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Charles Dickens
By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

A man would die tonight of lying out on the marshes, I thought. And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pitty in all the glittering multitude.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Charles Dickens

[S]ome score of members of the High Court of Chancery bar ought to be --- as here they are --- mistily engaged in one of the ten thousand stages of an endless cause, tripping one another up on slippery precedents, groping knee-deep in technicalities, running their goat-hair and horse-hair warded heads against walls of words, and making a pretence of equity with serious faces ....

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

Never sign a valentine with your own name.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

There is no substitute for thoroughgoing, ardent, and sincere earnestness.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

I am a neat hand at cookery, and I'll tell you what I knocked up for my Christmas-eve dinner in the Library Cart. I knocked up a beefsteak-pudding for one, with two kidneys, a dozen oysters, and a couple of mushrooms thrown in. It's a pudding to put a man in good humour with everything, except the two bottom buttons of his waistcoat.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

"I go so far as to say, miss, morehover," proceeded Mr. Cruncher, with a most alarming tendency to hold forth as from a pulpit-"and let my words be took down and took to Mrs. Cruncher through yourself-that wot my opinions respectin' flopping has undergone a change, and that wot I only hope with all my heart as Mrs. Cruncher may be a flopping at the present time.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

Home is a word stronger than a magician ever spoke.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles Dickens

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were going directly to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way- in short, the period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being, received, for good or for evil, in superlative degree of comparison only.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

The New Testament is the very best book that ever was or ever will be known in the world.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Charles Dickens

Looking down these dreary passages, the dull repose and quiet that prevails, is awful. Occasionally, there is a drowsy sound from some lone weaver’s shuttle, or shoemaker’s last, but it is stifled by the thick walls and heavy dungeon-door, and only serves to make the general stillness more profound. Over the head and face of every prisoner who comes into this melancholy house, a black hood is drawn; and in this dark shroud, an emblem of the curtain dropped between him and the living world, he is led to the cell from which he never again comes forth, until his whole term of imprisonment has expired….He is a man buried alive; to be dug out in the slow round of years…. And though he lives to be in the same cell ten weary years, he has no means of knowing, down to the very last hour, in what part of the building it is situated; what kind of men there are about him; whether in the long winter night there are living people near, or he is in some lonely corner of the great jail, with walls, and passages, and iron doors between him and the nearest sharer in its solitary horrors.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

I have always thought of Christmas time... as a good time; a kind, forgiving, charitable, pleasant time.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

He did each single thing as if he did nothing else.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

The evening wind made such a disturbance just now, among some tall old elm-trees at the bottom of the garden, that neither my mother nor Miss Betsey could forbear glancing that way. As the elms bent to one another, like giants who were whispering secrets, and after a few seconds of such repose, fell into a violent flurry, tossing their wild arms about, as if their late confidences were really too wicked for their peace of mind.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings. Viewed by this light it becomes a coherent scheme, and not the monstrous maze the laity are apt to think it. Let them but once clearly perceive that its grand principle is to make business for itself at their expense, and surely they will cease to grumble.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

The cold hoarfrost glistened on the tombstones, and sparkled like rows of gems, among the stone carvings of the old church. The snow lay hard and crisp upon the ground; and spread over the thickly-strewn mounds of earth, so white and smooth a cover, that it seemed as if corpses lay there, hidden only by their winding sheets.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles Dickens

Era daqueles dias de março em que o sol brilha quente e o vento sopra frio, de modo que se tem verão ao sol, e inverno à sombra.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

From the days when it was always summer in Eden, to these days when it is mostly winter in fallen latitudes, the world of a man has invariably gone one way Charles Darnay's way the way of the love of a woman

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

Mr. Pickwick took a seat and the paper, but instead of reading the latter, peeped over the top of it, and took a survey of the man of business, who was an elderly, pimply-faced, vegetable-diet sort of man, in a black coat, dark mixture trousers, and small black gaiters; a kind of being who seemed to be an essential part of the desk at which he was writing, and to have as much thought or sentiment.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

"We thought that, perhaps," said I, hesitating, "it is right to begin with the obligations of home, sir; and that, perhaps, while those are overlooked and neglected, no other duties can possibly be substituted for them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

You should know," said Estella. "I am what you have made me. Take all the praise, take all the blame; take all the success, take all the failure; in short, take me.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

In particular, there was a butler in a blue coat and bright buttons, who gave quite a winey flavour to the table beer; he poured it out so superbly.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

There have been occasions in my later life (I suppose as in most lives) when I have felt for a time as if a thick curtain had fallen on all its interest and romance, to shut me out from anything save dull endurance any more. Never has that curtain dropped so heavy and blank, as when my way in life lay stretched out straight before me through the newly-entered road of apprenticeship to Joe.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

He lowered the window, and looked out at the rising sun. There was a ridge of ploughed land, with a plough upon it where it had been left last night when the horses were unyoked; beyond, a quiet coppice-wood, in which many leaves of burning red and golden yellow still remained upon the trees. Though the earth was cold and wet, the sky was clear, and the sun rose bright, placid, and beautiful.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

Yet, I had nothing else to tell; unless, indeed, I were to confess (which might be of less moment still), that no one can ever believe this Narrative, in the reading, more than I believed it in the writing.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles Dickens

It was not because I had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, but because Joe had a strong sense of the virtue of industry, that I worked with tolerable zeal against the grain.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

... when the locked door opens, and there comes in a young woman, deadly pale, and with long fair hair, who glides to the fire, and sits down in the chair we have left there, wringing her hands.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

This was my only and my constant comfort. When I think of it, the picture always rises in my mind, of a summer evening, the boys at play in the churchyard, and I sitting on my bed, reading as if for life.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

Never imitate the eccentricities of genius, but toil after it in its truer flights. They are not so easy to follow, but they lead to higher regions.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

[I]t seemed as if the streets were absorbed by the sky, and the night were all in the air.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

You hear, Eugene?' said Lightwood over his shoulder. 'You are deeply interested in lime.' 'Without lime,' returned that unmoved barrister at law, 'my existence would be unilluminated by a ray of hope.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

I went away, dear Agnes, loving you. I stayed away, loving you. I returned home, loving you!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

A faithful dependent, I overlook his folly.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

It is a pleasant thing to reflect upon, and furnishes a complete answer to those who contend for the gradual degeneration of the human species, that every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

... Any Christian spirit working kindly in its little sphere, whatever it may be, will find its mortal life too short for its vast means of usefulness!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

What are the odds so long as the fire of the soul is kindled at the taper of conviviality, and the wing of friendship never molts a feather?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

She was more than human to me. She was a Fairy, a Sylph. I don't know what she was, anything that no one ever saw, and everything that everybody ever wanted. I was swallowed up in an abyss of love in an instant. There was no pausing on the brink, no looking down, or looking back. I was gone, headlong, before I had sense to say a word to her.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Charles Dickens

Woodcourt: “Miss Summerson,” said Mr. Woodcourt, “if without obtruding myself on your confidence I may remain near you, pray let me do so.” Esther: “You are truly kind,” I answered. “I need wish to keep no secret of my own from you; if I keep any, it is another’s.” Woodcourt: “I quite understand. Trust me, I will remain near you only so long as I can fully respect it.” Esther: “I trust implicitly to you,” I said, “I know and deeply feel how sacredly you keep your promise.” - pg.807

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

When the moon shines very brilliantly, a solitude and stillness seem to proceed from her that influence even crowded places full of life.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

Don't you think that any secret course is an unworthy one?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

Accidentally consumed five biscuits when I wasn't paying attention. Those biscuits are wily fellows - they leap in like sugary ninjas

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

"The twins no longer derive their sustenance from Nature's founts - in short," said Mr. Micawber, in one of his bursts of confidence, "they are weaned...

By Anonym 13 Sep

Charles Dickens

As I never saw my father or my mother, and never saw any likeness of either of them (for their days were long before the days of photographs), my first fancies regarding what they were like, were unreasonably derived from their tombstones. The shape of the letters on my father's, gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout, dark man, with curly black hair. From the character and turn of the inscription, "Also Georgiana Wife of the Above", I drew a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

It is not possible to know how far the influence of any amiable, honest-hearted duty-doing man flies out into the world, but it is very possible to know how it has touched one's self in going by.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles Dickens

...his philanthropy was of that gunpowderous sort that the difference between it & animosity was hard to determine

By Anonym 15 Sep

Charles Dickens

There is nothing truer than physiognomy, taken in connection with manner.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Charles Dickens

The coffee was boiling over a charcoal fire, and large slices of bread and butter were piled one upon the other like deals in a lumber yard.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Charles Dickens

his face, though lined, bore few traces of anxiety. But, perhaps the confidential bachelor clerks in Tellson's Bank were principally occupied with the cares of other people; and perhaps second-hand cares, like second-hand clothes, come easily off and on.