Best 674 of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Thou shalt learn The wisdom early to discern True beauty in utility.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The morning pouring everywhere, its golden glory on the air.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The setting of a great hope is like the setting of the sun. The brightness of our life is gone. Shadows of evening fall around us, and the world seems but a dim reflection - itself a broader shadow. We look forward into the coming lonely night. The soul withdraws into itself. Then stars arise, and the night is holy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear, Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Life hath quicksands, Life hath snares!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Dead he is not, but departed, for the artist never dies.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The country is not priest-ridded, but press-ridden.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Even He that died for us upon the cross, in the last hour, in the unutterable agony of death, was mindful of His mother, as if to teach us that this holy love should be our last worldly thought - the last point of earth from which the soul should take its flight for heaven.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Perseverance is a great element of success.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

There's nothing in this world so sweet as love. And next to love the sweetest thing is hate.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Take this sorrow to thy heart and make it part of thee, and it shall nourish thee till thou art strong again.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

For next to being a great poet is the power of understanding one.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Some poems are like the Centaurs--a mingling of man and beast, and begotten of Ixion on a cloud.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Men are four; He who knows and knows not that he knows. He is asleep; wake him. He who knows not and knows not that he knows not. He is a fool; shun him. He who knows not and knows that he knows not. He is a child; teach him. He who knows and knows that he knows. He is a king; follow him. The heights by great men reached and kept Were not attained by sudden flight, But they, while their companions slept, Were toiling upward in the night.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Patience; accomplish thy labor; accomplish thy work of affection! Sorrow and silence are strong, and patient endurance is godlike. Therefore accomplish thy labor of love, till the heart is made godlike, Purified, strengthened, perfected, and rendered more worthy of heaven.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

It is too late! Ah, nothing is too late Till the tired heart shall cease to palpitate. Cato learned Greek at eighty; Sophocles Wrote his grand Oedipus, and Simonides Bore off the prize of verse from his compeers, When each had numbered more than fourscore years, And Theophrastus, at fourscore and ten, Had but begun his Characters of Men. Chaucer, at Woodstock with the nightingales, At sixty wrote the Canterbury Tales; Goethe at Weimar, toiling to the last, Completed Faust when eighty years were past, These are indeed exceptions; but they show How far the gulf-stream of our youth may flow Into the arctic regions of our lives. Where little else than life itself survives.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Then from the neighboring thicket the mocking-bird, wildest of singers, Swinging aloft on a willow spray that hung o'er the water, Shook from his little throat such floods of delirious music, That the whole air and the woods and the waves seemed silent to listen.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Silence is a great peacemaker.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Ambition's cradle oftenest is its grave

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The love of learning, the sequestered nooks, And all the sweet serenity of books.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Whatever poet, orator, or sage may say of it, old age is still old age.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Stars of earth, these golden flowers; emblems of our own great resurrection; emblems of the bright and better land.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Youth comes but once in a lifetime.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Not chance of birth or place has made us friends, Being oftentimes of different tongues and nations, But the endeavor for the selfsame ends, With the same hopes, and fears, and aspirations.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

To be infatuated with the power of one's own intellect is an accident which seldom happens but to those who are remarkable for the want of intellectual power. Whenever Nature leaves a hole in a person's mind, she generally plasters it over with a thick coat of self-conceit.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

If you once understand an author's character, the comprehension of his writings becomes easy.

By Anonym 17 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

One if by land, two if by sea.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Art is the gift of God, and must be used unto His glory.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Art is the child of Nature.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Even the blackest of them all, the crow, Renders good service as your man-at-arms, Crushing the beetle in his coat of mail. And crying havoc on the slug and snail.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The bells themselves are the best of preachers, Their brazen lips are learned teachers, From their pulpits of stone, in the upper air, Sounding aloft, without crack or flaw, Shriller than trumpets under the Law, Now a sermon and now a prayer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Who dares To say that he alone has found the truth?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Gorgeous flowerets in the sunlight shining, Blossoms flaunting in the eye of day, Tremulous leaves, with soft and silver lining, Buds that open only to decay.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Thought takes man out of servitude, into freedom.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Wondrous strong are the spells of fiction.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Is this is a dream? O, if it be a dream, Let me sleep on, and do not wake me yet!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Sometimes we may learn more from a man's errors, than from his virtues.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

I am more afraid of deserving criticism than of receiving it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Midnight! the outpost of advancing day! The frontier town and citadel of night!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

For his heart was in his work, and the heart giveth grace unto every art.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

There is nothing holier in this life of ours than the first consciousness of love, the first fluttering of its silken wings.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Fortune comes well to all that comes not late.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Under the spreading chestnut tree The village smithy stands; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. . . . He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man. . . . Toiling,-rejoicing,-sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees it close; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

The air of summer was sweeter than wine.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

I heard the bells on Christmas Day Their old, familiar carols play, And wild and sweet The words repeat Of peace on earth, good-will to men!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A stiff letter galls one like a stiff shirt collar -- whilst a sheet garnished here and there with a careless blot -- and here and there a dash -- but in the main full of excellent matter, is like a clever fellow in a dirty shirt whom we value for the good humour he brings with him and not for the garb he wears.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

How in the turmoil of life can love stand, Where there is not one heart, and one mouth and one hand.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In the lives of the saddest of us, there are bright days like this, when we feel as if we could take the great world in our arms and kiss it. Then come the gloomy hours, when the fire will neither burn on our hearths nor in our hearts; and all without and within is dismal, cold, and dark. Believe me, every heart has its secret sorrows, which the world knows not, and oftentimes we call a man cold, when he is only sad.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

A solid man of Boston; A comfortable man with dividends, And the first salmon and the first green peas.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Life like an empty dream flits by.