Best 587 of W. Somerset Maugham quotes - MyQuotes

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W. Somerset Maugham
By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The average American can get into the kingdom of heaven much more easily than he can get into the Boulevard St. Germain.

By Anonym 16 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I've been quite happy. Look, here are my proofs. Remember that I am indifferent to discomforts which would harass other folk. What do the circumstances of life matter if your dreams make you lord paramount of time and space?

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

We are not the same persons this year as last; nor are those we love. It is a happy chance if we, changing, continue to love a changed person.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Art for art's sake makes no more sense than gin for gin's sake.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The artist produces for the liberation of his soul.

By Anonym 18 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The best I can suggest is that when the Absolute manifested itself in the world evil was the natural correlation of good. You could never have had the stupendous beauty of the Himalayas without the unimaginable horror of a convulsion of the earth's crust. The Chinese craftsman who makes a vase in what they call eggshell porcelain can give it a lovely shape, ornament it with a beautiful design, stain it a ravishing colour and give it a perfect glaze, but from its very nature he can't make it anything but fragile. If you drop in on the floor it will break into a dozen fragments. Isn't possible in the same way that the values we cherish in the world can only exist in combination with evil?

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The rain fell alike upon the just and upon the unjust, and for nothing was there a why and a wherefore.

By Anonym 18 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Sir Walter Raleigh is more safely enshrined in the memory of mankind because he set his cloak for the Virgin Queen to walk on than because he carried the english name to undiscovered countries.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Are you sure you can prevent yourself from falling in love one of these days? Such things do happen, you know, even to the most prudent men.' Simon gave him a strange, one might even have thought a hostile, look. I should tear it out of my heart as I'd wrench out of my mouth a rotten tooth.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I do not think you want too much sincerity in society. It would be like an iron girder in a house of cards.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

There are directors who desire to be artistic. It is pathetic to compare the seriousness of their aim with the absurdity of their attainment.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The highest activities of consciousness have their origins in physical occurrences of the brain, just as the loveliest melodies are not too sublime to be expressed by notes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Act so that every action of yours should be capable of becoming an universal rule of action for all men.

By Anonym 18 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Philip thought of the countless millions to whom life is no more than unending labour, neither beautiful nor ugly, but just to be accepted in the same spirit as one accepts the changes of the seasons. Fury seized him because it all seemed useless. He could not reconcile himself to the belief that life had no meaning and yet everything he saw, all his thoughts, added to the force of his conviction. But though fury seized him it was a joyful fury. life was not so horrible if it was meaningless, and he faced it with a strange sense of power

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The passing moment is all we can be sure of; it is only common sense to extract its utmost value from it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

She had no mercy. He looked at her neck and thought how he would like to jab it with the knife he had for his muffin. He knew enough anatomy to make pretty certain of getting the carotid artery. And at the same time he wanted to cover her pale, thin face with kisses.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The crown of literature is poetry.

By Anonym 20 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

You cannot write unless you write much.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I'm not only my spirit buy my body, and who can decide how much I, my individual self, am conditioned by the accident of my body? Would Byron have been Byron but for his club foot, or Dostoyevsky Dostoyevsky without his epilepsy?

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

It is dangerous to let the public behind the scenes. They are easily disillusioned and then they are angry with you, for it was the illusion they loved.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The audience is not the least important actor in the play and if it will not do its allotted share the play falls to pieces.

By Anonym 16 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

It looked as though you did not act in a certain way because you thought in a certain way, but rather that you thought in a certain way because you were made in a certain way. Truth had nothing to do with it. There was no such thing as truth. Each man was his own philosopher (...). " The thing then was to discover what one was and one's system of philosophy would devise itself. It seems to Philip that there were three things to find out: man's relation to the world he lives in, man's relation to the men among whom he lives, and finally man's relation to himself.

By Anonym 18 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The feeling of apartness from others comes to most with puberty, but it is not always developed to such a degree as to make the difference between the individual and his fellows noticeable to the individual. It is such as he, as little conscious of himself as the bee in a hive, who are the lucky in life, for they have the best chance of happiness: their activities are shared by all, and their pleasures are only pleasures because they are enjoyed in common; you will see them on Whit-Monday dancing on Hampstead Heath, shouting at a football match, or from club windows in Pall Mall cheering a royal procession. It is because of them that man has been called a social animal.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Often the best way to overcome desire is to satisfy it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Did you really cease to love a person because you had been treated cruelly?

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

The ideas for stories that thronged my brain would not let me rest till I had got rid of them by writing them.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Let us develop the resources of our land, call forth its powers, build up its institutions, promote all its great interests, and see whether we also, in our day and generation, may not perform something worthy to be remembered.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

If a nation values anything more than freedom, it will lose its freedom; and the irony of it is that if it is comfort or money that it values more, it will lose that too.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Benevolence is often very peremptory.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

To bear failure with courage is the best proof of character that anyone can give... You will find that people forget the failures of others very quickly.... My last piece of advice is not to let anyone see your mortification, but whatever you fancy people are saying about you to go on with your ordinary life as though nothing unpleasant had happened to you.

By Anonym 16 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

For myself I can say that, having had every good thing that money can buy, an experience like another, I could part without a pang with every possession I have. We live in uncertain times and our all may yet be taken from us. With enough plain food to satisfy my small appetite, a room to myself, books from a public library, pens and paper, I should regret nothing.

By Anonym 16 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

It was a sordid scene. Philip leaned over the rail, staring down, and he ceased to hear the music. They danced furiously. They danced round the room, slowly, talking very little, with all their attention given to the dance. The room was hot, and their faces shone with sweat. It seemed to Philip that they had thrown off the guard which people wear on their expression, the homage to convention, and he saw them now as they really were. In that moment of abandon they were strangely animal: some were foxy and some were wolflike; and others had the long, foolish face of sheep. Their skins were sallow from the unhealthy life the led and the poor food they ate. Their features were blunted by mean interests, and their little eyes were shifty and cunning. There was nothing of nobility in their bearing, and you felt that for all of them life was a long succession of petty concerns and sordid thoughts. The air was heavy with the musty smell of humanity. But they danced furiously as though impelled by some strange power within them, and it seemed to Philip that they were driven forward by a rage for enjoyment. They were seeking desperately to escape from a world of horror. The desire for pleasure which Cronshaw said was the only motive of human action urged them blindly on, and the very vehemence of the desire seemed to rob it of all pleasure. The were hurried on by a great wind, helplessly, they knew not why and they knew not whither. Fate seemed to tower above them, and they danced as though everlasting darkness were beneath their feet. Their silence was vaguely alarming. It was as if life terrified them and robbed them of power of speech so that the shriek which was in their hearts died at their throats. Their eyes were haggard and grim; and notwithstanding the beastly lust that disfigured them, and the meanness of their faces, and the cruelty, notwithstanding the stupidness which was the worst of all, the anguish of those fixed eyes made all that crowd terrible and pathetic. Philip loathed them, and yet his heart ached with the infinite pity which filled him. He took his coat from the cloak-room and went out into the bitter coldness of the night.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Marco Polo tells the tale of The Old Man in the Mountains and how he recruits new members to his Band of Assassins by means of drugs, beautiful women, lush gardens, and religious promises. The unfortunate thing about this world is that the good habits are much easier to give up than the bad ones.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

It is well known that Beauty does not look with a good grace on the timid advances of Humour.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Imagination grows by exercise, and contrary to common belief, is more powerful in the mature than in the young.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

If you want to eat well in England, eat three breakfasts.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Our wise old church...has discovered that if you will act as if you believed belief will be given to you; if you pray with doubt, but pray with sincerity, your doubt will be dispelled; if you will surrender yourself to the beauty of that liturgy the power of which over the human spirit has been proved by the experience of the ages, peace will descend upon you.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Excess on occasion is exhilarating. It prevents moderation from acquiring the deadening effect of a habit.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I am sick of this way of life. The weariness and sadness of old age make it intolerable. I have walked with death in hand, and death's own hand is warmer than my own. I don't wish to live any longer.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

In Hollywood, the women are all peaches. It makes one long for an apple occasionally.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I don't think that women ought to sit down at table with men. It ruins conversation and I'm sure it's very bad for them. It puts ideas in their heads, and women are never at ease with themselves when they have ideas.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Success. I don't believe it has any effect on me. For one thing I always expected it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

It might be that to surrender to happiness was to accept defeat, but it was a defeat better than many victories.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Life wouldn’t be worth living if I worried over the future as well as the present. When things are at their worst I find something always happens.

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

You are not angry with people when you laugh at them. Humor teaches tolerance.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

I've always been interested in people, but I've never liked them.

By Anonym 18 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

People wonder at the romantic lives of poets and artists, but they should rather wonder at their gift of expression. The occurrences which pass unnoticed in the life of the average man in the existence of a writer of talent are profoundly interesting. It is the man they happen to that makes their significance.

By Anonym 13 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

A man filled with meat turns his back on the dry bones of political doctrine. Fanatical devotion to the ruling party comes more readily from the materially deprived At a dinner party one should eat wisely but not too well, and talk well but not too wisely.

By Anonym 14 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

Thank God, I can look at a sunset now without having to think how to describe it

By Anonym 15 Sep

W. Somerset Maugham

What does democracy come down to? The persuasive power of slogans invented by wily self-seeking politicians.