Best 5 199 of History quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 14 Sep

Ulysses S. Grant

Quit thinking about what Bobby Lee's gonna do to us and start thinking about what we're going to do to him.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Hilary Mantel

If you help load a cart you get a ride in it, as often as not. It gives him to think, how bad people are at loading carts. Men trying to walk straight ahead through a narrow gateway with a wide wooden chest. A simple rotation of the object solves a great many problems.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Gregory Maguire

Your childhood," said Yackle coaxingly, as if she could smell his thoughts. As if she could sniff out those passages he hadn't chosen to retail at drink parties. Her words lulled him. The past, even a bitter past, is usually more pungent than the present, or at least better organized in the mind.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Lynne Tillman

Faced with the unfamiliar, we the public have been trained to rely on museums, like schools, to serve up art and culture like pieces of pie: little wedges of esthetics, criticism, politics and history.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John Vincent Palatine

An attentive observer of the drama that repeated itself every night might have spotted among the poor the gaunt figure of a pale, earnest young man, who, despite the easy sociability of Vienna's outcasts, wore his embitterment as if it were a precious decoration.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Katherine Ann Porter

It is my conviction that when events are forgotten, buried in the cellar of the page, they are no longer even history.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Priya Ardis

Vane’s lips tightened to suppress a smile. “Why so hostile, love?” “You whacked me on the head with a ball!” “You deserved it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

E. P. Thompson

At a certain point one ceases to defend a certain view of history; one must defend history itself.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Joan Tierney

I look through old photo albums and wish I could have met the woman that died so I could be born

By Anonym 13 Sep

George H. W. Bush

America is never wholly herself unless she is engaged in high moral principle. We as a people have such a purpose today. It is to make kinder the face of the nation and gentler the face of the world.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sanjai Velayudhan

If you don't make history, you just become history!

By Anonym 18 Sep

Stephen R. Brown

The Annual Register for 1763 tabulated the casualty list for British sailors in the Seven Years' War with France. Out of 184,899 men raised or rounded up for the war, 133, 708 died from disease, primarily scurvy, while only 1,512 were killed in action.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Zita Steele

I am a direct descendant of Adolf (sometimes spelled Adolph) Herrmann Lothar Gosling, born in Osnabrück, appointed Consul General in New York City for the Kingdom of Hanover by King George V of Hanover.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Patience Johnson

When you leave where God is sending you to somewhere else, your star will varnish. A lesson to learn here....don't go to Herod's house when you are looking for Jesus.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Butler

To live is like to love - all reason is against it, and all healthy instinct for it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

William R. Polk

Even if we, as northerners, choose to ignore this history, the victims’ descendants will not

By Anonym 17 Sep

Otto Bismarck

[N]icht durch Reden und Majoritätsbeschlüsse werden die großen Fragen der Zeit entschiedenen [...] sondern durch Eisen und Blut.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Rutherford B. Hayes

You know I am given to antiquarian and genealogical pursuits. An old family letter is a delight to my eyes. I can prowl in old trunks of letters by the day with undiminished zest.

By Anonym 13 Sep

June Jordan

All of Western tradition, from the late bloom of the British Empire right through the early doom of Vietnam, dictates that you do something spectacular and irreversible whenever you find yourself in or whenever you impose yourself upon a wholly unfamiliar situation belonging to somebody else. Frequently it's your soul or your honor or your manhood, or democracy itself, at stake.

By Anonym 16 Sep

John Pilger

I love long regarded my country as a secret, as a land half-won, its story half-told. It was as if the past was another country, mysterious and unexplained. 'Australian history' either was not taught or was not required for 'higher learning'. Contemporary history was unheard of. Black history was ridiculed. Historians and politicians, more concerned with imperial propriety than truth, covered up and distorted.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kate Harris

But when Polo travelled through the South Caucasus in the thirteenth century, he visited Silk Road territories long since vanished or metamorphosed, such as Lesser and Greater Hermenia, Turcomania, Georgiana, and Zorzania. 'Names are only the guests of reality,' the Chinese sage Hsu Yu noted in 2300 BCE, suggesting that borders are little more than collective myths--fictions that a certain number of people, for a certain period of time, believe are fact.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Erich Fromm

The danger of the past was that men became slaves. The danger of the future is that men may become robots.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Patience Johnson

Do you want to acquire God's own wisdom? Relate with the Holy Spirit. Be a seeker of divine guidance by the Holy Spirit. You can't be a man or woman of solution without God.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Lailah Gifty Akita

There are many books, but One holy book, the HOLY BIBLE.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Captain Hank Bracker

The Hudson Burlesque Of all the theaters I miss from that era, the Hudson Theatre tops the list. It was built in what was then called Union Hill, early in December 1907. We called it the Hudson Burlesque, and it featured striptease artists such as Lili St. Cyr, Gypsy Rose Lee and Tempest Storm. Being too young to get into the theatre on my own, I usually offered an adult standing in line some money to take me in. Once inside, I would head for the front of the theatre to the fire exit on the right side of the orchestra seating. It was all prearranged with my friends waiting outside! With one kick, the door would open, allowing them to come streaming in. There were not enough ushers to catch us all, so some of us would invariably be caught and evicted, only to try to gain access again. It was all great fun! “I don't think there is such a thing as being too raunchy when it comes to the art form of burlesque.” Christina Aguilera, American singer-songwriter and actress. From the upcoming book “Seawater One.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Seth Garfield

History matters, not because it repeats itself (which it never does), but because its narration can rid demons that torment the oppressed, shock the complacent and intransigent into self-reflection, and inspire feats of human perseverance and will.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Graham Hancock

Indian thought has traditionally regarded history and prehistory in cyclical rather than linear terms. In the West time is an arrow -- we are born, we live, we die. But in India we die only to be reborn. Indeed, it is a deeply rooted idea in Indian spiritual traditions that the earth itself and all living creatures upon it are locked into an immense cosmic cycle of birth, growth, fruition, death, rebirth and renewal. Even temples are reborn after they grow too old to be used safely -- through the simple expedient of reconstruction on the same site. Within this pattern of spiralling cycles, where everything that goes around comes around, India conceives of four great epochs of 'world ages' of varying but enormous lengths: the Krita Yuga, the Treta Yuga, the Davapara Yuga and the Kali Yuga. At the end of each yuga a cataclysm, known as pralaya, engulfs the globe in fire or flood. Then from the ruins of the former age, like the Phoenix emerging from the ashes, the new age begins.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Emil Cioran

The sense that everything is going wrong has existed in every era, and rightly so since men have found no greater pleasure than in inventing new ways to make each other miserable.

By Anonym 17 Sep

John Holt

Much of what we call History is the success stories of madmen.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Paul Beatty

Objection! This defendant, evil genius that he is, has through his abhorrent actions managed to racially discriminate against every race all at the same time, to say nothing of his unabashed slaveholding. The state of California feels that it has more than enough evidence to prove that the defendant is in abject violation of the Civil Rights Acts of 1866, 1871, 1957, 1964 and 1968, the Equal Rights Act of 1963, the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments, and at least six of the goddamn Ten Commandments.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Patience Johnson

Unless you acknowledge your vulnerability for sin, you won’t pray against it and you’ll end up experiencing defeat. The most effective weapon the enemy has against you - is you

By Anonym 19 Sep

Edmund Campion

We human beings are story-tellers, we pass on our values through the stories we tell. This is particularly true of Catholics, who get their identity through their histories, which they see as salvation history linking them to the saving actions of Christ. So, for Catholics, doing history – passing on the values by telling stories – is a pastoral imperative. We must look where we have been in order to know where we are going.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Joshua Greenberg

If you write a post and put it on a blog, that's a historical document. If you change your template, then that entry looks completely different. It's the same words, but not the same meaning. This all depends on what historical questions that people will be asking and we can't know what they will want.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Laurence Overmire

Through the various branches of your tree, you are connected to the entirety of human history. When we talk about the ancient Egyptians building the pyramids, we're not talking about a bunch of exotic strangers, we're talking about our great-great-many-times-great grandparents!

By Anonym 18 Sep

Terry Eagleton

Successful revolutions are those which end up by erasing all traces of themselves.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Sanjai Velayudhan

It is only a woman who can make a man feel like a 'superhero' or 'inadequate'. Its her attention and admiration that a man desperately seeks!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Philibert Orry

I have been blind expecting everything to stay the same.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Ralph Inge

The object of studying philosophy is to know one's own mind, not other peoples.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kent Nerburn

Our old people noticed this from the beginning. They said that the white man lived in a world of cages, and that if we didn't look out, they would make us live in cages too. So we started noticing. Everything looked like cages. Your clothes fit like cages. Your houses looked like cages. You put your fences around your yards so they looked like cages. Everything was a cage. You turned the land into cages. Little squares. Then after you had all these cages you made a government to protect these cages. And that government was all cages. All laws about what you couldn't do. The only freedom you had was inside your own cage. Then you wondered why you weren't happy and didn't feel free. You made all the cages, the you wondered why you didn't feel free.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Edward Royle

Logically, this kind of atheism did not prove that there was no God.... On the contrary, Southwell was typical in placing the onus probandi on those who affirmed the existence of God and Holyoake regarded himself as an atheist only in his inability to believe what the churches would have him believe. They were content to show that the Christian concept of the supernatural was meaningless, that the arguments in its favor were illogical, and that the mysteries of the universe, insofar as they were explicable, could be accounted for in material terms.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susan Dennard

...for history is all too easily rewritten and the past is all to easily erased.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Laura Ingalls Wilder

There was no time to lose, no time to waste in rest or play. The life of the earth comes up with a rush in the springtime.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Elizabeth Kostova

Looking back at that moment, I understand that I had lived in books so long, in my narrow university setting, that I had become compressed by them internally. Suddenly, in this echoing house of Byzantium-one of the wonders of history-my spirit leaped out of its confines. I knew in that instant that, whatever happened, I could never go back to my old constraints. I wanted to follow life upward, to expand with it outward, the way this enormous interior swelled upward and outward. My heart swelled with it...

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susan Freinkel

An editorial in the Los Angeles Times [1923] wistfully asked, 'Will eating chestnuts by crackling log fires become one of the lost arts preserved by a devoted people only in poetry and romance?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kenzaburo Oe

We naturally try to forget our personal tragedies, serious or trifling, as soon as possible (even something as petty as being scorned or disdained by a stranger on a street corner). We try not to carry these things over to tomorrow. It is not strange, therefore, that the whole human race is trying to put Hiroshima, the extreme point of human tragedy, completely out of mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Patience Johnson

All my pains has always increased my sense of purpose.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Christopher L. Bennett

The best we can do is take the history we have and deal with it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Savo Heleta

I realize that what happened in Bosnia could happen anywhere in the world, particularly in places that are diverse and have a history of conflict. It only takes bad leadership for a country to go up in flames, for people of different ethnicity, color, or religion to kill each other as if they had nothing in common whatsoever. Having a democratic constitution, laws that secure human rights, police that maintain order, a judicial system, and freedom of speech don't ultimately guarantee long lasting peace. If greedy or bloodthirsty leaders come to power, it can all go down. It happened to us. It can happen to you.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Wilhelm Reich

It was one of the greatest errors in evaluating dictatorship to say that the dictator forces himself on society against its own will. In reality, every dictator in history was nothing but the accentuation of already existing state ideas which he had only to exaggerate in order to gain power

By Anonym 19 Sep

Noel Sheehy

The philosopher and historian George Santayana once remarked that those who do not know their history are doomed to repeat its mistakes. A perusal of some of the essays will reveal that this is not always true. In some cases psychologists have known about mistakes of the past and sought to repeat them. But the recurrence can sometimes be fruitful: going round in circles can be a good thing, provided the circle is large that when one returns to the task one sees it in a new light and the error brings new insights.