Best 383 of Louisa May Alcott quotes - MyQuotes

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Louisa May Alcott
By Anonym 20 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

You do me proud, Captain. But, dear, I want to say one thing and then I'm done; for you don't need much advice of mine after my good man has spoken. I read somewhere that every inch of rope in the British Navy has a strand of red in it, so wherever a bit of it is found it is known. That is the text of my little sermon to you. Virtue, which means honour, honesty, courage, and all that makes character, is the red thread that marks a good man wherever he is. Keep that always and everywhere, so that even if wrecked by misfortune, that sign shall still be found and recognized. Yours is a rough life, and your mates not all we could wish, but you can be a gentleman in the true sense of the word; and no matter what happens to your body, keep your soul clean, your heart true to those who love you, and do your duty to the end.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

She fell into the moody, miserable state of mind which often comes when strong wills have to yield to the inevitable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

The duty we owe ourselves is greater than that we owe others.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

My little girl, I would face a dozen storms far worse than this to keep your soul as stainless as snow; for it is the small temptations which undermine integrity, unless we watch and pray, and never think them too trivial to be resisted.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Poor Buttercup was not in a very good mood; for she had been lately bereft of her calf, and mourned for the little thing most dismally. Just now she regarded all mankind as her enemies (and I do not blame her), so when the matadore came prancing towards her with the red handkerchief flying at the end of his long lance, she threw up her head, and gave a most appropriate "Moo!".

By Anonym 19 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

They always looked back before turning the corner, for their mother was always at the window to nod and smile, and wave her hand to them. Somehow it seemed as if they couldn't have got through the day without that, for whatever their mood might be, the last glimpse of that motherly face was sure to affect them like sunshine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

People cannot be molded like clay.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

The scar will remain, but it is better for a man to lose both arms than his soul; and these hard years, instead of being lost, may be made the most precious of your lives, if they teach you to rule yourselves.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

To marry without love betrays as surely as to love without marriage.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Laurie, you’re an angel! How shall I ever thank you?” ”Fly at me again; I rather like it,” said Laurie, looking mischievous, a thing he had not done for a fortnight.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

{Mrs. March to Jo} You are too much alike and too fond of freedom, not to mention hot tempers and strong wills, to get on happily together, in a relation which needs infinite patience and forbearance, as well as love.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

This suited the young lady better than twilight confidences, tender pressures of the hand, and eloquent glances of the eye, for with Jo, brain developed earlier than heart, and she preferred imaginary heroes to real ones, because when tired of them, the former could be shut up in the tin kitchen till called for, and the latter were less manageable.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Her beauty satisfied [his] artistic eye, her peculiarities piqued his curiosity, her vivacity lightened his ennui, and her character interested him by the unconscious hints it gave of power, pride and passion. So entirely natural and unconventional was she that he soon found himself on a familiar footing, asking all manner of unusual questions, and receiving rather piquant replies.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

I want to do something splendid before I go into my castle--something heroic, or wonderful--that won't be forgotten after I'm dead. I don't know what, but I'm on the watch for it, and mean to astonish you all, some day. I think I shall write books, and get rich and famous; that would suit me, so that is my favorite dream.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

It's lovely to see people so happy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

…for no matter how lost and soiled and worn-out wandering sons may be, mothers can forgive and forget every thing as they fold them into their fostering arms. Happy the son whose faith in his mother remains unchanged, and who, through all his wanderings, has kept some filial token to repay her brave and tender love.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Boys don't gush, so I can stand it. The last time I let in a party of girls, one fell into my arms and said, "Darling, love me!" I wanted to shake her,' answered Mrs. Jo, wiping her pen with energy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Rome took all the vanity out of me; for after seeing the wonders there, I felt too insignificant to live, and gave up all my foolish hopes in despair.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

It does seem as if the more one gets the more one wants

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

. . . children should draw [a husband & wife] nearer than ever, not separate you, as if they were all yours, and [your husband] had nothing to do but support them. . . . don't neglect husaband for children, don't shut him out of the nursery, but teach him how to help in it. His place is there as well as yours, and the children need him; let him feel that he has his part to do, and he will do it gladly and faithfully, and it will be better for you all. . . . That is the secret of our home happiness: he does not let business wean him from the little cares and duties that affect us all, and I try not to let domestic worries destroy my interest in his pursuits. Each do our part alone in many things, but at home we work together, always. . . . no time is so beautiful and precious to parents as the first years of the little lives given them to train. Don't let [your husband] be a stranger to the babies, for they will do more to keep him safe and happy in this world of trial and temptation than anything else, and through them you will learn to know and love one another as you should.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

We'll all grow up someday, Meg, we might as well know what we want. ~Amy March~

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Dolls are safe companions.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

If you feel your value lies in being merely decorative, I fear that someday you might find yourself believing that’s all that you really are. Time erodes all such beauty, but what it cannot diminish is the wonderful workings of your mind: Your humor, your kindness, and your moral courage. These are the things I cherish so in you. I so wish I could give my girls a more just world. But I know you’ll make it a better place. - Marmee

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

November is the most disagreeable month in the whole year.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Life is my university, and I hope to graduate from it with some distinction.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Mrs. Jo did not mean the measles, but that more serious malady called love, which is apt to ravage communities, spring and autumn, when winter gayety and summer idleness produce whole bouquets of engagements, and set young people to pairing off like the birds.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Aunt March is a regular samphire, is she not?' observed Amy, tasting her mixture critically. `She means vampire, not seaweed, but it doesn't matter. It's too warm to be particular about one's parts of speech, ' murmured Jo.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Self-pity in its early stages is as snug as a feather mattress. Only when it hardens does it become uncomfortable.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

I am angry nearly every day of my life, but I have learned not to show it; and I still try to hope not to feel it, though it may take me another forty years to do it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

I find it poor logic to say that because women are good, women should vote. Men do not vote because they are good; they vote because they are male, and women should vote, not because we are angels and men are animals, but because we are human beings and citizens of this country.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

...Meg learned to love her husband better for his poverty, because it seem to have made a man of him, giving him the strength and courage to fight his own way, and taught him a tender patience with which to bear and comfort the natural longings and failures of those he loved.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

There can't be too much charity!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Now we are expected to be as wise as men who have had generations of all the help there is, and we scarcely anything.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

She had a womanly instinct that clothes possess an influence more powerful over many than the worth of character or the magic of manners.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Girls could do most things as well as boys, and some things better.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

... swept into the giddy vortex which keeps so many young people revolving aimlessly, till they go down or are cast upon the shore, wrecks of what they might have been

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

…having learned that people cannot be moulded like clay…

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Now I'm beginning to live a little and feel less like a sick oyster at low tide.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

A kiss for a blow is always best, though it's not very easy to give it sometimes.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Human minds are more full of mysteries than any written book and more changeable than the cloud shapes in the air.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

A faithful friend is a strong defense; And he that hath found him hath found a treasure.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Wouldn't it be fun if all the castles in the air which we make could come true and we could live in them?

By Anonym 19 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Then it was that Jo, living in the darkened room, with that suffering little sister always before her eyes and that pathetic voice sounding in her ears, learned to see the beauty and the sweetness of Beth's nature, to feel how deep and tender a place she filled in all hearts, and to acknowledge the worth of Beth's unselfish ambition to live for others, and make home happy by that exercise of those simple virtues which all may possess, and which all should love and value more than talent, wealth, or beauty.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

You have a good many little gifts and virtues, but there is no need of parading them, for conceit spoils the finest genius. There is not much danger that real talent or goodness will be overlooked long, and the great charm of all power is modesty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

All is fish that comes to the literary net. Goethe puts his joys and sorrows into poems, I turn my adventures into bread and butter.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Good books, like good friends, are few and chosen; the more select, the more enjoyable.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Rivalry adds so much to the charms of one's conquests.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

Don't take it away! It's only a fancy, but a man must love something…

By Anonym 13 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

…in silence learned the sweet solace which affection administers to sorrow.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Louisa May Alcott

I don't believe fine young ladies enjoy themselves a bit more than we do, in spite of our burned hair, old gowns, one glove apiece, and tight slippers that sprain our ankles when we are silly enough to wear them.