Best 1 136 of Victor Hugo quotes - MyQuotes

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Victor Hugo
By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

They say love is blindness of heart; I say not to love is blindness.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Memory is a gulf that a word can move to its lowest depths.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Cheerfulness is like money well expended in charity; the more we dispense of it, the greater our possession.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Victor Hugo

Je vois de la lumière neuve (I see a new light)

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

I represent a party which does not yet exist: the party Revolution-Civilization. This party will make the twentieth century. There will issue from it first the United States of Europe, then the United States of the World.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

The convent is supreme egotism resulting in supreme self-denial.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

To meditate is to labour; to think is to act.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

One of the hardest tasks is to extract continually from one's soul an almost inexhaustible ill will.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

I wanted to see you again, touch you, know who you were, see if I would find you identical with the ideal image of you which had remained with me and perhaps shatter my dream with the aid of reality. -Claude Frollo

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

She dropped her head again on Marius' knees, and her eyelids closed. He thought the poor soul had departed. Eponine remained motionless. All at once, at the very moment when Marius fancied her asleep forever, she slowly opened her eyes in which appeared the sombre profundity of death, and said to him in a tone whose sweetness seemed already to proceed from another world:-- "And by the way, Monsieur Marius, I believe that I was a little bit in love with you." She tried to smile once more and expired.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

When dictatorship is a fact, revolution becomes a right.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

As with stomachs, we should pity minds that do not eat.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

The time for it has come, and it would indeed be strange if, in the present age, liberty, like light, should penetrate everywhere, except into that one place where freedom finds its most natural realm - in the world of ideas.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

Police chiefs don't think a cat can possibly turn into a lion; and yet, it happens.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

My misfortune is that I still resemble a man too much. I should liked to be wholly a beast like that goat. - Quasimodo

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

People who are overwhelmed with troubles never do look back. They know only too well that misfortune follows in their footsteps.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

I advance in life, I grow more simple, and I become more and more patriotic for humanity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Should we continue to look upwards? Is the light we can see in the sky one of those which will presently be extinguished? The ideal is terrifying to behold... brilliant but threatened on all sides by the dark forces that surround it: nevertheless, no more in danger than a star in the jaws of the clouds.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Pain is as diverse as man. One suffers as one can.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

[He] had to submit to the fate of every newcomer in a small town, where many tongues talk but few heads think.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

From the oyster to the eagle, from the swine to the tiger, all animals are to be found in men and each of them exists in some man, sometimes several at the time. Animals are nothing but the portrayal of our virtues and vices made manifest to our eyes, the visible reflections of our souls. God displays them to us to give us food for thought.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

Phoebus de Chateaupers likewise came to a 'tragic end': he married.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Love is like a tree, it grows of its own accord, it puts down deep roots into our whole being.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Victor Hugo

Monsieur Bienvenu was simply a man who accepted these mysterious questions...and who had in his soul a deep respect for the mystery which enveloped them.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

Every man who has in his soul a secret feeling of revolt against any act of the State, of life, or of destiny, is on the verge of riot; and so soon as it appears, he begins to quiver, and to feel himself borne away by the whirlwind.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Of all the things that God has made, the human heart is the one which sheds the most light, alas! and the most darkness.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Seeing so much poverty everywhere makes me think that God is not rich. He gives the appearance of it, but I suspect some financial difficulties.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

The most beautiful of altars, he said, is the soul of an unhappy creature consoled and thankfing God.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Victor Hugo

Why, there's the air, the sky, the morning, the evening, moonlight, my friends, women, the beautiful architecture of Paris to study, three big books to write and all sorts of other things. Anaxagoras used to say that he was in the world in order to admire the sun. And then I have the good fortune to be able to spend my days from morning to night in the company of a man of genius - myself - and it's very pleasant.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Slowly he took out the clothes in which, ten years beforem Cosette had left Montfermeil; first the little dress, then the black scarf, then the great heavy child's shoes Cosette could still almost have worn, so small was her foot, then the vest of very thich fustian, then the knitted petticoat, the the apron with pockets, then the wool stockings.... Then his venerable white head fell on the bed, this old stoical heart broke, his face was swallowed up, so to speak, in Cosette's clothes, and anybody who had passed along the staircase at that moment would have heard irrepressible sobbing.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Every bad institution of this world ends by suicide.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Every bird which flies has the thread of the infinite in its claw. Germination includes the hatching of a meteor and the tap of a swallow's bill breaking the egg, and it leads forward the birth of an earth-worm and the advent of Socrates.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

When a woman is talking to you, listen to what she says with her eyes.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

What is admirable in the clash of young minds is that no one can foresee the spark that sets off an explosion or predict what kind of explosion it will be.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Was it possible that Napoleon should win the battle of Waterloo? We answer, No! Why? Because of Wellington? Because of Blucher? No! Because of God! For Bonaparte to conquer at Waterloo was not the law of the nineteenth century. It was time that this vast man should fall. He had been impeached before the Infinite! He had vexed God! Waterloo was not a battle. It was the change of front of the Universe!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

As we have explained, in first love the soul is taken long before the body; later the body is taken long before the soul; sometimes the soul is not taken at all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Go to sleep in peace. God is awake.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

At that moment of love, a moment when passion is absolutely silent under omnipotence of ecstasy, Marius, pure seraphic Marius, would have been more capable of visiting a woman of the streets than of raising Cosette’s dress above the ankle. Once on a moonlit night, Cosette stopped to pick up something from the ground, her dress loosened and revealed the swelling of her breasts. Marius averted his eyes.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Victor Hugo

What a great thing, to be loved! What a greater thing still, to love! The heart becomes heroic though passion…if no one loved, the sun would go out.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Victor Hugo

Nothing is more dangerous than discontinued labor; it is habit lost. A habit easy to abandon, difficult to resume.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Victor Hugo

When the nettle is young, the leaves make excellent greens; when it grows old it has filaments and fibers like hemp and flax. Cloth made from the nettle is as good as that made from hemp. Chopped up, the nettle is good for poultry; pounded, it is good for horned cattle. The seed of the nettle mixed with the fodder of animals gives a luster to their skin; the root, mixed with salt, produces a beautiful yellow dye. It makes, however, excellent hay, as it can be cut twice in a season. And what does the nettle need? very little soil, no care, no culture; except that the seeds fall as fast as they ripen, and it is difficult to gather them; that is all. If we would take a little pains, the nettle would be useful; we neglect it, and it becomes harmful. Then we kill it. How much men are like the nettle! My friends, remember this, that there are no weeds, and no worthless men, there are only bad farmers.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

Hardly had the light been extinguished, when a peculiar trembling began to affect the netting under which the three children lay. It consisted of a multitude of dull scratches which produced a metallic sound, as if claws and teeth were gnawing at the copper wire. This was accompanied by all sorts of little piercing cries. The little five-year-old boy, on hearing this hubbub overhead, and chilled with terror, jogged his brother's elbow; but the elder brother had already shut his peepers, as Gavroche had ordered. Then the little one, who could no longer control his terror, questioned Gavroche, but in a very low tone, and with bated breath:-- "Sir?" "Hey?" said Gavroche, who had just closed his eyes. "What is that?" "It's the rats," replied Gavroche. And he laid his head down on the mat again. The rats, in fact, who swarmed by thousands in the carcass of the elephant, and who were the living black spots which we have already mentioned, had been held in awe by the flame of the candle, so long as it had been lighted; but as soon as the cavern, which was the same as their city, had returned to darkness, scenting what the good story-teller Perrault calls "fresh meat," they had hurled themselves in throngs on Gavroche's tent, had climbed to the top of it, and had begun to bite the meshes as though seeking to pierce this new-fangled trap. Still the little one could not sleep. "Sir?" he began again. "Hey?" said Gavroche. "What are rats?" "They are mice." This explanation reassured the child a little. He had seen white mice in the course of his life, and he was not afraid of them. Nevertheless, he lifted up his voice once more. "Sir?" "Hey?" said Gavroche again. "Why don't you have a cat?" "I did have one," replied Gavroche, "I brought one here, but they ate her." This second explanation undid the work of the first, and the little fellow began to tremble again. The dialogue between him and Gavroche began again for the fourth time:-- "Monsieur?" "Hey?" "Who was it that was eaten?" "The cat." "And who ate the cat?" "The rats." "The mice?" "Yes, the rats." The child, in consternation, dismayed at the thought of mice which ate cats, pursued:-- "Sir, would those mice eat us?" "Wouldn't they just!" ejaculated Gavroche. The child's terror had reached its climax. But Gavroche added:-- "Don't be afraid. They can't get in. And besides, I'm here! Here, catch hold of my hand. Hold your tongue and shut your peepers!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

I am not in the world to care for my life, but for souls.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Thought is the labor of the intellect, reverie is its pleasure.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Certaines personnes sont méchantes uniquement par besoin de parler. Leur conversation, causerie dans le salon, bavardage dans l`antichambre, est comme ces cheminées qui usent vite le bois; il leur faut beaucoup de combustible; et le combustible, c'est le prochain.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Victor Hugo

Her soul trembled on her lips like a drop of dew on a flower.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Victor Hugo

Social problems go beyond borders. The sores of the human race, these running sores that cover the glove, don't stop at red or blue lines drawn on the map. Wherever men are ignorant and desperate, wherever women sell themselves for bread, wherever children suffer for want of instruction or a warm hearth, Les Misérables knocks on the door and says: Open up, I have come for you.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

Blacheville smiles with the self-satisfied smugness of a man whose vanity is tickled

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

I have an old hat which is not worth three francs, I have a coat which lacks buttons in front, my shirt is all ragged, my elbows are torn, my boots let in the water; for the last six weeks I have not thought about it, and I have not told you about it. You only see me at night, and you give me your love; if you were to see me in the daytime, you would give me a sou!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Victor Hugo

To think is of itself to be useful; it is always and in all cases a striving toward God.