Best 26 of David Henry Hwang quotes - MyQuotes

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David Henry Hwang
By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

As soon as a Western man comes into contact with the East -- he's already confused. The West has sort of an international rape mentality towards the East. ...Basically, 'Her mouth says no, but her eyes say yes.' The West thinks of itself as masculine -- big guns, big industry, big money -- so the East is feminine -- weak, delicate, poor...but good at art, and full of inscrutable wisdom -- the feminine mystique. Her mouth says no, but her eyes say yes. The West believes the East, deep down, wants to be dominated -- because a woman can't think for herself. ...You expect Oriental countries to submit to your guns, and you expect Oriental women to be submissive to your men.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I now know that to do a worthwhile family history I must interpret the past without falling into either demonizing or unquestioning acceptance. . . . As a playwright, what I object to right now is any form of fundamentalism, whether it's nationalistic, religious or ethnic. . . . I think it is ridiculous - and fundamentalist, by the way - to say that I am not changed by the culture around me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Why, in the Peking Opera, are women's roles played by men?...Because only a man knows how a woman is supposed to act.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I've never quite understood the idea of a "season." Whenever an artistic director says to me, 'I have this slot,' I always start to feel we're parking cars or something.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Well, there's no guarantee of failure in life like happiness in high school.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

To me to write well is to battle stereotypes. To write well is to create three-dimensional characters that seem human.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Originally the structure was . . . a modern narrator who would appear intermittently and talk about his memories of his grandmother, which would then be juxtaposed against scenes from the past. But the stories from the past were always more interesting that the things in the present. I find this almost endemic to modern plays that veer between past and present. . . . So as we've gone on developing GOLDEN CHILD, the scenes from the past have become more dominant, and all that remains of the present are these two little bookends that frame the action.

By Anonym 16 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Happiness is so rare that our mind can turn somersaults to protect it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Yellow Face marks my summation of multiculturalism.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I knew I was Chinese, but growing up, it never occurred to me that that had any particular implication or that it should differentiate me in any way. I thought it was a minor detail, like having red hair.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Tonight, I've finally learned to tell fantasy from reality. And, knowing the difference, I choose fantasy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Chinese culture in general is not very religious. Confucianism is more a code of ethics than a religion, and ancestor worship is a way for parents to control you even after theyre dead.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Yes, I am one of those people who feels that most of my work is adaptation of one sort or another. For me, it's a way to jump-start the engine. For example, some people use the technique of basing a character on a friend. They start writing with his or her voice, then at a certain point, the character takes off on his or her own. It probably no longer resembles the model, but it helped the author to get going. I find that's true of form, too. For every play I've written, I know what play I was trying to imitate. That helps me get going.

By Anonym 16 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I'm happy. Which often looks like crazy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Sometimes I hate you, sometimes I hate myself, but always I miss you

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I define the American dream as the ability to imagine a way that you want your life to turn out, and have a reasonable hope that you can achieve that.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

The West believes the East, deep down, wants to be dominated, because a woman can’t think for herself

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Ive studied Chinese in college, but basically, Im not bilingual.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

This is the ultimate cruelty, isn't it? That I can talk and talk and to anyone listening, it's only air--too rich a diet to be swallowed by a mundane world.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

. . . I felt I was finally in a position to affect not only the artistic content of the American theatre, but also its institutional structures. This has been an important goal of mine, as there have always been a variety of issues - artistic freedom, author's rights, access by minority groups - which have concerned me and even influenced my decision to become a playwright in the first place.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I visited a new cultural center in Shanghai in 2005 that was pretty much perfect, except for the really badly translated Chinglish signs: a handicapped restroom that said Deformed Mans Toilet, that kind of thing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Time flies when you’re being stupid.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

I felt pretty good growing up. I didnt feel a lot of prejudice or racism. But I do remember, if there was going to be a movie or a television show with Asian characters, I would go out of my way to avoid them, because they portrayed all Asians as either ridiculously good or ridiculously bad; you know, the whole Charlie Chan-Fu Manchu thing.

By Anonym 17 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Only a man knows how a woman is supposed to act

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Henry Hwang

It's the stories that make my heart beat faster ...those are the ones to write about

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Henry Hwang

Consider it this way: what would you say if a blond homecoming queen fell in love with a short Japanese businessman? He treats her cruelly, then goes home for three years, during which time she prays to his picture and turns down marriage from a young Kennedy. Then, when she learns he has remarried, she kills herself. Now I believe you should consider this girl to be a deranged idiot, correct? But because it's an Oriental who kills herself for a Westerner–ah!–you find it beautiful.