Best 548 of Walt Whitman quotes - MyQuotes

Follow
Walt Whitman
By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

A child said What is the grass? fetching it to me with full hands; How could I answer the child? I do not know what it is any more than he.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

I believe a leaf of grass is no less than the journeywork of the stars, And the pismire is equally perfect, and a grain of sand, and the egg of the wren, And the tree toad is a chef-d'oeurve for the highest, And the running blackberry would adorn the parlors of heaven, And the narrowest hinge in my hand puts to scorn all machinery, And the cow crunching with depress'd head surpasses any statue, And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

Where the earth is, we are.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Walt Whitman

Song of myself Now I will do nothing but listen, To accrue what I hear into this song, to let sounds contribute toward it. I hear bravuras of birds, bustle of growing wheat, gossip of flames, clack of sticks cooking my meals, I hear the sound I love, the sound of the human voice, I hear all sounds running together, combined, fused or following, Sounds of the city and sounds out of the city, sounds of the day and night, Talkative young ones to those that like them, the loud laugh of work-people at their meals, The angry base of disjointed friendship, the faint tones of the sick, The judge with hands tight to the desk, his pallid lips pronouncing a death-sentence, The heave'e'yo of stevedores unlading ships by the wharves, the refrain of the anchor-lifters, The ring of alarm-bells, the cry of fire, the whirr of swift-streaking engines and hose-carts with premonitory tinkles and color'd lights, The steam-whistle, the solid roll of the train of approaching cars, The slow march play'd at the head of the association marching two and two, (They go to guard some corpse, the flag-tops are draped with black muslin.) I hear the violoncello, ('tis the young man's heart's complaint,) I hear the key'd cornet, it glides quickly in through my ears, It shakes mad-sweet pangs through my belly and breast. I hear the chorus, it is a grand opera, Ah this indeed is music--this suits me.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

That the hands of the sisters Death and Night incessantly softly wash again and ever again, this soiled world.

By Anonym 19 Sep

Walt Whitman

The poet is individual—he is complete in himself: the others are as good as he; only he sees it, and they do not.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

And as to you Corpse I think you are good manure, but that does not offend me, I smell the white roses sweet-scented and growing, I reach to the leafy lips, I reach to the polish'd breasts of melons.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

In the confusion we stay with each other, happy to be together, speaking without uttering a single word.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

Comerado, this is no book,Who touches this, touches a man,(Is it night? Are we here alone?)It is I you hold, and who holds you,I spring from the pages into your arms-decease calls me forth.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Walt Whitman

I believe in the flesh and the appetites; Seeing, hearing, feeling, are miracles, and each part and tag of me is a miracle. Divine am I inside and out, and I make holy whatever I touch or am touch’d from; The scent of these arm-pits, aroma finer than prayer; This head more than churches, bibles, and all the creeds.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

O the joy of my spirit - it is uncaged - it darts like lightning!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

What stays with you latest and deepest? of curious panics, of hard-fought engagements or sieges tremendous what deepest remains?

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

Are you the new person drawn toward me? To begin with, take warning, I am surely far different from what you suppose.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

You road I enter upon and look around, I believe you are not all that is here, I believe much unseen is also here

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Joy, shipmate, joy! (Pleased to my soul at death I cry), Our life is closed, our life begins, The long, long anchorage we leave, The ship is clear at last, she leaps! She swiftly courses from the shore, Joy, shipmate, joy!

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

A simple separate person is not contained between his hat and his boots.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

And a mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

You must not know too much or be too precise or scientific about birds and trees and flowers and watercraft; a certain free-margin , or even vagueness - ignorance, credulity - helps your enjoyment of these things.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

There can be no theory of any account unless it corroborate with the theory of the earth.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

The smallest sprout shows there is really no death. And if ever there was it led forward life, and does not wait at the end to arrest it.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

I think of few heroic actions, which cannot be traced to the artistical impulse. He who does great deeds, does them from his innate sensitiveness to moral beauty.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

I say to mankind, Be not curious about God. For I, who am curious about each, am not curious about God - I hear and behold God in every object, yet understand God not in the least.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

Paine was a grand fellow — high—with the most splendid sense of justice. But he was a reasoner — not warm — not letting out the natural palpitating passion... which perhaps he didn't have. But I see all that and more in Ingersoll. His imagination flames and plays up, up, up. It is a grand height! And he has so sharp a blade, too; is many-sided, gifted for great effects in different spheres. I don't suppose we ever had a man here so well adapted to that work. {Whitman's thought on Thomas Paine and his good friend, Robert Ingersoll}

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

You have not known what you are - you have slumber'd upon yourself all your life; Your eye-lids have been the same as closed most of the time; What you have done returns already in mockeries; Your thrift, knowledge, prayers, if they do not return in mockeries, what is their return? The mockeries are not you; Underneath them, and within them, I see you lurk.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Many a good man I have seen go under.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

As to scenery (giving my own thought and feeling), while I know the standard claim is that Yosemite, Niagara Falls, the Upper Yellowstone and the like afford the greatest natural shows, I am not so sure but the prairies and plains, while less stunning at first sight, last longer, fill the esthetic sense fuller, precede all the rest, and make North America's characteristic landscape.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Walt Whitman

Poetic style, when address'd to the Soul, is less definite form, outline, sculpture, and becomes vista, music, half-tints, and even less than half- tints. True, it may be architecture; but again it may be the forest wild-wood, or the best effects thereof, at twilight, the waving oaks and cedars in the wind, and the impalpable odor.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

What a devil art thou, Poverty! How many desires - how many aspirations after goodness and truth - how many noble thoughts, loving wishes toward our fellows, beautiful imaginings thou hast crushed under thy heel, without remorse or pause!

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

dash me with amorous wet, i can repay you

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

O public road, I say back I am not afraid to leave you, yet I love you, you express me better than I can express myself.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

Henceforth I ask not good fortune. I myself am good fortune.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

My words itch at your ears till you understand them

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

With music strong I come, with my cornets and my drums, I play not marches for accepted victors only, I play marches for conquer'd and slain persons. Have you heard that it was good to gain the day? I also say it is good to fall, battles are lost in the same spirit in which they are won. I beat and pound for the dead, I blow through my embouchures my loudest and gayest for them.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

Without enough wilderness America will change. Democracy, with its myriad personalities and increasing sophistication, must be fibred and vitalized by regular contact with outdoor growths - animals, trees, sun warmth and free skies - or it will dwindle and pale.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

All music is what awakes from you when you are reminded by the instruments. It is not the violins and the cornets-it is not the oboe nor the beating drums, nor the score of the baritone singer singing his sweet romanza-nor that of the women's chorus; it is nearer and farther than they.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

The genius of the United States is not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges, or churches, or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors, but always most in the common people.

By Anonym 18 Sep

Walt Whitman

Song of myself Smile O voluptuous cool-breath'd earth! Earth of the slumbering and liquid trees! Earth of departed sunset--earth of the mountains misty-topt! Earth of the vitreous pour of the full moon just tinged with blue! Earth of shine and dark mottling the tide of the river! Earth of the limpid gray of clouds brighter and clearer for my sake! Far-swooping elbow'd earth--rich apple-blossom'd earth! Smile, for your lover comes.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

I think I could turn and live with animals, they are so placid and self-contain'd, I stand and look at them long and long.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

When I heard the learn’d astronomer; When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me; When I was shown the charts and the diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them; When I, sitting, heard the astronomer, where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room, How soon, unaccountable, I became tired and sick; Till rising and gliding out, I wander’d off by myself, In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time, Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Love-buds, put before you and within you, whoever you are, Buds to be unfolded on the old terms; If you bring the warmth of the sun to them, they will open, and bring form, color, perfume, to you; If you become the aliment and the wet, they will become flowers, fruits, tall blanches and trees.

By Anonym 15 Sep

Walt Whitman

Those who love each other shall become invincible.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

I sing the body electric, The armies of those I love engirth me and I engirth them, They will not let me off till I go with them, respond to them, And discorrupt them, and charge them full with the charge of the soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

O to speed where there is space enough and air enough at last!

By Anonym 18 Sep

Walt Whitman

Swiftly arose and spread around me the peace and knowledge that pass all the argument of the earth, And I know that the hand of God is the promise of my own, And I know that the spirit of God is the brother of my own, And that all the men ever born are also my brothers, and the women my sisters and lovers, And that a kelson of the creation is love, And limitless are leaves stiff or drooping in the fields, And brown ants in the little wells beneath them, And mossy scabs of the worm fence, heap'd stones, elder, mullein and poke-weed.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Simplicity is the glory of expression.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

I exist as I am, that is enough, If no other in the world be aware, I sit content, And if each and all be aware, I sit content.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Logic and sermons never convince, The damp of the night drives deeper into my soul.

By Anonym 14 Sep

Walt Whitman

Roaming in thought over the Universe, I saw the little that is Good steadily hastening towards immortality, And the vast all that is called Evil I saw hastening to merge itself and become lost and dead.

By Anonym 13 Sep

Walt Whitman

I see great things in baseball. It's our game - the American game. It will take our people out-of-doors, fill them with oxygen, give them a larger physical stoicism. Tend to relieve us from being a nervous, dyspeptic set. Repair these losses, and be a blessing to us.

By Anonym 16 Sep

Walt Whitman

I exist as I am, that is enough...