Best 4 504 of Technology quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 15 Sep

Angela Braly

The weekends are really important to me; the use of technology is really important to me.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Steve Jobs

You've got to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology. You can't start with the technology and try to figure out where you're going to sell it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Terry Crews

Our strategic evolution has established Monsanto as the leading innovator in agricultural seeds and technology, .. The financial discipline we have exercised has also allowed us to establish a solid foundation which is poised for growth in the years ahead.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Robert Jarvik

As a medical doctor who chose a career in artificial heart technology rather than clinical practice, I decided not to take an internship, which is required for licensing. Instead, I work with invention, manufacturing, regulatory affairs, and clinical application of artificial hearts.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Tomm Moore

Technology is the friend of traditional animation. It doesn't have to replace it. It can help you do it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Rashida Jones

There's a sense of entitlement and isolationism that I think is really dangerous, and the way globalization and technology have been used isn't really for the best.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Ralph Merkle

A potato can grow quite easily on a very small plot of land. With molecular manufacturing, we'll be able to have distributed manufacturing, which will permit manufacturing at the site using technologies that are low-cost and easily available.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Samuel Florman

There is scarcely a technical issue for which you cannot find expert witnesses of differing opinions.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ken Goldstein

Contemporary taste is fickle. Technology trends are more fickle. Customer loyalty is most fickle.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Kenneth G. Wilson

While at Cal Tech I talked a lot with Jon Mathews, then a junior faculty member; he taught me how to use the Institute's computer; we also went on hikes together.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Arnold Schwarzenegger

I embrace technology and I just think that in 1984 when James Cameron wrote about the technology, everyone thought he was totally way out there and it was science fiction. Now it's almost reality what he talked about. The machines have taken over, except they have not become self-aware, like in Terminator. So this is really one thing that we have to watch out for, but I think technology is good.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Peter Drucker

Innovation requires us to systematically identify changes that have already occurred in a business - in demographics, in values, in technology or science - and then to look at them as opportunities. It also requires something that is most difficult for existing companies to do: to abandon rather than defend yesterday.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Kim J. Vicente

It bears emphasizing: our traditional ways of thinking have ignored - and virtually made invisible - the relationship between people and technology.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kevin B. Rollins

Intel's still our main partner. We have not announced anything with AMD and don't have anything planned, but we're constantly being aware to make sure our customers get the best technology.

By Anonym 15 Sep

John F Kennedy

The success of this Government, and thus the success of our Nation, depends in the last analysis upon the quality.of our career services. The legislation enacted by the Congress, as well as the decisions made by me and by the department and agency heads, must all be implemented by the career men and women in the Federal service. In foreign affairs, national defense, science and technology, and a host of other fields, they face problems of unprecedented importance and perplexity. We are all dependent on their sense of loyalty and responsibility as well as their competence and energy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

David Blumenthal

Information is the lifeblood of medicine and health information technology is destined to be the circulatory system for that information.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Evgeny Morozov

Is there anything more self-defeating than using technology to free up your time - so that you can learn how to do an even better job at it?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Rodney Brooks

If we are machines, then in principle at least, we should be able to build machines out of other stuff, which are just as alive as we are.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Jennifer Stone

As the medieval mind blamed God for human suffering, so the modern mind blames 'the system' for the industrial blight and plague of technology.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Hiroshi Sugimoto

We need to have nature back in our atmosphere. There might be a turning point of going backward - within a few thousand years we are going back to the Stone Age! There are many scenarios [with] the robot technologies: Humans no longer need to walk; machines can produce products and food and everything. You might not be able to recognize what's false and what is real.

By Anonym 15 Sep

L. Ashley Straker

But the things in the batteries couldn't be spiders. It just wasn't possible. There had to be another explanation. But of what kind?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Diane Sawyer

Every time somebody tries to go in and reinvent what we do, it always ends up being more about technology and sets, and flash and dash, forgetting the main thing, which is interesting people saying interesting, important things.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Valerie Steele

I think that a lot of our fashion history shows do touch on important issues. Fashion and Technology obviously does, because technology is impacting fashion in so many ways, from computer-assisted design to the way we actually purchase clothes online.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

Technology is good, but we must never place technology above humanity - the day we do, will be the day we fall. And perhaps, we have already started to fall!

By Anonym 16 Sep

Neil Postman

For no medium is excessively dangerous if its users understand what its dangers are. It is not important that those who ask the questions arrive at my answers or Marshall McLuhan's (quite different answers, by the way). This is an instance in which the asking of the questions is sufficient. To ask is to break the spell.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Wesley Clark

Serious research and development efforts are required to produce technologies, strategies, organizations, and trained personnel who can go into failed states, work with our allies and friends, and promote the political and economic reforms that will meet popular needs and reduce the sources of terrorism and conflict.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Fred Rogers

Children long to know that they are lovable. And there are ways that technology can help with that. But ultimately it's their relationships with their parents, their grandparents, their peers, and their teachers that help them to know that for sure. A child can learn the word "hug" and the letters h-u-g through a computer, but a computer can never give the child a hug.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Howard Rheingold

Whenever a technology enables people to organize at a pace that wasn't before possible, new kinds of politics emerge.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles M. Vest

Agency by agency, we frequently have lost a bit of ground, at least to inflation-but had it not been for the efforts we've made to educate people about the importance of science, technology and advanced education, those predictions very well might have come true.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Kay Koplovitz

Great opportunity for technology/media companies to meet the movers and shakers in the broadcast and media industries.

By Anonym 19 Sep

George Orwell

To begin with, there is the frightful debauchery of taste that has already been effected by a century of mechanisation. This is almost too obvious and too generally admitted to need pointing out. But as a single instance, take taste in its narrowest sense - the taste for decent food. In the highly mechanical countries, thanks to tinned food, cold storage, synthetic flavouring matters, etc., the palate it almost a dead organ. As you can see by looking at any greengrocer’s shop, what the majority of English people mean by an apple is a lump of highly-coloured cotton wool from America or Australia; they will devour these things, apparently with pleasure, and let the English apples rot under the trees. It is the shiny, standardized, machine-made look of the American apple that appeals to them; the superior taste of the English apple is something they simply do not notice. Or look at the factory-made, foil wrapped cheeses and ‘blended’ butter in an grocer’s; look at the hideous rows of tins which usurp more and more of the space in any food-shop, even a dairy; look at a sixpenny Swiss roll or a twopenny ice-cream; look at the filthy chemical by-product that people will pour down their throats under the name of beer. Wherever you look you will see some slick machine-made article triumphing over the old-fashioned article that still tastes of something other than sawdust. And what applies to food applies also to furniture, houses, clothes, books, amusements and everything else that makes up our environment. These are now millions of people, and they are increasing every year, to whom the blaring of a radio is not only a more acceptable but a more normal background to their thoughts than the lowing of cattle or the song of birds. The mechanisation of the world could never proceed very far while taste, even the taste-buds of the tongue, remained uncorrupted, because in that case most of the products of the machine would be simply unwanted. In a healthy world there would be no demand for tinned food, aspirins, gramophones, gas-pipe chairs, machine guns, daily newspapers, telephones, motor-cars, etc. etc.; and on the other hand there would be a constant demand for the things the machine cannot produce. But meanwhile the machine is here, and its corrupting effects are almost irresistible. One inveighs against it, but one goes on using it. Even a bare-arse savage, given the change, will learn the vices of civilisation within a few months. Mechanisation leads to the decay of taste, the decay of taste leads to demand for machine-made articles and hence to more mechanisation, and so a vicious circle is established.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Aldous Huxley

[...] Technology has tended to devaluate the traditional vision-inducing materials. The illumination of a city, for example, was once a rare event, reserved for victories and national holidays, for the canonization of saints and the crowning of kings. Now it occurs nightly and celebrates the virtues of gin, cigarettes and toothpaste.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Pope Benedict Xvi

Young people in particular, I appeal to you: bear witness to your faith through the digital world!....Employ these new technologies to make the Gospel known, so that the Good News of God's infinite love for all people, will resound in new ways across our increasingly technological world!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Lennart Nilsson

I have the instruments, ideas, technology, computer techniques. We try to create or see something, which has not been known before - just to discover something together. This is always my dream.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kirkpatrick Sale

That is certainly the point: when the human species was born, on the African savanna, life was pretty good; we could live in harmony with the rest of nature, and that's what I've been calling Eden. The only technologies that humans devised for some 2 million years were fire and the hand ax. That's all. Eden didn't need anything more

By Anonym 14 Sep

Jeff Cohen

The demand for digital textbooks has increased since its introduction to the marketplace. As students become more familiar with them and computers get faster, larger and more portable, this product will gain in popularity.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Philip Pullman

The book is second only to the wheel as the best piece of technology human beings have ever invented. A book symbolises the whole intellectual history of mankind; it's the greatest weapon ever devised in the war against stupidity.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Douglas Rushkoff

So which is more probable: That today's atheist apocalyptans are unique and right? Or that they are like their many predecessors—at the very least, in their motivations? If anything, the vehemence with which the believers in emergent complexity debunk all religion may betray their own creeping awareness of the religious underpinnings and precedents for their declarations. In fact, the concept of Armageddon first emerged in response to the invention of monotheism by the ancient Persian priest Zoroaster, around the tenth or eleventh century BCE. Until that time, the dominant religions maintained a pantheon of gods reigning in a cyclical precession along with the heavens, so there was little need for absolutes. As religions began focusing on a single god, things got a bit trickier. For if there is only one god, and that god has absolute power, then why do bad things happen? Why does evil still exist? If one's god is fighting for control of the universe against the gods of other people, then there's no problem. Just as in polytheism, the great achievements of one god can be undermined by the destructive acts of another. But what if a religion, such as Judaism of the First and Second Temple era, calls for one god and one god alone? How do its priests and followers explain the persistence of evil and suffering? They do it the same way Zoroaster did: by introducing time into the equation. The imperfection of the universe is a product of its incompleteness. There's only one true god, but he's not done yet. In the monotheist version, the precession of the gods was no longer a continuous cycle of seasonal deities or metaphors. It was nor a linear story with a clear endpoint in the victory of the one true and literal god. Once this happens, time can end. Creation is the Alpha, and the Return is the Omega. It's all good. This worked well enough to assuage the anxieties of both the civilization of the calendar and that of the clock. But what about us? Without time, without a future, how to we contend with the lingering imperfections in our reality? As members of a monotheist culture—however reluctant—we can't help but seek to apply its foundational framework to our current dilemma. The less aware we are of this process—or the more we refuse to admit its legacy in our construction of new models—the more vulnerable we become to its excesses. Repression and extremism are two sides of the same coin. In spite of their determination to avoid such constructs, even the most scientifically minded futurists apply the Alpha-Omega framework of messianic time to their upgraded apocalypse narratives. Emergence takes the place of the hand of God, mysteriously transforming a chaotic system into a self-organized one, with coherence and cooperation. Nobody seems able to explain how this actually happens.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Henry Mosquera

Out in the field, any connection with home just makes you weaker. It reminds you that you were once civilized, soft; and that can get you killed faster than a bullet through the head.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Vernor Vinge

I have argued above that we cannot prevent the Singularity, that its coming is an inevitable consequence of the humans natural competitiveness and the possibilities inherent in technology.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Babbage

The economy of human time is the next advantage of machinery in manufactures.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Asa Don Brown

There are no restrictions or barriers for preventing someone from becoming an addict to a technological device.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Stephen Schneider

The dramatic importance of climate changes to the world’s future has been dangerously underestimated by many, often because we have been lulled by modern technology into thinking we have conquered nature. This well-written book points out in clear language that the climatic threat could be as awesome as any we might face, and that massive world-wide actions to hedge against that threat deserve immediate consideration.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Fuad Alakbarov

Crazy how so many British people can walk into Tesco, see 30 self-service checkouts, and still believe that it's immigrants who are taking all the jobs.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Mark Goddard

Life is about family and technology.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Koch

What hermeneutics teaches is that progress comes from being exposed to different points of views because there's no point of view that is right for all situations and all times. And even if it's superior to the others, you can enrich it by drawing on others or thinking: "Why is that wrong and how do I improve my approach? How do I come up with a better approach?" So that's essential for innovation just like it is in technology.

By Anonym 14 Sep

David Coleman

Tech executives have historically been owners of significant portions of their companies' stock so there is a propensity for them to diversify as a rule.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Damien Fahey

My life is now a constant assessment of whether what's happening in real life is more entertaining than what's happening on my phone.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Simone Puorto

The extreme competitiveness in travel is slowly bringing search engines, OTAs and metasearch engines to converge towards an increasingly homogeneous model. The reason is simple, almost Darwinian: the model that will prove to be the most efficient in terms of scalability and efficiency for the end user is going to prevail.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Don Delillo

Spy planes, drone aircraft, satellites with cameras that can see from three hundred miles what you can see from a hundred feet. They see and they hear. Like ancient monks, you know, who recorded knowledge, wrote it painstakingly down. These systems collect and process. All the secret knowledge of the world.