Best 28 of Capital punishment quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 19 Sep

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

To kill for murder is an immeasurably greater evil than the actual crime itself. Judicial murder is immeasurably more horrible than one committed by a robber. Someone killed by a robber, knifed at night in forest or somewhere, certainly keeps hoping for a rescue right up to the last second. There have been instances of people whose throats have been cut still hoping for rescue right up to the last second. There have been instances of people whose throats have been cut still hoping, or running away, or pleading for their lives. But all this final hope, which makes dying ten times easier is taken away by that certain; the sentence is pronounced and the whole agony resides in the fact that there’s no escape. There is no greater torture in the world than that. Fetch a soldier and stand him right in front of a cannon during a battle and fire at him, he’ll go on hoping; but read out a certain death sentence to that same soldier and he’ll go off his head or bust into tears. Who can say that human nature can bear such a thing like that without going mad? Why this disgusting pointless, unnecessary mockery? Perhaps there exists a man who has had his sentence read out to him and been allowed to suffer before being told: “Be off, you’ve been pardoned.” That man could tell you perhaps. Christ himself spoke of such agony and terror. No, a man should not be treated so!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

We make needless ado about capital punishment,--taking lives, when there is no life to take.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Charles Dickens

What a fine thing capital punishment is! Dead men never repent; dead men never bring awkward stories to light. The prospect of the gallows, too, makes them hardy and bold. Ah, it’s a fine thing for the trade! Five of them strung up in a row, and none left to play booty or turn white-livered!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Richard Attenborough

I am passionately opposed to capital punishment, and I have been all my life.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Oscar Wilde

For each man kills the thing he loves yet each man does not die he does not die a death of shame on a day of dark disgrace nor have a noose about his neck, nor a cloth upon his face nor drop feet foremost through the floor into an empty space He does not sit with silent men who watch him night and day Who watch him when he tries to weep and when he tries to pray Who watch him lest himself should rob the prison of its prey

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sister Helen Prejean

[T]here are some human rights that are so deep that we can't negotiate them away. I mean people do heinous, terrible things. But there are basic human rights I believe that every human being has. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights in the United Nations says it for me. And it says there are two basic rights that can't be negotiated that government doesn't give for good behavior and doesn't take away for bad behavior. And it's the right not to be tortured and not to be killed. Because the flip side of this is that then when you say OK we're gonna turn over -- they truly have done heinous things, so now we will turn over to the government now the right to take their life. It involves other people in doing essentially the same kind of act." (PBS Frontline: Angel on Death Row)

By Anonym 17 Sep

Yevgeny Zamyatin

No matter how limited their powers of reason might have been. still they must have understood that living like that was just murder, a capital crime - except it was slow, day-by-day murder. The government (or humanity) could not permit capital punishment for one man, but they permitted the murder of millions a little at a time. To kill one man - that is, to subtract 50 years from the sum of all human lives - that was a crime; but to subtract from the sum of all human lives 50,000,000 years - that was not a crime! No, really, isn't it funny? This problem in moral math could be solved in half a minute by any ten-year-old Number today, but they couldn't solve it. All their Kant's together couldn't solve it (because it never occurred to one of their Kant's to construct a system of scientific ethics - that is, one based on subtraction, addition, division, and multiplication).

By Anonym 14 Sep

John Cabello

I would say that there are a lot of people who currently disagree with the death penalty, I just hope that it's never one of their family members that is killed, because then they will probably change their mind on capital punishment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Scott Turow

That led me to say that when push comes to shove, I'm against capital punishment.

By Anonym 16 Sep

R. J. Ellory

I think he killed someone already. Capital offense an’ all that.” Bailey tilted her head to one side. “That’s something that never made sense to me,” she said. “What?” “The death penalty. I mean, how does killing someone prove that killing people is wrong?

By Anonym 18 Sep

Yevgeny Zamyatin

The government (or humanity) would not permit capital punishment for one man, but they permitted the murder of millions a little at a time.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henrietta Newton Martin

It cannot be denied that in cases of child rape the question of consent cannot arise at all, simply because a child or worst still an infant lacks mental power or knowledge to provide "consent" or even lacks physical ability to restrain. Moreover such an act subjects the child/infant to physical trauma, leading to even physical, mental, and psychological ailment. To eliminate the horror from the face of the Earth, I firmly believe we need to accept capital punishment as an apt punishment for subjecting a child to such an ordeal.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Anton Chekhov

The State is not God. It has not the right to take away what it cannot restore when it wants to.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lamine Pearlheart

Does the act of incarceration work as deterrent against crime?" "No act can be a deterrent as long as the need or desperation to offend is greater.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Milan Kundera

I also think of those daily slaughters along the highways, of that death that is as horrible as it is banal and that bears no resemblance to cancer or AIDS because, as the work not of nature but of man, it is an almost voluntary death. How can it be that such a death fails to dumbfound us, to turn our lives upside down, to incite us to vast reforms? No, it does not dumbfound us, because like Pasenow, we have a poor sense of the real, and in the sur-real sphere of symbols, this death in the guise of a handsome car actually represents life; this smiling death is con-fused with modernity, freedom, adventure, just as Elisabeth was con-fused with the Virgin. This death of a man condemned to capital punishment, though infinitely rarer, much more readily draws our attention, rouses passions: confounded with the image of the executioner, it has a symbolic voltage that is far stronger, far darker and more repellent. Et cetera. Man is a child wandering lost—to cite Baudelaire`s poem again—in the "forests of symbols." (The criterion of maturity: the ability to resist symbols. But mankind grows younger all the time.)

By Anonym 16 Sep

Iain M. Banks

I once visited a place where they killed people by putting them in a chair. Not torture — that was common enough; beds and chairs were very much the par when it came to getting people helpless and confined, to inflict pain upon them — but actually set it up to kill them while they sat. They — get this — they either gassed them or they passed very high electric currents through them. A pellet dropped into a container beneath the seat, like some obscene image of a commode, producing a fatal gas; or a cap over their head, and their hands dipped in some conducting fluid, to fry their brains. You want to know the punch line? Yeah, [...] give us the punch line. This same state had a law that forbade — and I quote — “cruel and unusual punishments!” Can you believe that?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Lionel Jospin

I would like to see capital punishment suppressed in all democracies.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Joel Norris

The serial murderer often seeks the very form of capital punishment that is being held over his head as a deterrent.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Werner Herzog

I could not become an American citizen. I would not like to become a citizen of a country that has capital punishment.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henrietta Newton Martin

In the wake of prevalent child rape and child abuse cases reported and unreported; Infliction of “Death Penalty” for child rape irrespective of the degree of offence or homicide , and rigorous penalty for child molestation, would serve as an excellent deterrent mechanism Debates on Human Rights to the perpetrator of the crime on the question of infliction of death penalty should be cordoned off taking into consideration the aftermath of sexual assault /rape of a child exposed to the Pandora’s pack of resilience

By Anonym 13 Sep

Nancy Reagan

I favor capital punishment. It saves lives.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Albert Pierrepoint

Capital punishment in my view achieved nothing except revenge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anton Chekhov

If I were asked to chose between execution and life in prison I would, of course, chose the latter. It's better to live somehow than not at all.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

It is wrong to become absorbed in the divine law to such a degree as not to perceive human law. Death belongs to God alone. By what right do men touch that unknown thing?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Cesare Beccaria

The murder that is depicted as a horrible crime is repeated in cold blood, remorselessly.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Bryan Stevenson

Why do we want to kill all the broken people?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Woody Allen

Isn't all mankind ultimately executed for a crime it never committed?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hannah Kent

Agnes: "I have a question for you, speaking of truth. You say God speaks the truth." Tóti: "Yes." Agnes: "And God said: 'Thou shalt not kill.' Tóti: "Yes. Tóti said carefully." Agnes: "Then Blondal and the rest are going against God. They're hypocrites. They say they are carrying out God's law but they are only doing the will of men.