Best 5 199 of History quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 18 Sep

Herman E. Kittredge

The death of Robert G. Ingersoll, on July 21, 1899, was one of the most widely -- noted events of that year in the civilized world. It was also one of the most widely and profoundly regretted, -- the most deeply deplored. Everywhere, the wisest knew (and the noblest felt) that the cause of humanity had met its greatest loss. To many thousands who realized the intellectual amplitude, the moral heroism and grandeur, the boundless generosity and sympathy, the tenderness and affection, of this incomparable man, his passing was as an intimate and bitter bereavement. Ingersoll was doubtless known, personally and otherwise, to more people than any other American who had not sat in the presidential chair; and, notwithstanding either the number or the wishes of his critics, his death probably brought genuine grief to more hearts than has that of any other individual in our history. Twice before, 'a Nation bowed and wept'; this time, a people.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Robert A. Orsi

The claim "oh, that's ancient history" is almost always a wish, am anxious attempt to put a boundary of time around some event that really is not over at all; it is a bid to silence the past.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Patience Johnson

In politics no permanent friends, no permanent enemies but permanent interest.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Robert J. Braathe

Make your hi story more powerful than your history.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Plato

The whole life of the philosopher is a preparation for death.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Will Rogers

A lot of guys have had a lot of fun joking about Henry Ford because he admitted one time that he didn't know history. He don't know it, but history will know him. He has made more history than his critics ever read.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Victor Hugo

I congratulate you," said he, in the tone which one uses for a reprimand. "You did not vote for the death of the king, after all." The old member of the Convention did not appear to notice the bitter meaning underlying the words "after all." He replied. The smile had quite disappeared from his face. "Do not congratulate me too much, sir. I did vote for the death of the tyrant." It was the tone of austerity answering the tone of severity. "What do you mean to say?" resumed the Bishop. "I mean to say that man has a tyrant,--ignorance. I voted for the death of that tyrant. That tyrant engendered royalty, which is authority falsely understood, while science is authority rightly understood. Man should be governed only by science." "And conscience," added the Bishop. "It is the same thing. Conscience is the quantity of innate science which we have within us.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ralph Waldo Emerson

A man finds room in the few square inches of the face for the traits of all his ancestors; for the expression of all his history, and his wants.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Leo Tolstoy

Happy people have no history.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Samuel Butler

Since God himself cannot change the past, He is obliged to tolerate the existence of historians.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Betty Friedan

The unpleasant image of the feminists today resembles less the feminists themselves than the image fostered by the interests who so bitterly opposed the vote for women...

By Anonym 19 Sep

Shirley Abbott

We all grow up with the weight of history on us. Our ancestors dwell in the attics of our brains as they do in the spiraling chains of knowledge hidden in every cell of our bodies.

By Anonym 15 Sep

S. M. Sigerson

A nation which fails to adequately remember salient points of its own history, is like a person with Alzheimer's. And that can be a social disease of a most destructive nature.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Lord Acton

To develop and perfect and arm conscience is the great achievement of history.

By Anonym 18 Sep

A. E. Samaan

Past is Prologue This book was written observing the premise that the seeds of Holocaust denial take root and prosper with misinformation. Clarity and transparency are imperative, as they leave no room for denial theories that would deprive the victims justice, or rob the living of a future. Generations of historians have enthusiastically gone about their craft knowing full well that 'he who owns the past, owns the future'. Improperly documented history, or more precisely, fraudulent versions of history not only deprive the victims of pasts injustices due recognition of their suffering, but also rob the living of a fair chance at a future free from the dangers of repeating past injustices.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Martin Heidegger

No historical movement can leap outside of history and start from scratch.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Jorge Luis Borges

Reality may be too complex for oral transmission; legend recreates it in a manner which is only accidentally false and which allows it to go about the world, from mouth to mouth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Clive Cussler

To those of you who seek lost objects of history, I wish you the best of luck. They're out there, and they're whispering.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Patience Johnson

Do you want to feel better or do you want to get well are two different things. Some people go to church to feel better but never get well. Some come to church for comfort and leave unchanged. And that is what sin represents. ..it is a place to be comfortable thereby feeling normal in your own disfunction.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Claudio Magris

Time is not a single train, moving in one direction at a constant speed. Every so often it meets another train coming in the opposite direction, from the past, and for a short while that past is with us, by our side, in our present.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ian Mcewan

Bernard was to remember this moment for the rest of his life. As they drank from their water bottles he was struck by the recently concluded war not as a historical, geopolitical fact but as a multiplicity, a near-infinity of private sorrows, as a boundless grief minutely subdivided without diminishment among individuals who covered the continent like dust, like spores whose separate identities would remain unknown, and whose totality showed more sadness than anyone could ever begin to comprehend; a weight borne in silence by hundreds of thousands, millions, like the woman in black for a husband and two brothers, each grief a particular, intricate, keening love story that might have been otherwise. It seemed as though he had never thought about the war before, not about its cost. He had been so busy with the details of his work, of doing it well, and his widest view had been of war aims, of winning, of statistical deaths, statistical destruction, and of post-war reconstruction. For the first time he sensed the scale of the catastrophe in terms of feeling; all those unique and solitary deaths, all that consequent sorrow, unique and solitary too, which had no place in conferences, headlines, history, and which had quietly retired to houses, kitchens, unshared beds, and anguished memories. This came upon Bernard by a pine tree in the Languedoc in 1946 not as an observation he could share with June but as a deep apprehension, a recognition of a truth that dismayed him into silence and, later, a question: what possible good could come of a Europe covered in this dust, these spores, when forgetting would be inhuman and dangerous, and remembering a constant torture?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Epicurus

The greater the Difficulty the more Glory in surmounting it, and the loss of false Joys secures to us a much better Possession of real ones.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Raul Zibechi

Sorun şu ki bizler gündelik hayatta, komşular, arkadaşlar, yoldaşlar veya aile fertleri arasındaki ilişkilerin sendikadaki, partideki ve hatta devletin kendi içindeki ilişkiler kadar önemli olduğunu anlamak istemiyoruz.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Ben Thompson

Since the dawn of time, nearly every man (and I'd wager to guess most women) has, at his most visceral level, secretly desired for one thing - to be standing triumphantly atop a heaping pile of his slain enemies, holding a gigantic axe aloft while some unbelievably attractive member of whatever gender he's attracted to desperately clutches his leg like it's the last life raft on the HMS Titanic.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Peter A. Lorge

Guns neither initiated nor enabled larger changes. Economic, political, and social development preceded and laid the foundation for the invention and use of the gun, not the other way around.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Stephen R. Bown

Before Lind's experiments, scurvy was not clearly defined as a disease.The term was used as a catchphrase to include all manner of nautical ailments.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Gillian Hovell

Discover how to visit the past and bring yesterday's stories into our lives today

By Anonym 15 Sep

Friedrich Nietzsche

The more abstract the truth you wish to teach, the more must you allure the senses to it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Julius Caesar

Our men must win or die. Pompey's men have... other options.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Niall Ferguson

The dead outnumber the living fourteen to one, and we ignore the accumulated experience of such a huge majority of mankind at our peril

By Anonym 13 Sep

Friedrich Nietzsche

Discontent is the seed of ethics.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Michael Krondl

Whereas once medieval Europe had adhered to a common Catholic religion, a common Latin language, and common well-spiced cuisine (at least, for the elite), the balkanization of the Christian world along national lines now meant that nations could no longer gather around the same table as easily as before. Even though it would take some years, the Europe-wide fashion for spices-as much as Latin-would be a casualty of Martin Luther's squabble with the bishop of Rome.

By Anonym 17 Sep

John Dewey

Mathematics is often cited as an example of purely normative thinking dependent upon a priori canons and supra-empirical material. But it is hard to see how the student who approaches the matter historically can avoid the conclusion that the status of mathematics is as empirical as metallurgy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

June Jordan

All of Western tradition, from the late bloom of the British Empire right through the early doom of Vietnam, dictates that you do something spectacular and irreversible whenever you find yourself in or whenever you impose yourself upon a wholly unfamiliar situation belonging to somebody else. Frequently it's your soul or your honor or your manhood, or democracy itself, at stake.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Zachary Taylor

For more than half a century... this Union has stood unshaken. Whatever dangers may threaten it, I shall stand by it and maintain it in its integrity to the full extent of the obligations imposed and the powers conferred upon me by the Constitution.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Philippa Gregory

Poor little girl. Poor little girl," Nan says, and at first I think she is speaking of the baby, perhaps it is a girl after all. But then I realize she is speaking of me, a girl of thirteen years, whose own mother has said that they can let her die as long as a son and heir is born.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Eric Hobsbawm

More history than ever is today being revised or invented by people who do not want the real past, but only a past that suits their purpose. Today is the great age of historical mythology. The defence of history by its professionals is today more urgent in politics than ever. We are needed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Patience Johnson

All the failures in my life freed me from all my fears so that I can succeed.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Arseen Ab

We are enemies, if we kneel to history. We are friends, if we make history kneels before us.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Tim Gunn

I love the word 'fashion.' That's why I'm using it in the title of this book. Fashion is about change and about creating clothes within a historical context. To me, dismissing fashion as silly or unimportant seems like a denial of history and frequently a show of sexism—as if something that's traditionally a concern of women isn't valid as a field of academic inquiry. When the Parsons fashion department was founded in 1906, it was called 'costume design,' because fashion was then a verb: to fashion. But the word 'fashion' has evolved to mean something much more profound, and those who resist it seem to me to be on the wrong side of history.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susan Sontag

The becoming of man is the history of the exhaustion of his possibilities.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Patience Johnson

God's perspectives requires persistence. To have God's perspective in the world we live in requires persistence.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Philippa Gregory

When he told me that he would fight forever, I knew that he would have to be defeated.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Rudolph Herzog

. Despite the considerable horror they had felt when the SA men were bellowing crude anti-Semitic slogans, in retrospect the joke-tellers were very much aware of the boycott’s inherent absurdity: A city on the Rhine during the boycott: SA men stand in front of Jewish businesses and “warn” passers-by against entering them. Nonetheless, a woman tries to go into a knitting shop. An SA man stops her and says, “Hey, you. Stay outside. That’s a Jewish shop!” “So?” replies the woman. “I’m Jewish myself.” The SA man pushes her back. “Anyone can say that!

By Anonym 14 Sep

John F Kennedy

It was involuntary. They sank my boat.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Gift Gugu Mona

When writing history, make sure it is well-penned; because life is not like a pencil, it has no eraser.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Benny Bellamacina

Going down in history is a dead end pursuit

By Anonym 15 Sep

Richard Brautigan

Donner Party Forsaken, fucking in the cold, eating each other, lost runny noses, complaining all the time like so many people that we know

By Anonym 16 Sep

Katherine

I die a Queen, but I would rather die the wife of Culpepper

By Anonym 16 Sep

Captain Hank Bracker

In the first twenty years after the War of Independence from the British, the percentage of black slaves in Virginia alone grew from 1% to 10% of the total population. The demand for free labor remained high in the South and the trading of slaves continued to flourish. From the 16th Century until the Civil War, it is estimated that a total of 12 million slaves were brought into America, of which two-thirds worked in the cotton industry under the harsh supervision of white overseers. For us today, it’s amazing that the Africans were thought of and treated as chattel, much the same as farm animals that just happened to be able to speak. The practice didn’t end until 1865, when the original eleven southern states that formed the Confederate States of America were defeated by the Union of Northern States.