Best 115 of Inclusion quotes - MyQuotes

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

As a result, the success of the ministry volunteers is often every bit as important as the success of the participating kids. And the skills of the ministry leaders do impact the accommodation plans that are developed for participants with special needs.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Showing participants in a positive light may be the first time some parents have had their child celebrated at all, let alone publicly. The church cannot underestimate the meaningful way this affects a family of a child with special needs. Using the public venue of a worship service will shape the entire church's view of disability, reminding them of God's value for everyone.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Karen Armstrong

We can either emphasize those aspects of our traditions, religious or secular, that speak of hatred, exclusion, and suspicion or work with those that stress the interdependence and equality of all human beings. The choice is yours. (22)

By Anonym 18 Sep

Daryl Gregory

Perhaps that's a smile on Delia's face-but Delia's half skull turns every expression into a leer. She says, "Your uncle had a talent, kid. He made families wherever he went.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

It's the church's responsibility to thoughtfully, intentionally, and respectfully engage everyone - because God loves them all. That's the gospel being lived out for all to see and experience.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Geoffrey Miller

Imagine a young Isaac Newton time-travelling from 1670s England to teach Harvard undergrads in 2017. After the time-jump, Newton still has an obsessive, paranoid personality, with Asperger’s syndrome, a bad stutter, unstable moods, and episodes of psychotic mania and depression. But now he’s subject to Harvard’s speech codes that prohibit any “disrespect for the dignity of others”; any violations will get him in trouble with Harvard’s Inquisition (the ‘Office for Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion’). Newton also wants to publish Philosophiæ Naturalis Principia Mathematica, to explain the laws of motion governing the universe. But his literary agent explains that he can’t get a decent book deal until Newton builds his ‘author platform’ to include at least 20k Twitter followers – without provoking any backlash for airing his eccentric views on ancient Greek alchemy, Biblical cryptography, fiat currency, Jewish mysticism, or how to predict the exact date of the Apocalypse. Newton wouldn’t last long as a ‘public intellectual’ in modern American culture. Sooner or later, he would say ‘offensive’ things that get reported to Harvard and that get picked up by mainstream media as moral-outrage clickbait. His eccentric, ornery awkwardness would lead to swift expulsion from academia, social media, and publishing. Result? On the upside, he’d drive some traffic through Huffpost, Buzzfeed, and Jezebel, and people would have a fresh controversy to virtue-signal about on Facebook. On the downside, we wouldn’t have Newton’s Laws of Motion.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jamie Arpin-ricci

The weaponization of belonging is one of the most "anti-christ" dynamics I have ever encountered.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Paul Isaacs

It's funny that being human means so many things, man made divisions counter our judgements towards being wary of the "other", this is worrying because the thing that unites us is being human that is what we all are and without lament but with joy we should embrace everybody we would then live in utopia of diversity.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Parents have a moral obligation to share knowledge about their child when that information could significantly benefit or protect the actual child, caregivers, other students, and the church staff.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Janna Cachola

Those who dont matter, dont matter. Those who matter respects you and those who respect you are all that matters.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dainin Katagiri

If you don’t understand, please keep your mouth shut and just live with all sentient beings in peace and harmony beyond your intellectual speculation. It’s not necessary to think how much that helps people or how many people it helps. All you have to do is be peaceful with people right now, right here, day by day.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Of all the goals and outcomes for a special needs ministry, there is one that is most important: To enable parents of kids with special needs to attend their own worship and Bible study. After all, any child (with or without special needs) has the greatest opportunity to experience the love of Christ when they are raised by parents with a mature faith of their own.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Jean Vanier

Those who are weak have great difficulty finding their place in our society. The image of the ideal human as powerful and capable disenfranchises the old, the sick, the less-abled. For me, society must, by definition, be inclusive of the needs and gifts of all its members. How can we lay claim to making an open and friendly society where human rights are respected and fostered when, by the values we teach and foster, we systematically exclude segments of our population? I believe that those we most often exclude from the normal life of society, people with disabilities, have profound lessons to teach us. When we do include them, they add richly to our lives and add immensely to our world.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Everyone wins when the "burden" mind-set is abandoned and where the special needs ministry sees itself as a blessing to those who choose to be part of their community.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Kristin Schell

We live in a world where people profile and label each other, size each other up. What if we shifted our focus to our similarities? To welcoming one another, listening to stories, learning from one another? It's time to change the conversation. I believe most social ills can be healed or prevented by the simple act of talking to one another, face-to-face, at a common table.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Sara Bareilles

... collectively they all taught us generosity, kindness, and inclusion, and that you always share what you have, even when it's not much. My parents managed to construct a little safe haven for my sisters and me to build ourselves within, which seems almost impossible to me when I think about how quickly childhood seems to disappear these days. They have taught me about the truest kind of love: the kind that is steadfast and strong, even when it changes shape.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

While full inclusion inside our churches is ideal, that goal is secondary to making the gospel fully accessible. When considering the proper placement of any student of any ability, the first concern should always be positioning that individual in the setting with the culture and the teaching methods that est facilitate meaningful spiritual growth for them.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

In my view, the ultimate goal for a special needs ministry is to being families into a growing relationship with Jesus Christ. And in order for that to happen, a church has to be prepared to successfully accommodate the child with special needs during regular church programming.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Neil Gaiman

I think that is something that I always like in my work - the sense of inclusion rather than the sense of otherness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

The churches with the strongest special needs ministries seem to know the secret: a ministry leader who values their relationship with their volunteers almost as much as they value their relationship with the families they serve.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

The big-picture goal of a church's special needs ministry is to facilitate a sense of belonging inside the bigger body of Christ. Our best indicator of success is when we see a student with special needs feeling accepted, comfortable and open to the church's influence in their life. - Katie Garvert

By Anonym 18 Sep

Melinda Gates

Saving lives starts with bringing everyone in. Our societies will be healthiest when they have no outsiders. We should strive for that. We have to keep working to reduce poverty and disease. We have to help outsiders resist the power of people who want to keep them out. But we have to do our inner work as well: We have to wake up to the ways we exclude. We have to open our arms and our hearts to the people we’ve pushed to the margins. It’s not enough to help outsiders fight their way in—the real triumph will come when we no longer push anyone out.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

By and large, the special needs ministry leader is a translator of sorts, responsible for understanding and bridging the gap between two very unique cultures: the church and the special needs community.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

On their own, the leader of a church's special needs ministry can't meet every need of every volunteer or participating family. But that leader can model service in a way that caring becomes contagious.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Abhijit Naskar

I am no thinker - what I really am is, a brother to every girl and boy, a son to every woman and man, a grandson to every elderly person - I belong to every single person on earth, for you all are my own family - your tradition is my tradition, your culture is my culture, your religion is my religion, your language is my language - science means nothing to me, scriptures mean nothing to me, God means nothing to me, for I see my God in you - you are my home, you are my temple, you are my God, you are my gospel - and nothing gives me greater bliss than being annihilated in your service.

By Anonym 17 Sep

David Steindl-rast

Meaning springs from belonging.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

We as the church do not want to lag behind society today, in terms of welcoming people of different cultures, races, and abilities.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

As a church, we need to be very careful about developing and expressing opinions on these topics.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

In churches that care about special needs inclusion I have found that the single biggest determinant for a child's success is the strength of the relationship between the church and the child's parents. When church leaders and parents are in general agreement regarding a child's abilities and needs, problems tend to get solved with greater speed and ingenuity. But when parents view their child's special needs as nonexistent or insignificant, it creates extra work (and stress!) for everyone serving that child. This is the reason that it is sometimes easier for churches to successfully include children with complex needs that are obvious than it is for churches to successfully include high-functioning children whose disabilities are less obvious. When parents dismiss a child's legitimate need for even occasional assistance it makes it really hard for the child and the volunteers serving them to experience success.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

The self-contained special needs environment may be the one and only venue that facilitates the spiritual growth for some students because it's the only place that Jesus is shared in that individual's native language.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Sam Killermann

The world is getting too small for both an Us and a Them. Us and Them have become codependent, intertwined, fixed to one another. We have no separate fates, but are bound together in one. And our fear of one another is the only thing capable of our undoing.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Melinda Gates

I hope the exposure to other people and places shapes what the kids do, but even more I want it to shape who they are. I want them to see that in the universal human desire to be happy, to develop our gifts, to contribute to others, to love and be loved—we’re all the same. Nobody is any better than anybody else, and no one’s happiness or human dignity matters more than anyone else’s.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Marty Rubin

If a circle shuts you out, draw a circle around it.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

It is important that the church think outside the box, actively pursuing a relationship with the family, just as Jesus Christ pursues a relationship with each of us.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Ajaypal Singh Banga

We have the Internet of Everything but not the inclusion of everyone.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

The best way to connect with such a family is to recognize what's unique about their life story. Your support is felt when they see your desire to join them in bearing their burdens.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

When a diagnosis is still fresh, do not pressure parents to focus on the positive about the situation. Doing so suggests that the parents aren't allowed to grieve.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Laurie Buchanan

INCLUSION—It's amazing what happens when we allow the flower that is us, the flower that is them, to become part of the bouquet.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Melinda Gates

Anyone can be made to feel like an outsider. It’s up to the people who have the power to exclude. Often it’s on the basis of race. Depending on a culture’s fears and biases, Jews can be treated as outsiders. Muslims can be treated as outsiders. Christians can be treated as outsiders. The poor are always outsiders. The sick are often outsiders. People with disabilities can be treated as outsiders. Members of the LGBTQ community can be treated as outsiders. Immigrants are almost always outsiders. And in most every society, women can be made to feel like outsiders—even in their own homes. Overcoming the need to create outsiders is our greatest challenge as human beings. It is the key to ending deep inequality. We stigmatize and send to the margins people who trigger in us the feelings we want to avoid. This is why there are so many old and weak and sick and poor people on the margins of society. We tend to push out the people who have qualities we’re most afraid we will find in ourselves—and sometimes we falsely ascribe qualities we disown to certain groups, then push those groups out as a way of denying those traits in ourselves. This is what drives dominant groups to push different racial and religious groups to the margins. And we’re often not honest about what’s happening. If we’re on the inside and see someone on the outside, we often say to ourselves, “I’m not in that situation because I’m different. But that’s just pride talking. We could easily be that person. We have all things inside us. We just don’t like to confess what we have in common with outsiders because it’s too humbling. It suggests that maybe success and failure aren’t entirely fair. And if you know you got the better deal, then you have to be humble, and it hurts to give up your sense of superiority and say, “I’m no better than others.” So instead we invent excuses for our need to exclude. We say it’s about merit or tradition when it’s really just protecting our privilege and our pride.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Kathryn Finney

Tech is not looking for inclusion per se, but they're looking for assimilation. They're looking for Blacks and Latinos and women, but they are looking for these groups as versions of themselves.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

While we all need to be nudged outside our comfort zone occasionally, it is important for church leaders (and parents!) to recognize that a nudge can quickly turn into an anxiety-inducing "push" for many kids with special needs.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Kamand Kojouri

Our homes travel with us. They are wherever we feel loved and accepted.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

As church leaders, our opinions on these topics aren't necessary to effectively love and support families who have children with disabilities. Encourage ministry team members and volunteers to remember the calling of the church: to enable families to develop a growing relationship with Jesus Christ.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Alejandro Grimson

Mito: Masividad y calidad son dos términos irreconciliables El mayor acceso a la educación genera fuertes tensiones y desafíos en todos los países. Si un número relevante de niños y jóvenes que estaban fuera del sistema ingresan en él, como sucedió en años recientes en la Argentina, sobre todo a partir de la obligatoriedad del secundario, la composición social y cultural de las aulas se transforma. Para los docentes, crece el desafío de dar respuesta a una situación que no admite recetas simples. En las instituciones donde este cambio ha sido más significativo muchos docentes se sienten desbordados por la complejidad del escenario. [...] Pero una cosa es que no existan recetas y otra muy diferente es que las dificultades lleven a situaciones de frustración que terminen por consagrar un mito: no se pueden llevar adelante buenos procesos de enseñanza con alumnos que “no quieren aprender”. Este mito busca atacar las políticas de inclusión que “meten” en la escuela, y en el aula, a los “alumnos problema”. [...] Es habitual que la elite sienta nostalgia de la homogeneidad social y cultural, de los buenos tiempos en que a “toda” la sociedad le gustaba la música clásica y todo marchaba mejor que ahora, una época en la que dominan el rock y la cumbia. En realidad, esa “sociedad” de antes estaba integrada exclusivamente por quienes tenían cierta extracción de clase y gustos culturales afines. El resto de los ciudadanos estaban completamente excluidos. Añorar aquello es como sentir nostalgia por la época del primer Centenario: en 1910 no había voto universal y el analfabetismo era alto. En ese sentido, los sectores de la elite se quejan y padecen los procesos de inclusión que tienden a universalizar derechos, tendencia a la que prefieren denominar “masificación”. Y si bien la exclusión jurídica ha desaparecido, la discriminación social se advierte aún en sectores medios y altos que procuran evitar el contacto con la “masificación” o con la heterogeneidad social. Como son motivos no siempre fáciles de enunciar en voz alta, suelen mencionar otras mitomanías para justificar sus gestos y decisiones. En algunos casos, para conjurar los temores pueden permitirse asistir a colegios o universidades más exigentes (pero ¿cuántos llegan a Harvard?). Otras veces, concurren a instituciones de enseñanza privada que están muy por debajo de la educación pública. Quizás allí se ofrezca un servicio de calidad y una atención personalizada, pero esto no siempre se corresponde con la calidad académica. [...] Detrás del mito asoma una concepción elitista de la vida y de la calidad en términos de excelencia (que, por definición, no podría ser generalizada). Incluso, a veces se constata un gesto aristocrático extemporáneo, cuando esa visión elitista es enunciada por alguien que se imagina a sí mismo, en el pasado, como parte de los estratos más altos del sistema, cuando en realidad habría estado entre los excluidos. Hay que distinguir la forma de enunciar el mito de su significado. Por ejemplo, se dice que “hay que elegir entre masividad y calidad porque son incompatibles”, cuando en realidad se quiere (y no se puede) decir que debería haber “escuelas de calidad para los buenos alumnos” y “escuelas de cuarta para los alumnos de cuarta”.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

When you nurture and prioritize relationship for the volunteers, the volunteers become the ministry's greatest recruiting tools, because they tell others.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Teresa R. Funke

If you build a wall to separate people, there will be those who find a way around the wall, or over it, or under it, or through it. We humans are not meant to be contained, and neither are our thoughts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Patti Digh

Create inclusion - with simple mindfulness that others might have a different reality from your own.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Few things feel as threatening to a mother as does something that jeopardizes others' love for and acceptance of her child.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Ellen Notbohm

If we can't start by seeing an autistic child as inherently capable, interesting, and valuable, no amount of education or therapy we layer on top is going to matter.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Amy Fenton Lee

Accessibility means more than adding a ramp between the sidewalk and the front door of a building. It includes the ease in which a product, service, or environment can be utilized across "diverse human populations, their abilities and their needs".