Best 4 282 of William Shakespeare quotes - MyQuotes

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William Shakespeare
By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

To die: - to sleep: No more; and, by a sleep to say we end The heart-ache and the thousand natural shocks That flesh is heir to, 'tis a consummation Devoutly to be wished.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou seest the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed whereon it must expire Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

If love be blind, love cannot hit the mark

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

Look what thy soul holds dear, imagine it To lie that way thou goest, not whence thou com'st. Suppose the singing birds musicians, The grass whereon thou tread'st the presence strewed, The flowers fair ladies, and thy steps no more Than a delight measure or a dance; For gnarling sorrow hath less power to bite The man that mocks at it and sets it light.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Henceforth, I'll bear Affliction till it do cry out itself, 'Enough, enough, and die.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

O for a Muse of fire, that would ascend The brightest heaven of invention, A kingdom for a stage, princes to act And monarchs to behold the swelling scene! Then should the warlike Harry, like himself, Assume the port of Mars; and at his heels, Leash'd in like hounds, should famine, sword and fire Crouch for employment. But pardon, and gentles all, The flat unraised spirits that have dared On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object: can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt? O, pardon! since a crooked figure may Attest in little place a million; And let us, ciphers to this great accompt, On your imaginary forces work. Suppose within the girdle of these walls Are now confined two mighty monarchies, Whose high upreared and abutting fronts The perilous narrow ocean parts asunder: Piece out our imperfections with your thoughts; Into a thousand parts divide on man, And make imaginary puissance; Think when we talk of horses, that you see them Printing their proud hoofs i' the receiving earth; For 'tis your thoughts that now must deck our kings, Carry them here and there; jumping o'er times, Turning the accomplishment of many years Into an hour-glass: for the which supply, Admit me Chorus to this history; Who prologue-like your humble patience pray, Gently to hear, kindly to judge, our play.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

Yet nor the lays of birds nor the sweet smell Of different flowers in odour and in hue Could make me any summer's story tell, Or from their proud lap pluck them where they grew; Nor did I wonder at the lily's white, Nor praise the deep vermilion in the rose; They were but sweet, but figures of delight, Drawn after you, you pattern of all those.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Accommodated; that is, when a man is, as they say, accommodated; or when a man is, being, whereby a' may be thought to be accommodated,?which is an excellent thing.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

This tyrant, whose sole name blisters our tongues,Was once thought honest.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Beauty itself doth of itself persuade the eyes of men without an orator.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

The sight of lovers feedeth those in love.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Every subject's duty is the King's; but every subject's soul is his own. Therefore, should every soldier in the wars do as every sick man in his bed, wash every mote out of his conscience; and dying so, death is to him advantage; or not dying, the time was blessedly lost wherein such preparation was gained; and in him that escapes, it were no sin to think that, making God so free an offer, He let him outlive the day to see His greatness and to teach others how they should prepare.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

I fill up a place, which may be better... when I have made it empty.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

Te veo preocupado, hijo mío, y como abatido. Recobra el ánimo. Nuestra fiesta ha terminado. Los actores, como ya te dije, eran espíritus y se han disuelto en el aire, en aire leve, y, cual la obra sin cimientos de esta fantasía, las torres con sus nubes, los regios palacios, los templos solemnes, el inmenso mundo y cuantos lo hereden, todo se disipará e, igual que se ha esfumado mi etérea función, no quedará ni polvo. Somos de la misma sustancia que los sueños, y nuestra breve vida culmina en un dormir. Estoy turbado. Disculpa mi flaqueza; mi mente está agitada. No te inquiete mi dolencia. Si gustas, retírate a mi celda y reposa. Pasearé un momento por calmar mi ánimo excitado. (Próspero)

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

All hail, great master! grave sir, hail! I come To answer thy best pleasure; be't to fly, To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride On the curl'd clouds, to thy strong bidding task Ariel and all his quality

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

My business was great, and in such a case as mine a man may strain courtesy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

No worse a husband than the best of men.

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

Speed. O jest unseen, inscrutable, invisible, As a nose on a man's face, or a weathercock on a steeple! My master sues to her, and she hath taught her suitor, He being her pupil, to become her tutor. O excellent device! was there ever heard a better, That my master, being scribe, to himself should write the letter? Valentine. How now, sir? what are you reasoning with yourself? Speed. Nay, I was rhyming: 'tis you that have the reason.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

My crown is in my heart, not on my head; not decked with diamonds and Indian stones, nor to be seen: my crown is called content, a crown it is that seldom kings enjoy.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

Lovers ever run before the clock

By Anonym 18 Sep

William Shakespeare

She will outstrip all praise and make it halt behind her.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

And this our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything. I would not change it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Fight to the last gasp.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

This is the short and the long of it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

As full of spirit as the month of May, and as gorgeous as the sun in Midsummer.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

To show our simple skill, That is the true beginning of our end.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

A woman that is like a German clock, Still a-repairing, ever out of frame, And never going aright, being a watch, But being watched that it may still go right!

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

The single and peculiar mind is bound With all the strength and armor of the mind To keep itself from noyance, but much more That spirit upon whose weal depends and rests The lives of many. The cess of majesty Dies not alone, but like a gulf doth draw What's near it with it; or it is a massy wheel Fixed on the summit of the highest mount, To whose huge spokes ten thousand lesser things Are mortised and adjoined, which, when it falls, Each small annexment, petty consequence, Attends the boist'rous ruin. Never alone Did the king sigh, but with a general groan.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

LEONATO Neighbours, you are tedious. DOGBERRY It pleases your worship to say so, but we are the poor duke's officers; but truly, for mine own part, if I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.

By Anonym 17 Sep

William Shakespeare

I would forget it fain, But oh, it presses to my memory, Like damnèd guilty deeds to sinners' minds.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

But I am bound upon a wheel of fire, that mine own tears do scald like moulten lead.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

It is thyself, mine own self's better part; Mine eye's clear eye, my dear heart's dearer heart; My food, my fortune, and my sweet hope's aim, My sole earth's heaven, and my heaven's claim.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

Petruchio: Come, come, you wasp; i' faith, you are too angry. Katherine: If I be waspish, best beware my sting. Petruchio: My remedy is then, to pluck it out. Katherine: Ay, if the fool could find where it lies. Petruchio: Who knows not where a wasp does wear his sting? In his tail. Katherine: In his tongue. Petruchio: Whose tongue? Katherine: Yours, if you talk of tails: and so farewell. Petruchio: What, with my tongue in your tail? Nay, come again, Good Kate; I am a gentleman.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

Let the sap of reason quench the fire of passion.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

Who riseth from a feast With that keen appetite that he sits down?

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

Time ... thou ceaseless lackey to eternity.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

The smallest worm will turn being trodden on, And doves will peck in safeguard of their brood.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Excellent wretch! Perdition catch my soul But I do love thee! and when I love thee not, Chaos is come again.

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

He is dead and gone, lady, He is dead and gone; At his head a grass-green turf, At his heels a stone.

By Anonym 19 Sep

William Shakespeare

The quality of mercy is not strained; It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed; It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes. 'Tis mightiest in the mightiest; it becomes The throned monarch better than his crown; * * * * * It is enthroned in the hearts of kings; It is an attribute to God himself.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

What showers arise, blown with the windy tempest of my heart

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

I'll not meddle with it; it is a dangerous thing; it makes a man a coward; a man cannot steal, but it accuseth him; a man cannot swear, but it checks him; a man cannot lie with his neighbor's wife, but it detects him. 'Tis a blushing, shame -faced spirit, that mutinies in a man's bosom ; it fills one full of obstacles; it made me once restore a purse of gold that by chance I found; it beggars any man that keeps it; it is turned out of all towns and cities for a dangerous thing; and every man that means to live well endeavors to trust to himself and live without it.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

Thine eyes I love, and they, as pitying me, Knowing thy heart torment me with disdain, Have put on black and loving mourners be, Looking with pretty ruth upon my pain. And truly not the morning sun of heaven Better becomes the grey cheeks of the east, Nor that full star that ushers in the even, Doth half that glory to the sober west, As those two mourning eyes become thy face: O! let it then as well beseem thy heart To mourn for me since mourning doth thee grace, And suit thy pity like in every part. Then will I swear beauty herself is black, And all they foul that thy complexion lack

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

Bondage is hoarse, and may not speak aloud.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

It is to be all made of fantasy, All made of passion and all made of wishes, All adoration, duty, and observance, All humbleness, all patience and impatience, All purity, all trial, all observance

By Anonym 13 Sep

William Shakespeare

But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.

By Anonym 14 Sep

William Shakespeare

Kindness nobler ever than revenge.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

And 'tis a kind of good deed to say well: And yet words are no deeds. King Henry VIII. Act 3, Scene 2

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

The sands are number'd that make up my life; Here must I stay, and here my life must end.

By Anonym 15 Sep

William Shakespeare

You are a tedious fool.