Best 219 of Anne Morrow Lindbergh quotes - MyQuotes

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Anne Morrow Lindbergh
By Anonym 19 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

There is, of course, always the personal satisfaction of writing down one's own experiences so they may be saved, caught and pinned under glass, hoarded against the winter of forgetfulness. Time has been cheated a little, at least, in one's own life, and a personal, trivial immortality of an old self assured.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

For in our family an experience was not finished, not truly experienced, unless written down or shared with another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

When one is a stranger to oneself, then one is estranged from others, too. If one is out of touch with oneself, then one cannot touch others. Only when one is connected to one's own core, is one connected to others. And for me, the core, the inner spring, can best be re-found through silence.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Forsythia is pure joy. There is not an ounce, not a glimmer of sadness or even knowledge in forsythia. Pure, undiluted, untouched joy.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I am most anxious to give my own children enough love and understanding so that they won't grow up with an aching void in them--like you and I and Harold and Martha. That can never be filled, and one goes around all one's life trying, trying to make up for what one didn't get that was one's birthright, asking the wrong people for it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Women need solitude in order to find again the true essence of themselves.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

People talk about love as though it were something you could give, like an armful of flowers. And a lot of people give love like that -- just dump it down on top of you, a useless strong-scented burden.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Perhaps middle-age is, or should be, a period of shedding shells; the shell of ambition, the shell of material accumulations and possessions, the shell of the ego.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Flowers always have it - poise, completion, fulfillment, perfection . . .

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

But I want first of all- in fact, as an end to these other desires- to be at peace with myself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

...the only continuity possible in life, as in love, is in growth, in fluidity - in freedom. The only real security is... living in the present and accepting it as it is now.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I am very fond of the oyster shell. It is humble and awkward and ugly. It is slate-colored and unsymmetrical. Its form is not primarily beautiful but functional. I make fun of its knobbiness. Sometimes I resent its burdens and excrescences. But its tireless adaptability and tenacity draw my astonished admiration and sometimes even my tears. And it is comfortable in its familiarity, its homeliness, like old garden gloves when have molded themselves perfectly to the shape of the hand. I do not like to put it down. I will not want to leave it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I think best with a pencil in my hand.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

This is what one thirsts for, I realize, after the smallness of the day, of work, of details, of intimacy - even of communication, one thirsts for the magnitude and universality of a night full of stars, pouring into one like a fresh tide.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

For sleep, one needs endless depths of blackness to sink into; daylight is too shallow, it will not cover one.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

the issue of war or peace is an issue that concerns not only experts on Foreign Affairs but every citizen of the United States.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Nothing feeds the center of being so much as creative work. The curtain of mechanization has come down between the mind and the hand.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

We are always bargaining with our feelings so that we can live from day to day.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

For Sayonara, literally translated, 'Since it must be so,' of all the good-bys I have heard is the most beautiful. Unlike the Auf Wiedershens and Au revoirs, it does not try to cheat itself by any bravado 'Till we meet again,' any sedative to postpone the pain of separation. It does not evade the issue like the sturdy blinking Farewell. Farewell is a father's good-by. It is - 'Go out in the world and do well, my son.' It is encouragement and admonition. It is hope and faith. But it passes over the significance of the moment; of parting it says nothing. It hides its emotion. It says too little. While Good-by ('God be with you') and Adios say too much. They try to bridge the distance, almost to deny it. Good-by is a prayer, a ringing cry. 'You must not go - I cannot bear to have you go! But you shall not go alone, unwatched. God will be with you. God's hand will over you' and even - underneath, hidden, but it is there, incorrigible - 'I will be with you; I will watch you - always.' It is a mother's good-by. But Sayonara says neither too much nor too little. It is a simple acceptance of fact. All understanding of life lies in its limits. All emotion, smoldering, is banked up behind it. But it says nothing. It is really the unspoken good-by, the pressure of a hand, 'Sayonara.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

My diaries were written primarily, I think, not to preserve the experience but to savor it, to make it even more real, more visible and palpable, than in actual life. For in our family an experience was not finished, not truly experienced, unless written down or shared with another.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Everything today has been heavy and brown. Bring me a Unicorn to ride about the town.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

What a crippling art writing is, no body to it, no craft, really. It's all in the mind and you never see it or feel it -- only sometimes hear it. It uses only such a small part of man. I wish I were a sculptor.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

The punctuation of anniversaries is terrible, like the closing of doors, one after another between you and what you want to hold on to.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

If one talks to more than four people, it is an audience; and one cannot really think or exchange thoughts with an audience.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

The fundamental magic of flying, a miracle that has nothing to do with any of its practical purposes - purposes of speed, accessibility, and convenience - and will not change as they change.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

The here, the now and the individual have always been the special concern of the saint, the artist, the poet and -- from time immemorial--the woman.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I should like to be a full-time Mother and a full-time Artist and a full-time Wife-Companion and also a 'Charming Woman' on the side! And to be aware and record it all. I cannot do it all. Something must go - several things probably. The 'charming woman' first!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

When you love someone you do not love them, all the time, in the exact same way, from moment to moment. It is an impossibility. It is a lie to pretend to. And yet this is exactly what most of us demand. We have so little faith in the ebb and flow of life, of love, of relationships.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

It is the striving after perfection that makes one an artist. It is the sense that one is imperfect, unfulfilled, unfinished. One attempts by a superhuman effort to fill the gap, to leap over it, to finish it in another medium. And one creates a third and separate thing: 'Adventure rarely reaches its predetermined end. Columbus never reached China. But he discovered America.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Can one make the future a substitute for the present? And what guarantee have we that the future will be any better if we neglect the present?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Perhaps I am a bear, or some hibernating animal underneath, for the instinct to be half asleep all winter is so strong in me.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I would like to achieve a state of inner spiritual grace from which I could function and give as I was meant to in the eye of God.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Prison life taught him how little one can get along with, and what extraordinary spiritual freedom and peace such simplification can bring. I remember again, ironically, that today more of us in the world have the luxury of choice between simplicity and complication of life. And for the most part, we, who could choose simplicity, choose complication. War, prison, survival periods, enforce a form of simplicity on us. The monk and the nun choose it of their own free will. But if one accidentally finds it, as I have for a few days, one finds also the serenity it brings.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

the final lesson of learning to be independent - widowhood ... is the hardest lesson of all.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

How one hates to think of oneself as alone. How one avoids it. It seems to imply rejection or unpopularity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Why is life speeded up so? Why are things so terribly, unbearably precious that you can't enjoy them but can only wait breathless in dread of their going?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

We tend not to choose the unknown, which might be a shock or a disappointment or simply a little difficult to cope with. An yet it is the unknown with all its disappointments and surprises that is the most enriching.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I am beginning to respect the apathetic days. Perhaps they're a necessary pause: better to give in to them than to fight them at your desk hopelessly; then you lose both the day and your self-respect. Treat them as physical phenomena -- casually -- and obey them.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I believe that what woman resents is not so much giving herself in pieces as giving herself purposelessly. What we fear is not so much our energy may be leaking away through small outlets as that it may be going “down the drain.” We do not see the results of our giving as concretely as man does his work. In the job of home-keeping there is no raise from the boss, and seldom praise from others to show us we have hit the mark. Except for the child, woman’s creation is often invisible, especially today.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

We insist on permanency, on continuity, when the only continuity possible is in growth, in freedom, in the sense that the dancers are free, barely touching as they pass but partners in the same pattern. The only real security in a relationship lies neither in looking back in nostalgia, nor forward with dread or anticipation, but living in the present and accepting the relationship as it is now.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

We have so little faith in the ebb and flow of life, of love, of relationships. We leap at the flow of time and resist in terror its ebb. We are afraid it will never return. We insist on permanency, on duration, on continuity; when the only continuity possible in life, as in love, is in growth, in fluidity - in freedom.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

And then, some morning in the second week, the mind wakes, comes to life again. Not in a city sense—no—but beach-wise. It begins to drift, to play, to turn over in gentle careless rolls like those lazy waves on the beach. One never knows what chance treasures these easy unconscious rollers may toss up, on the smooth white sand of the conscious mind; what perfectly rounded stone, what rare shell from the ocean floor. Perhaps a channeled whelk, a moon shell, or even an argonaut.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Parting is inevitably painful, even for a short time. It's like an amputation, I feel a limb is being torn off, without which I shall be unable to function. And yet, once it is done... life rushes back into the void, richer, more vivid and fuller than before.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Out of the welter of life, a few people are selected for us by the accident of temporary confinement in the same circle. We never would have chosen these neighbors; life chose them for us. But thrown together on this island of living, we stretch to understand each other and are invigorated by the stretching. The difficulty with big city environment is that if we select—and we must in order to live and breathe and work in such crowded conditions—we tend to select people like ourselves, a very monotonous diet. All hors d’oeuvres and no meat; or all sweets and no vegetables, depending on the kind of people we are. But however much the diet may differ between us, one thing is fairly certain: we usually select the known, seldom the strange. We tend not to choose the unknown which might be a shock or a disappointment or simply a little difficult to cope with. And yet it is the unknown with all its disappointments and surprises that is the most enriching.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

I feel I should not be ... so at the mercy of people's regard. And yet - it is the artist's desire for communication too; without the answering voice you get so numb; you lose faith in your powers to communicate.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

The loneliness you get by the sea is personal and alive. It doesn't subdue you and make you feel abject. It's stimulating loneliness.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

We walk up the beach under the stars. And when we are tired of walking, we lie flat on the sand under a bowl of stars. We feel stretched, expanded to take in their compass. They pour into us until we are filled with stars, up to the brim.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Good communication is just as stimulating as black coffee, and just as hard to sleep after.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Is there anything as horrible as starting on a trip? Once you're off, that's all right, but the last moments are earthquake and convulsion, and the feeling that you are a snail being pulled off your rock.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Anne Morrow Lindbergh

When the wedding march sounds the resolute approach, the clock no longer ticks, it tolls the hour. The figures in the aisle are no longer individuals, they symbolize the human race.