Best 106 of Susanna Clarke quotes - MyQuotes

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Susanna Clarke
By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Strange bent over these things, with a concentration to rival Minervois's own, questioning, criticizing and proposing. Strange and the two engravers spoke French to each other. To Strange's surprize Childermass understood perfectly and even addressed one or twoquestions to Minervois in his own language. Unfortunately, Childermass's French was so strongly accented by his native Yorkshire that Minervois did not understand and asked Strange if Childermass was Dutch.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Strange bent over these things, with a concentration to rival Minervois's own, questioning, criticizing and proposing. Strange and the two engravers spoke French to each other. To Strange's surprize Childermass understood perfectly and even addressed one or two questions to Minervois in his own language. Unfortunately, Childermass's French was so strongly accented by his native Yorkshire that Minervois did not understand and asked Strange if Childermass was Dutch.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Unfortunately, Childermass's French was so strongly accented by his native Yorkshire that Minervois did not understand and asked Strange if Childermass was Dutch.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I was told once by some country people that a magician should never tell his dreams because the telling will make them come true. But I say that is great nonsense.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Susanna Clarke

There is nothing in the world so easy to explain as failure. It is, after all, what everyone does all the time.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Excess of grief may bring on quite as fine a bout of madness an an excess of any thing else. Truth to tell, I was not quite myself for a time. Truth to tell, I was a little wild.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He smiles but rarely and watches other men to see when they laugh and then does the same.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I have a scholar's love of silence and solitude. To sit and pass hour after hour in idle chatter with a roomful of strangers is to me the worst sort of torment.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He understood for the first time that the world is not dumb at all, but merely waiting for someone to speak to it in a language it understands.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I have been quite put out of temper this morning and someone ought to die for it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

For, though the room was silent, the silence of half a hundred cats is a peculiar thing, like fifty individual silences all piled one on top of another.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Ah, but sir,' said Lascelles, 'it is precisely by passing judgments upon other people's work and pointing out their errors that readers can be made to understand your own opinions better. It is the easiest thing in the world to turn a review to one's own ends. One only need mention the book once or twice and for the rest of the article one may develop one's theme just as one chuses. It is, I assure you, what every body else does.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

To be more precise it was the color of heartache.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

There is nothing else in magic but the wild thought of the bird as it casts itself into the void. There is no creature upon the earth with such potential for magic. Even the least of them may fly straight out of this world and come by chance to the Other Lands. Where does the wind come from that blows upon your face, that fans the pages of your book? Where the harum-scarum magic of small wild creatures meets the magic of Man, where the language of the wind and the rain and the trees can be understood, there we will find the Raven King.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Woods were ringed with a colour so soft, so subtle that it could scarcely be said to be a colour at all. It was more the idea of a colour - as if the trees were dreaming green dreams or thinking green thoughts.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Bright yellow leaves flowed swiftly upon the dark, almost-black water, making patterns as they went. To Mr. Segundus the patterns looked a little like magical writing. 'But then,' he thought, 'So many things do.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I have no cause to love Mr. Norrell- far from it. But I know this about him: he is a magician first and everything else second- and Jonathan is the same. Books and magic are all either of them really care about.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I mean that two of any thing is a most uncomfortable number. One may do as he pleases. Six may get along well enough. But two must always struggle for mastery. Two must always watch each other. The eyes of all the world will be on two, uncertain which of them to follow.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

There must come a time when the bullets will run out

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He gave her his heart. She took it and placed it quietly in the pocket of her gown. No one observed what she did.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

You mean to say he became mad deliberately?' ...Nothing is more likely,' said the duke.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I was always amazed at Cambridge how quickly people appeared to take offence at everything I said, but now I see plainly that it was not my words they hated - it was this fairy face. The dark alchemy of this face turns all my gentle human emotions into fierce fairy vices. Inside I am all despair, but this face shows only fairy scorn. My remorse becomes fairy fury and my pensiveness is turned to fairy cunning.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

There was very little about her face and figure that was in any way remarkable, but it was the sort of face which, when animated by conversation or laughter, is completely transformed. She had a lovely disposition, a quick mind and a fondness for the comical. She was always very ready to smile and, since a smile is the most becoming ornament that any lady can wear, she had been known upon occasion to outshine women who were acknowledged beauties in three countries.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He had discovered that it was easier – far easier than any one could have supposed – to make oneself mad, but like all magic it was full of obstacles and frustrations. Even if he succeeded in summoning the fairy (which did not seem very likely), he would be in no condition to talk to him. Every book he had ever read on the subject urged magicians to be on their guard when dealing with fairies. Just when he needed all his wits, he would have scarcely any wits at all.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Magic, madam, is like wine and, if you are not used to it, it will make you drunk.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He hardly ever spoke of magic, and when he did it was like a history lesson and no one could bear to listen to him.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Susanna Clarke

The first dinner-party of a bride's career is a momentous occasion, entailing a world of small anxieties. The accomplishments which have won her acclaim in the three years since she left the schoolroom are no longer enough. It is no longer enough to dress exquisitely, to chuse jewels exactly appropriate to the situation, to converse in French, to play the pianoforte and sing. Now she must turn her attention to French cooking and French wines. Though other people may advise her upon these important matters, her own taste and inclinations must guide her. She is sure to despise her mother's style of entertaining and wish to do things differently. In London fashionable people dine out four, five times a week. However will a new bride - nineteen years old and scarcely ever in a kitchen before - think of a meal to astonish and delight such jaded palates?

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Some years ago there was in the city of York a society of magicians. They met upon the third Wednesday of every month and read each other long, dull papers upon the history of English magic.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Such nonsense!" declared Dr Greysteel. "Whoever heard of cats doing anything useful!" "Except for staring at one in a supercilious manner," said Strange. "That has a sort of moral usefulness, I suppose, in making one feel uncomfortable and encouraging sober reflection upon one's imperfections.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Yet it is true—skin can mean a great deal. Mine means that any man may strike me in a public place and never fear the consequences. It means that my friends do not always like to be seen with me in the street. It means that no matter how many books I read, or languages I master, I will never be anything but a curiosity—like a talking pig or a mathematical horse.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

There is nothing in the world so easy to explain as failure - it is, after all, what everybody does all the time.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

All books are doors; and some of them are wardrobes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

What nobility of feeling! To sacrifice your own pleasure to preserve the comfort of others! It is a thing, I confess, that would never occur to me.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

It was an old fashioned house --the sort of house in fact, as Strange expressed it, which a lady in a novel might like to be persecuted in.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Susanna Clarke

If I were you, Mr Lascelles," said Childermass, softly, "I would speak more guardedly. You are in the north now. In John Uskglass's own country. Our towns and cities and abbeys were built by him. Our laws were made by him. He is in our minds and hearts and speech. Were it summer you would see a carpet of tiny flowers beneath every hedgerow, of a bluish-white colour. We call them John's Farthings. When the weather is contrary and we have warm weather in winter or it rains in summer the country people say that John Uskglass is in love again and neglects his business. And when we are sure of something we say it is as safe as a pebble in John Uskglass's pocket.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Without warning a lady appeared. She came from the direction of Friday-street, for she had just been with Mr. Newbolt. She strode capably through the snow. She wore a black silk gown and something very queer swung from a silver chain about her neck. Her smile was full of comfort and her eyes were kind and happy. She was just as Mr. Newbolt had described. And the name of this lady was Death.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

But the other Ministers considered that to employ a magician was one thing, novelists were quite another and they would not stoop to it.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

He had once found himself in a room with Lady Bessborough's long-haired white cat. He happened to be dressed in an immaculate black coat and trousers, and was there thoroughly alarmed by the cat's stalking round and round and making motions as if it proposed to sit upon him. He waited until he believed himself to be unobserved, then he picked it up, opened a window, and tossed it out. Despite falling three storeys to the ground, the cat survived, but one of its legs was never quite right afterward and it always evinced the greatest dislike of gentlemen in black clothes.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Well, I suppose one ought not to employ a magician and then complain that he does not behave like other people.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

How quickly was every bad thing discovered to be the fault of the previous administration (an evil set of men who wedded general stupidity to wickedness of purpose).

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

But if you are going to take up a profession – and I cannot see why you should want one at all, now that you have come into your property – surely you can chuse something better than magic! It has no practical application.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Well, Henry, you can cease frowning at me. If I am a magician, I am a very indifferent one. Other adepts summon up fairy-spirits and long-dead kings. I appear to have conjured the spirit of a banker.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Susanna Clarke

you must learn to live as I do - in the face of constant criticism, opposition and censure. That, sir, is the English way.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

I am, as far as I can tell, about a month behind Lord Byron. In every town we stop at we discover innkeepers, postillions, officials, burghers, potboys, and all kinds and sorts of ladies whose brains still seem somewhat deranged from their brief exposure to his lordship. And though my companions are careful to tell people that I am that dreadful being, an English magician, I am clearly nothing in comparison to an English poet and everywhere I go I enjoy the reputation- quite new to me, I assure you- of the quiet, good Englishman, who makes no noise and is no trouble to any one.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

..The argument he was conducting with his neighbor as to whether the English magician had gone mad because he was a magician, or because he was English.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

And how shall I think of you?' He considered a moment and then laughed. 'Think of me with my nose in a book!

By Anonym 14 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Sing like no one is listening. Love like you’ve never been hurt. Dance like nobody’s watching, and live like it’s heaven on earth.

By Anonym 20 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Where have they gone?" "Wherever magicians used to go. Behind the sky. On the other side of the rain.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Can a magician kill a man by magic?” Lord Wellington asked Strange. Strange frowned. He seemed to dislike the question. “I suppose a magician might,” he admitted, “but a gentleman never would.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Susanna Clarke

Some time later there was a knock at his door. He was surprised to find it was now evening and the room was quite dark. The knock sounded again. The landlord was at the door. The landlord began to talk, but Strange could not understand him. This was because the man had a pineapple in his mouth. How he had managed to cram the whole thing in there, Strange could not imagine. Green, spiky leaves emerged slowly out of his mouth and then were sucked back in again as he spoke. Strange wondered if perhaps he ought to go and fetch a knife or a hook and try and fish the pineapple out, in case the landlord should choke. But at the same time he did not care much about it. 'After all,' he thought with some irritation, 'it is his own fault. He put it there.