys.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Curiosity is one of the forms of feminine bravery.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

The scaffold is the accomplice of the executioner; it devours, it eats flesh, it drinks blood; the scaffold is a sort of monster fabricated by the judge and the carpenter, a spectre which seems to live with a horrible vitality composed of all the death which it has inflicted.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

At the shrine of friendship never say die, let the wine of friendship never run dry

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

The left-handed are precious; they take places which are inconvenient for the rest.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

One only needs to see a smile in a white crape bonnet in order to enter the palace of dreams.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

It is by suffering that human beings become angels.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

To meditate is to labour; to think is to act.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

Hardly had the light been extinguished, when a peculiar trembling began to affect the netting under which the three children lay. It consisted of a multitude of dull scratches which produced a metallic sound, as if claws and teeth were gnawing at the copper wire. This was accompanied by all sorts of little piercing cries. The little five-year-old boy, on hearing this hubbub overhead, and chilled with terror, jogged his brother's elbow; but the elder brother had already shut his peepers, as Gavroche had ordered. Then the little one, who could no longer control his terror, questioned Gavroche, but in a very low tone, and with bated breath:-- "Sir?" "Hey?" said Gavroche, who had just closed his eyes. "What is that?" "It's the rats," replied Gavroche. And he laid his head down on the mat again. The rats, in fact, who swarmed by thousands in the carcass of the elephant, and who were the living black spots which we have already mentioned, had been held in awe by the flame of the candle, so long as it had been lighted; but as soon as the cavern, which was the same as their city, had returned to darkness, scenting what the good story-teller Perrault calls "fresh meat," they had hurled themselves in throngs on Gavroche's tent, had climbed to the top of it, and had begun to bite the meshes as though seeking to pierce this new-fangled trap. Still the little one could not sleep. "Sir?" he began again. "Hey?" said Gavroche. "What are rats?" "They are mice." This explanation reassured the child a little. He had seen white mice in the course of his life, and he was not afraid of them. Nevertheless, he lifted up his voice once more. "Sir?" "Hey?" said Gavroche again. "Why don't you have a cat?" "I did have one," replied Gavroche, "I brought one here, but they ate her." This second explanation undid the work of the first, and the little fellow began to tremble again. The dialogue between him and Gavroche began again for the fourth time:-- "Monsieur?" "Hey?" "Who was it that was eaten?" "The cat." "And who ate the cat?" "The rats." "The mice?" "Yes, the rats." The child, in consternation, dismayed at the thought of mice which ate cats, pursued:-- "Sir, would those mice eat us?" "Wouldn't they just!" ejaculated Gavroche. The child's terror had reached its climax. But Gavroche added:-- "Don't be afraid. They can't get in. And besides, I'm here! Here, catch hold of my hand. Hold your tongue and shut your peepers!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

We have both been talking about you. Cosette loves you so dearly! You must not forget that you have a chamber here, we want nothing more to do with the Rue de l'Homme Armé. We will have no more of it at all. How could you go to live in a street like that, which is sickly, which is disagreeable, which is ugly, which has a barrier at one end, where one is cold, and into one cannot enter? You are to come and install yourself here. And this very day. Or you will have to deal with Cosette. She means to lead us all by the nose, I warn you. You have your own chamber here, it is close to ours, it opens on the garden; the trouble with the clock has been attended to, the bed is made, it is all ready, you have only to take possession of it. Near your bed Cosette has placed a huge, old, easy-chair covered with Utrecht velvet and she has said to it: 'Stretch out your arms to him.' A nightingale comes to the clump of acacias opposite your windows every spring. In two months more you will have it. You will have its nest on your left and ours on your right. By night it will sing, and by day Cosette will prattle. Your chamber faces due South. Cosette will arrange your books for you, your Voyages of Captain Cook and the other,— Vancouver's and all your affairs. I believe that there is a little valise to which you are attached, I have fixed upon a corner of honor for that. You have conquered my grandfather, you suit him. We will live together. Do you play whist? you will overwhelm my grandfather with delight if you play whist. It is you who shall take Cosette to talk on the days when I am at the courts, you shall give her your arm, you know, as you used to, in the Luxembourg. We are absolutely resolved to be happy. And you shall be included in it, in our happiness, do you hear, father? Come, will you breakfast with us to-day?" "Sir," said Jean Valjean, "I have something to say to you. I am an ex-convict.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

As for methods of prayer, all of them are good as long as they are sincere.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Nobody knows like a woman how to say things at the same time sweet and profound. Sweetness and depth, this is all of woman; this is all of Heaven.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Woe, alas, to those who have loved only bodies, forms, appearances! Death will rob them of everything. Try to love souls, you will find them again.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

There is always a patch of blue sky to lovers, although the rest of the world may see nothing but their umbrellas.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

He would give all of his clothes to his servant, admonishing him NOT to return them until he had completed his day's work.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Animals are nothing but the portrayal of our virtues and vices made manifest to our eyes, the visible reflections of our souls.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

The Parisian is to the French what the Athenian was to the Greeks: no one sleeps better than he, no one is more openly frivolous and idle, no one appears more heedless. But this is misleading. He is given to every kind of listlessness, but when there is glory to be won he may be inspired with every kind of fury. Give him a pike and he will enact the tenth of August, a musket and you have Austerlitz. He was the springboard of Napoleon and the mainstay of Danton. At the cry of "la patrie" he enrols, and at the call of liberty he tears up the pavements. Beware of him!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

First of all, I wish you love, and that by loving you may also be loved. But if it’s not like that, be brief in forgetting And after you’ve forgotten, don’t keep anything.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Often when we think we are knotting one thread, we are tying quite another.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

It is often necessary to know how to obey a woman in order sometimes to have the right to command her.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

For, to make deserts, God, who rules mankind, Begins with kings, and ends the work by wind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Youth is the future smiling at a stranger, which is itself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

A translation in verse . . . seems to me something absurd, impossible.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

If she gives me all her time it is because I have all her heart.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

I'm not totally useless. I can be used as a bad example.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

The head which does not turn backwards towards horizons that have vanished contains neither thought nor love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

The reduction of the universe to the compass of a single being, and the extension of a single being until it reaches God - that is love. Love is the salute of the angels to the stars. How sad is the heart when rendered sad by love! How great is the void created by the absence of the being who alone fills the world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Enthusiasm is the fever of reason.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

The day that a woman who is passing before you sheds a light upon you as she goes, you are lost, you love. You have then but one thing to do: to think of her so earnestly that she will be compelled to think of you.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

My misfortune is that I still resemble a man too much. I should liked to be wholly a beast like that goat. - Quasimodo