Best 97 of Dalai Lama Xiv quotes - MyQuotes

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Dalai Lama Xiv
By Anonym 17 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

One can be deceived by three types of laziness: the laziness of indolence, which is the wish to procrastinate; the laziness of inferiority, which is doubting your capabilities; and the laziness that is attachment to negative actions, or putting great effort into non-virtue.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The problem is that our world and our education remain focused exclusively on external, materialistic values. We are not concerned enough with inner values. Those who grow up with this kind of education live in a materialistic life and eventually the whole society becomes materialistic. But this culture is not sufficient to tackle our human problems. The real problem is here," the Dalai Lama said, pointed to his head. The Archbishop tapped his chest with his fingers to emphasize the heart as well. "And here," the Dalai Lama echoed. "Mind and heart..

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The greatest degree of inner tranquility conies from the development of love, and compassion.   Cultivating closeness and warmth for others automatically puts the mind at ease. It is the ultimate source of success in life.   True compassion is not just an emotional response but a firm commitment founded on reason. Therefore, a truly compassionate attitude towards others does not change even if they behave negatively

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The theory of emptiness…is the deep recognition that there is a fundamental disparity between the way we perceive the world, including our own existence in it, and the way things actually are.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

If there is regret and an awareness of the intention not to repeat it, and an awareness of the lack of a true identity of the mind that performed the action, or familiarity with the lack of a true identity of all phenomena, that person's morality can be said to be pure.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Those questions which are unexpected and complicated are the ones I appreciate most. They can help me a great deal. as I am compelled to take an interest in something that might not otherwise have occurred to me.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

For a considerable portion of humanity today, it is possible and indeed likely that one's neighbor, one's colleague, or one's employer will have a different mother tongue, eat different food, and follow a different religion than oneself. It is a matter of great urgency, therefore, that we find ways to cooperate with one another in a spirit of mutual acceptance and respect. In such a world, I feel, it is vital for us to find genuinely sustainable and universal approach to ethics, inner values, and personal integrity-an approach that can transcend religious, cultural, and racial differences and appeal to people at a sustainable, universal approach is what I call the project of secular ethics. All religions, therefore, to some extent, ground the cultivation of inner values and ethical awareness in some kind of metaphysical (that is, not empirically demonstrable) understanding of the world and of life after death. And just as the doctrine of divine judgment underlies ethical teachings in many theistic religions, so too does the doctrine of karma and future lives in non-theistic religions. As I see it, spirituality has two dimensions. The first dimension, that of basic spiritual well-being-by which I mean inner mental and emotional strength and balance-does not depend on religion but comes from our innate human nature as beings with a natural disposition toward compassion, kindness, and caring for others. The second dimension is what may be considered religion-based spirituality, which is acquired from our upbringing and culture and is tied to particular beliefs and practices. The difference between the two is something like the difference between water and tea. On this understanding, ethics consists less of rules to be obeyed than of principles for inner self-regulation to promote those aspects of our nature which we recognize as conducive to our own well-being and that of others. It is by moving beyond narrow self-interest that we find meaning, purpose, and satisfaction in life.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Water may be extremely dirty, yet its nature remains clear.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

It became clear that this man, although supposedly my enemy, was in fact just another human being, an ordinary person like myself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Determination, courage and self-confidence are the key factors for success

By Anonym 20 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Whether our action is wholesome or unwholesome depends on whether that action or deed arises from a disciplined or undisciplined state of mind. It is felt that a disciplined mind leads to happiness and an undisciplined mind leads to suffering, and in fact it is said that bringing about discipline within one's mind is the essence of the Buddha's teaching.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

I think maximum lifespan is about a hundred years. Compared to human history, a hundred years is quite short. So if we utilize that short period to create more problems on this planet, our life would be meaningless. ..., so we need to use our days wisely, to make our world a little better for everyone.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The purpose of religion is to control yourself, not to criticise others.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Perhaps our synagogues, our temples, and our churches," Archbishop Tutu added, "are not as welcoming as they should be. I really think that we do need for these fellowships to do a great deal more to have those who are lonely come and share. Not in an aggressive way, or in order, as it were, to increase their records or their ranks, but really just keenly interested in one person who comes and gets what they did not have before--warmth and fellowship. ...

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

[Through practice] we can get to the point where some disturbance may occur but the negative effects on our mind remain on the surface, like the waves that may ripple on the surface of an ocean but don’t have much effect deep down.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

I took note of the Buddha's teaching that in one sense a supposed enemy is more valuable than a friend, for an enemy teaches you things, such as forbearance, that a friend generally does not.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

One of the key inspirational prayers that Buddhists make on a daily basis is: 'May anyone who comes into contact with me, whether they hear about me or they see me or they think about me, experience a benefit and happiness.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Wenn du verlierst, verliere nicht den Lerneffekt.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

We are attached to friends and relatives because of the temporary benefit they have brought us in this life. We hate our enemies because of some harm they have inflicted on us. People are not our friends from birth, but become so due to circumstances. Neither were our enemies born hostile. Such relationships are not at all reliable. In the course of our lives, our best friend today can turn our to be our worst enemy tomorrow. And a much hated enemy can change into our most trusted friend. Moreover, if we talk about our many lives in the past, the unreliability of this relationship is all the more apparent. For these reasons, our animosity toward enemies and attachment toward friends merely exhibits a narrow-minded attitude that can only see some temporary and fleeting advantage. On the contrary, when we view things from a broader perspective with more farsightedness, equanimity will dawn in our minds, enabling us to see the futility of hostility and clinging desire.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Creating peace is our responsibility. To pray for peace while still engaging in the causes that give rise to violence is contradictory.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

This is my simple religion. No need for temples. No need for complicated philosophy. Your own mind, your own heart is the temple. Your philosophy is simple kindness.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

How we fare in any given situation depends on the conduct of our body, speech, and mind. Since mind is the chief, a disciplined mind is essential.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

If a person shows anger to you, and you show anger in return, the result is disaster. If you nurse hatred, you will never be happy, even in the lap of luxury. By contrast, if you control your anger and show its opposite - love, compassion, tolerance, and patience - then not only do you remain in peace, but gradually the anger of others also will diminish.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Sometimes when I meet old friends, it reminds me how quickly time passes. And it makes me wonder if we've utilized our time properly or not. Proper utilization of time is so important. While we have this body, and especially this amazing human brain, I think every minute is something precious. Our day-to-day existence is very much alive with hope, although there is no guarantee of our future. There is no guarantee that tomorrow at this time we will be here. But we are working for that purely on the basis of hope. So, we need to make the best use of our time. I believe that the proper utilization of time is this: if you can, serve other people, other sentient beings. If not, at least refrain from harming them. I think that is the whole basis of my philosophy. So, let us reflect what is truly of value in life, what gives meaning to our lives, and set our priorities on the basis of that. The purpose of our life needs to be positive. We weren't born with the purpose of causing trouble, harming others. For our life to be of value, I think we must develop basic good human qualities—warmth, kindness, compassion. Then our life becomes meaningful and more peaceful—happier.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

War is massacre. It is 100 per cent negative.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

As long as there is a lack of the inner discipline that brings calmness of mind, no matter what external facilities or conditions you have, they will never give you the feeling of joy and happiness that you are seeking. On the other hand, if you possess this inner quality, a calmness of mind, a degree of stability within, then even if you lack various external facilities that you would normally consider necessary for happiness, it is still possible to live a happy and joyful life.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

As a Buddhist, I see no distinction between religious practice and daily life. Religious practice is a twenty-four hour occupation.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Violence can only breed more violence and suffering. Our struggle must remain non-violent and free of hatred.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. And be kinder than is necessary.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The Dalai Lama, when asked what surprised him most about humanity, he said: 'Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present; the result being that he does not live in the present or the future; he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

From the Buddhist point of view, all living beings -- that is, beings with feelings, experiences, and sensations -- are considered equal. Human beings can live without eating meat. As human beings, I think that deep down our nature tends towards vegetarianism and leads us to do everything in our power to prevent harming other species.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

On the philosophical level, both Buddhism and modern science share a deep suspicion of any notion of absolutes, whether conceptualize as a transcendent being, as an eternal, unchanging principle such as soul, or as a fundamental substratum of reality. ... In the Buddhist investigation of reality, at least in principle, empirical evidence should triumph over scriptural authority, no matter how deeply venerated a scripture may be. ~ 14th Dalai Lama in his talk to the Society for Neuroscience in 2005 in Washington.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

We stand firm against the wrong not only to protect those who are being harmed but also to protect the person who is harming others, because eventually they, too, will suffer. So it's out of a sense of concern for their own long-term well-being that we stop their wrongdoing.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Weapons never stay in their boxes. Once a weapon has been manufactured, sooner or later someone will use it. If it were possible to bring about true and lasting peace by force of arms, then we should turn all our factories into weapons factories. But that is impossible. Even though it is difficult to try to bring about peace through inner transformation, it is the only way of establishing sustainable peace in the world.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

So many wars have been fought and so much injustice has been perpetrated because we've banished others from our group and therefore our circle of concern.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

We are part of the same society. We are part of the same humanity. When humanity is happy, we will be happy. When humanity is peaceful, our own lives are peaceful. ... We must develop the sense of 'we'. Once you're able to develop that sense of common humanity and the oneness of humanity, then naturally you will want all others to be free from suffering and enjoy happiness. The desire for happiness is a natural instinct shared by everyone.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

When you open yourself up mentally, you do so only with someone you trust from the bottom of your heart, someone you feel very close to. To open yourself up in this way is an important step in overcoming mental problems.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

As for my own religious practice, I try to live my life pursuing what I call the Bodhisattva ideal. According to Buddhist thought, a Bodhisattva is someone on the path to Buddhahood wo dedicates themselves entirely to helping all other sentient beings towards release from suffering. The word Bodhisattva can best be understood by translating the Bodhi and Sattva separately: Bodhi means the understanding or wisdom of the ultimate nature of reality, and a Sattva is someone who is motivated by universal compassion. The Bodhissatva ideal is thus the aspiration to practise infinite compassion with infinite wisdom. releasing sentient beings from suffering.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

I asked the Dalai Lama what it was like to wake up with joy, and he shared his experience each morning. 'I think if you are an intensely religious believer, as soon as you wake up, you thank God for another day. And you try to do God’s will. For a nontheist like myself, but who is a Buddhist, as soon as I wake up, I remember Buddha’s teaching: the importance of kindness and compassion, wishing something good for others, or at least to reduce their suffering. Then I remember that everything is interrelated, the teaching of interdependence. So then I set my intention for the day: that this day should be meaningful. Meaningful means, if possible, serve and help others. If not possible, then at least not to harm others. That’s a meaningful day.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

It seems that scientific research reaches deeper and deeper. But it also seems that more and more people, at least scientists, are beginning to realize that the spiritual factor is important. I say 'spiritual' without meaning any particular religion or faith, just simple warmhearted compassion, human affection, and gentleness. It is as if such warmhearted people are a bit more humble, a little bit more content. I consider spiritual values primary, and religion secondary. As I see it, the various religions strengthen these basic human qualities. As a practitioner of Buddhism, my practice of compassion and my practice of Buddhism are actually one and the same. But the practice of compassion does not require religious devotion or religious faith; it can be independent from the practice of religion. Therefore, the ultimate source of happiness for human society very much depends on the human spirit, on spiritual values. If we do not combine science and these basic human values, then scientific knowledge may sometimes create troubles, even disaster....

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Each one of us is responsible for reducing the negative potential of every situation we have to face.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

...[A]ccording to Buddhism in the Tibetan tradition, a being that achieves Buddhahood, although freed from Samsara,the 'wheel of suffering', as the phenomenon of existence is known, will continue to return to work for the benefit of all other sentient beings until such time as each one is similarly liberated.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

...the very "purpose of life" - the goal of avoiding suffering and discovering happiness.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

So when we think about the future, how to build a healthy humanity, we really have to think about how we create a new generation of citizens with a different kind of mind-set. Here education is really the key. Christianity has wonderful teachings, so does Buddhism, but these teachings and approaches are not sufficient. Now secular education is universal. So now we must include in formal education of our youth some teaching of compassion and basic ethics, not on the basis of religious belief but on the basis of scientific findings and our common sense and our universal experience. ... to educate children about the value of compassion and the value of applying our mind.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

The ultimate source of comfort and peace is within ourselves.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

In the end, the innate desire of all people for truth, justice, and human understanding must triumph over ignorance and despair.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Can there be a completely different set of laws of physics in a different universe, or do the laws of physics as we understand them hold true in all possible universes? If the answer is that a different set of laws can operate in a different universe system, this would suggest (from a Buddhist perspective) that even the laws of physics are entangled with the karma of the sentient beings that will arise in that universe.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Ich kenne keine Feinde. Es gibt nur Menschen, die ich noch nicht kennengelernt habe.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

[T]he conflict that triggered the anger should not be dealt with until the anger subsides. Anger is a message that there is a problem to be dealt with . . . later.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Dalai Lama Xiv

Those who have little interest in spirituality shouldn’t think that human inner values don’t apply to you. The inner peace of an alert and calm mind are the source of real happiness and good health. Our human intelligence tells us which of our emotions are positive and helpful and which are damaging and to be restrained or avoided. - 12/7/2012 on his Facebook page