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Henry David Thoreau
By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The volatile truth of our words should continually betray the inadequacy of the residual statement.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The finest workers in stone are not copper or steel tools, but the gentle touches of air and water working at their leisure with a liberal allowance of time.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Perhaps the facts most astounding and most real are never communicated by man to man. The true harvest of my daily life is somewhat as intangible and indescribable as the tints of morning or evening. It is a little star-dust caught, a segment of the rainbow which I have clutched.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The study of geometry is a petty and idle exercise of the mind, if it is applied to no larger system than the starry one. Mathematics should be mixed not only with physics but with ethics; that is mixed mathematics.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Time & Co. are, after all, the only quite honest and trustworthy publishers that we know.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

I love Nature partly because she is not man, but a retreat from him. None of his institutions control or pervade her. There a different kind of right prevails. In her midst I can be glad with an entire gladness. If this world were all man, I could not stretch myself, I should lose all hope. He is constraint, she is freedom to me. He makes me wish for another world. She makes me content with this.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The country is an archipelago of lakes,--the lake-country of New England.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

When the leaves fall, the whole earth is a cemetery pleasant to walk in. I love to wander and muse over them in their graves. Here are no lying nor vain epitaphs.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Truth is his inspirer, and earnestness the polisher of his sentences. He could afford to lose his Sharp's rifles, while he retained his faculty of speech,--a Sharp's rifle of infinitely surer and longer range.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is surprising how many great men and women a small house will contain. I have had twenty-five or thirty souls, with their bodies, at once under my roof, and yet we often parted without being aware that we had come very near to one another.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Every tree sends its fibres forth in search of the Wild. The cities import it at any price. Men plow and sail for it. From the forest and wilderness come the tonics and barks which brace mankind.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

I sometimes despair of getting anything quite simple and honest done in this world by the help of men. They would have to be passed through a powerful press first, to squeeze their old notions out of them, so that they would not soon get upon their legs again.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Nature, even when she is scant and thin outwardly, satisfies us still by the assurance of a certain generosity at the roots.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

I have never met with a friend who furnished me sea-room. I have only tacked a few times and come to anchor - not sailed - made no voyage, carried no venture.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Man is the artificer of his own happiness.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

He who eats the fruit should at least plant the seed; ay, if possible, a better seed than that whose fruit he has enjoyed.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

We are sometimes made aware of a kindness long passed, and realize that there have been times when our friends' thoughts of us were of so pure and lofty a character that they passed over us like the winds of heaven unnoticed; when they treated us not as what we were, but as what we aspired to be.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

You may raise enough money to tunnel a mountain, but you cannot raise money enough to hire a man who is minding his own business.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The success of great scholars and thinkers is commonly a courtier-like success, not kingly, not manly. They make shift to live merely by conformity, practically as their fathers did, and are in no sense the progenitors of a nobler race of men.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is impossible to say all that we think, even to our truest Friend. We may bid him farewell forever sooner than complain, for our complaint is too well grounded to be uttered.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

There is nothing more difficult to find than oneself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Individuals, like nations, must have suitable broad and natural boundaries, even a considerable neutral ground, between them.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Action from principle, the perception and the performance of right, changes things and relations; it is essentially revolutionary, and does not consist wholly with anything which was. It not only divides States and churches, it divides families; ay, it divides the individual, separating the diabolical in him from the divine.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The most alive is the wildest.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

What sort of philosophers are we, who know absolutely nothing of the origin and destiny of cats?

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The schools begin with what they call the elements, and where do they end?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Birds do not sing in caves, nor do doves cherish their innocence in dovecots.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Decay and disease are often beautiful, like the pearly tear of the shellfish and the hectic glow of consumption.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The ocean is a wilderness reaching round the globe, wilder than a Bengal jungle, and fuller of monsters, washing the very wharves of our cities and the gardens of our sea-side residences.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Who hears the fishes when they cry?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The forests are held cheap after the white pine has been culled out; and the explorers and hunters pray for rain only to clear theatmosphere of smoke.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

I was daily intoxicated, yet no man could call me intemperate.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

There may be an excess of cultivation as well as of anything else, until civilization becomes pathetic. A highly cultivated man,--all whose bones can be bent! whose heaven-born virtues are but good manners!

By Anonym 19 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Thu luxury of one class is counterbalanced by the indigence of another.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is a very true and expressive phrase, "He looked daggers at me," for the first pattern and prototype of all daggers must have been a glance of the eye.... It is wonderful how we get about the streets without being wounded by these delicate and glancing weapons, a man can so nimbly whip out his rapier, or without being noticed carry it unsheathed. Yet it is rare that one gets seriously looked at.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

A stranger may easily detect what is strange to the oldest inhabitant, for the strange is his province.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Do we call this the land of the free? What is it to be free from King George the Fourth and continue the slaves of prejudice? What is it to be born free and equal, and not to live? What is the value of any political freedom, but as a means to moral freedom?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

If some are prosecuted for abusing children, others deserve to be prosecuted for maltreating the face of nature committed to their care.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Cast your whole vote, not a piece of paper merely, but your whole influence. A minority is powerless when it conforms to a majority; but is irresistable when it clogs by its whole weight. If the alternative is to keep all just men in prison, or give up war and slavery, the State will not hesitate which to choose.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

If it is surely the means to the highest end we know, can any work be humble or disgusting? Will it not rather be elevating as a ladder, the means by which we are translated?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Nature seemed to have adorned herself for our departure with a profusion of fringes and curls, mingled with the bright tints of flowers, reflected in the water. But we missed the white water-lily, which is the queen of river flowers, its reign being over for this season.... Many of this species inhabit our Concord water.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Perhaps the facts most astounding and most real are never communicated by man to man.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is remarkable that, notwithstanding the universal favor with which the New Testament is outwardly received, and even the bigotry with which it is defended, there is no hospitality shown to, there is no appreciation of, the order of truth with which it deals.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Most of the stone a nation hammers goes toward its tomb only. It buries itself alive.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

A thoroughbred business man cannot enter heartily upon the business of life without first looking into his accounts.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

Stuff a cold and starve a cold are but two ways. They are the two practices, both always in full blast. Yet you must take the advice of the one school as if there was no other.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

The biggest happiness is when at the end of the year you feel better than at the beginning

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is remarkable, but on the whole, perhaps, not to be lamented, that the world is so unkind to a new book. Any distinguished traveler who comes to our shores is likely to get more dinners and speeches of welcome than he can well dispose of, but the best books, if noticed at all, meet with coldness and suspicion, or, what is worse, gratuitous, off-hand criticism.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

It is tranquil people who accomplish much.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry David Thoreau

I do not see why the schoolmaster should be taxed to support the priest, and not the priest the schoolmaster.