Best 359 of James Joyce quotes - MyQuotes

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James Joyce
By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

I have the words already. What I am seeking is the perfect order of words in the sentence. You can see for yourself how many different ways they might be arranged.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Mistakes are the portals of discovery.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

People could put up with being bitten by a wolf but what properly riled them was a bite from a sheep.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

I am quite content to go down to posterity as a scissors and paste man for that seems to me a harsh but not unjust description

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Shaw's works make me admire the magnificent tolerance and broadmindedness of the english.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

British Beatitudes! ... Beer, beef, business, bibles, bulldogs, battleships, buggery and bishops.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Poetry, even when apparently most fantastic, is always a revolt against artifice, a revolt, in a sense, against actuality. It speaks of what seems fantastic and unreal to those who have lost the simple intuitions which are the test of reality; and, as it is often found at war with its age, so it makes no account of history, which is fabled by the daughters of memory.

By Anonym 19 Sep

James Joyce

To speak of these things and to try to understand their nature and, having understood it, to try slowly and humbly and constantly to express, to press out again, from the gross earth or what it brings forth, from sound and shape and colour which are the prison gates of our soul, an image of the beauty we have come to understand—that is art.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

[Robinson Crusoe] is the true prototype of the British colonist. The whole Anglo-Saxon spirit is in Crusoe: the manly independence, the unconscious cruelty, the persistence, the slow yet efficient intelligence, the sexual apathy, the calculating taciturnity.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Joyce

He watched their flight; bird after bird: a dark flash, a swerve, a flutter of wings. He tried to count them before all their darting quivering bodies passed: six, ten, eleven: and wondered were they odd or even in number. Twelve, thirteen: for two came wheeling down from the upper sky. They were flying high and low but ever round and round in straight and curving lines and ever flying from left to right, circling about a temple of air.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

A few light taps upon the pane made him turn to the window. It had begun to snow again. He watched sleepily the flakes, silver and dark, falling obliquely against the lamplight. The time had come for him to set out on his journey westward. Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland. It was falling on every part of the dark central plain, on the treeless hills, falling softly upon the Bog of Allen and, farther westward, softly falling into the dark mutinous Shannon waves. It was falling, too, upon every part of the lonely churchyard on the hill where Michael Furey lay buried. It lay thickly drifted on the crooked crosses and headstones, on the spears of the little gate, on the barren thorns. His soul swooned slowly as he heard the snow falling faintly through the universe and faintly falling, like the descent of their last end, upon all the living and the dead.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

All things are inconstant except the faith in the soul, which changes all things and fills their inconstancy with light.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Joyce

Early morning: set off at dawn. Travel round in front of the sun, steal a day's march on him. Keep it up for ever never grow a day older technically.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

I see the regions of snow and ice, I see the sharp-eyed Samoiede and the Finn, I see the seal-seeker in his boat poising his lance, I see the Siberian on his slight-built sledge drawn by dogs, I see the porpoise-hunters, I see the whale-crews of the south Pacific and the north Atlantic, I see the cliffs, glaciers, torrents, valleys of Switzerland - I mark the long winters and the isolation.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

No pen, no ink, no table, no room, no time, no quiet, no inclination.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

They lived and laughed and loved and left.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

First, in the history of words there is much that indicates the history of men, and in comparing the speech of to-day with that ofyears ago, we have a useful illustration of the effect of external influences on the very words of a race.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Joyce

Here's lumbos. Where misties swaddlum, where misches lodge none, where mystries pour kind on, O sleepy! So be yet!

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

Her name sprang to my lips at moments in strange prayers and praises which I myself did not understand. My eyes were often full of tears (I could not tell why) and at times a flood from my heart seemed to pour itself out into my bosom. I thought little of the future. I did not know whether I would ever speak to her or not or, if I spoke to her, how I could tell her of my confused adoration.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

The artist who could disentangle the subtle soul of the image from its mesh of defining circumstances most exactly and 're-embody' it in artistic circumstances chosen as the most exact for it in its new office, he was the supreme artist.

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Joyce

- Se på havet. Hva bryr vel det seg om krenkelser? Buck Mulligan

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

A way a lone a last a loved a long the—

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Joyce

—Pascal, if I remember rightly, would not suffer his mother to kiss him as he feared the contact of her sex.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

Very gratefully, with grateful appreciation, with sincere appreciative gratitude, in appreciatively grateful sincerity of regret, he declined.

By Anonym 16 Sep

James Joyce

... I've a thirst on me I wouldn't sell for half a crown. - Give it a name, citizen, says Joe. - Wine of the country, says he. - What's yours? says Joe. - Ditto MacAnaspey, says I. - Three pints, Terry, says Joe. And how's the old heart, citizen? says he.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

There is an atmosphere of spiritual effort here. No other city is quite like it. I wake early, often at 5 o'clock, and start writing at once.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Lily, the caretaker's daughter, was literally run off her feet. Hardly had she brought one gentleman into the little pantry behind the office on the ground floor and helped him off with his overcoat, than the wheezy hall-door bell clanged again and she had to scamper along the bare hallway to let in another guest. It was well for her she had not to attend to the ladies also.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

I could call my wandering thoughts together. I had hardly any patience with the serious work of life which, now that it stood between me and my desire, seemed to me child's play, ugly monotonous child's play.

By Anonym 19 Sep

James Joyce

The peace of the gardens and the kindly lights in the windows poured a tender influence into his restless heart.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

The State is concentric, but the individual is eccentric.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

White pudding and eggs and sausages and cups of tea! How simple and beautiful was life after all!

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

A dim antagonism gathered force within him and darkened his mind as a cloud against her disloyalty: and when it passed, cloudlike, leaving his mind serene and dutiful towards her again, he was made aware dimly and without regret of a first noiseless sundering of their lives.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

The apprehensive faculty must be scrutinised in action.

By Anonym 20 Sep

James Joyce

Why was the host (victim predestined) sad? He wished that a tale of a deed should be told of a deed not by him should by him not be told.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

He asked himself what is a woman standing on the stairs in the shadow, listening to distant music, a symbol of. If he were a painter he would paint her in that attitude. Her blue felt hat would show off the bronze of her hair against the darkness and the dark panels of her skirt would show off the light ones. Distant Music he would call the picture if he were a painter.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

What? Corpus. Body. Corpse. Good idea the Latin. Stupifies them first. Hospice for the dying. They don't seem to chew it; only swallow it down.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

The mouth can be better engaged than with a cylinder of rank weed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Save the trees of Ireland for the future men of Ireland on the fair hills of Eire, O.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Never let us do wrong, because our opponents did so. Let us, rather, by doing right, show them what they ought to have done, and establish a rule the dictates of reason and conscience, rather than of the angry passions.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

He comes into the world God knows how, walks on the water, gets out of his grave and goes up off the Hill of Howth. What drivel is this?

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Oh Ireland my first and only love Where Christ and Caesar are hand in glove!

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

Her image had passed into his soul for ever and no word had broken the holy silence of his ecstasy. Her eyes had called him and his soul had leaped at the call. To live, to err, to fall, to triumph, to recreate life out of life! A wild angel had appeared to him, the angel of mortal youth and beauty, an envoy from the fair courts of life, to throw open before him in an instant of ecstasy the gates of all the ways of error and glory. On and on and on and on!

By Anonym 18 Sep

James Joyce

The language in which we are speaking is his before it is mine. How different are the words HOME, CHRIST, ALE, MASTER, on his lips and on mine! I cannot speak or write these words without unrest of spirit. His language, so familiar and so foreign, will always be for me an acquired speech. I have not made or accepted its words. My voice holds them at bay. My soul frets in the shadow of his language.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

You ask me why I don’t love you, but surely you must believe I am very fond of you and if to desire to possess a person wholly, to admire and honour that person deeply, and to seek to secure that person’s happiness in every way is to “love” then perhaps my affection for you is a kind of love. I will tell you this that your soul seems to me to be the most beautiful and simple soul in the world and it may be because I am so conscious of this when I look at you that my love or affection for you loses much of its violence.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

My words in her mind: cold polished stones sinking through a quagmire.

By Anonym 14 Sep

James Joyce

Some people believe that we go on living in another body after death, that we lived before. They call it reincarnation. That we all lived before on the earth thousands of years ago or on some other planet. They say we have forgotten it. Some say they remember their past lives.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to myself the word paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in the Catechism. But now it sounded to me like the name of some maleficent and sinful being. It filled me with fear, and yet I longed to be nearer to it and to look upon its deadly work.

By Anonym 20 Sep

James Joyce

You don't know yet what money is. Money is power, when you have lived as long as I have. I know, I know. If youth but knew. But what does Shakespeare say? Put money in thy purse.

By Anonym 15 Sep

James Joyce

White wine is like electricity. Red wine looks and tastes like a liquified beefsteak.

By Anonym 13 Sep

James Joyce

Desire's wind blasts the thorntree but after it becomes from a bramblebush to be a rose upon the rood of time.